Jump to content
IGNORED

John David and Abbie 10: Selling Clothes on Poshmark to Make Ends Meet


nelliebelle1197

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, louisa05 said:

Someone explained to me on Reddit awhile back that if you have a stand alone name with no “formal” long version, you can’t get a bank account or access medical services because you have to use a “long formal name” for that. Many people agreed with her. So there are literally people who don’t understand what a legal name is and that a legal name can be short and not nicknamed. 
 

On a related note, a friend of ours in his mid-40s recently legally changed his name to his nickname. He’s never been called his legal name in his life. He asked his oldest sister if it was ever used when he was a baby even. Her only recollection was at his baptism. Basically it was like Mike/Michael or Matthew/Matt. 

I haven't heard this. My parents wanted to give each of us kids five letter names and two of ours can be considered nicknames- think "Abby" and "Andy" (I know that both are only four letters but you get the picture). They didn't want to give us the long name because there could be multiple ways to spell our longer names. I have never had trouble opening bank accounts, finding leases, or getting healthcare with my legal name of"Abby" and neither has my brother "Andy". 

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Abbie and the baby were at Trace's wedding. I would guess a few weeks old. Also probably why they announced yesterday as she knew it would leak. Screenshot_20221002-132332.thumb.png.c89dc1ea85e8d558c42d18b239387e64.png

  • Upvote 8
  • I Agree 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 hours ago, JDuggs said:

I think the name Charles is very formal sounding compared to Charlie. Whereas a name like Thomas (very formal) can be shortened to Tom (more adult casual) from Tommy (more for a child). You can’t shorten Charlie to a more “appropriate” adult nickname, unless you totally change it to Chuck, etc., and you end up only back to Charles, which is kind of stuffy. I think Charlie for an adult man is used a lot more than nicknames like Johnny, Billy, Bobby. And I have a son in his 20s who still goes by a Johnny type nickname. We always called him that growing up and he’s still called it by all of his friends.

In my small office (38 people) we have two Thomas' and a William. They go by T, Tommy and Billy. We also have two James' and they both go by James. Names and nicknames are fascinating. 

  • Upvote 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 10/2/2022 at 12:34 PM, Audrey2 said:

I haven't heard this. My parents wanted to give each of us kids five letter names and two of ours can be considered nicknames- think "Abby" and "Andy" (I know that both are only four letters but you get the picture). They didn't want to give us the long name because there could be multiple ways to spell our longer names. I have never had trouble opening bank accounts, finding leases, or getting healthcare with my legal name of"Abby" and neither has my brother "Andy". 

Of course, you haven’t.  The idiots on Reddit who have a legal name like Elizabeth and go by Beth literally don’t understand that those things require your legal name not a longer/ “formal” version of the name you go by. So they were telling people that when you name your child they must have a longer name for those purposes. This results in people on the names sub asking dumb questions like “what can be a long name for nickname Chloe”. 

  • Haha 10
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, louisa05 said:

Of course, you haven’t.  The idiots on Reddit who have a legal name like Elizabeth and go by Beth literally don’t understand that those things require your legal name not a longer/ “formal” version of the name you go by. So they were telling people that when you name your child they must have a longer name for those purposes. This results in people on the names sub asking dumb questions like “what can be a long name for nickname Chloe”. 

Good Lord…as I age, have larger medical needs and see more specialists, I am constantly fighting the formal/informal name. I never go by my longer version name (think Catherine vs Cathy), but the name on my insurance card is the longer/formal version. I don’t want my doctor calling me Catherine (not my name), yet I have to put that name on the forms as to not have issues with insurance coverage. I’ve taken to inputting my formal name with common name in parenthesis, if the system will allow. Technology has not helped in this area. 

  • Upvote 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 10/2/2022 at 1:27 PM, shesinsane said:

I work for a federal agency (part of DHS) and everyone's email address is first name.last name@agency.dhs.gov. On my team of 11 individuals, there are 4 people whose use names that don't match their emails. One always uses her middle name and the others have nicknames, so whenever I have to prepare lists, I make sure to include the name they answer to along with their email address because it's not as simple as first name.last name. 

To provide an example, I'll borrow a senator from Utah. Senator Romney can be emailed by filling out a form for his website, but if he were a staffer instead of senator, his email would be Willard.Romney@senate.gov because Willard is his formal first name. Despite him handing out business cards with "willard.romney@senate.gov", the emails servers will be busy returning emails sent to "mitt.romney@sentate.gov", user unknown. 

I believe the email rule is based in security, but it ends up being another hurdle that workers with non-English names have to clear simply to do their job. They have to choose between having their given name frequently mispronounced (plus the micro aggressions some Americans deploy when told "the correct pronunciation is _______" ) or working with two different names; one for documents and computer systems, another for conversations and meetings. 

Similar occupation, but I actually only use my formal first name for work. No one in my family or close circle uses my legal first name so it helps with boundaries. Easier for me to keep my professional and personal life totally separate.

All of these “classic” names just mean you end up with 10 “Joseph.smith@email.gov” entries on the listserv 🙄

  • Upvote 4
  • Love 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you look at the SSA baby name site, you’ll find many names like Billy, Bobby, Emmy, Tommy, Terry, Jerry, Tori, Cindy, Kate, and so many more that are stand alone names. They aren’t short for William, Robert, Emily, Thomas, Terrance, Gerald, Victoria, Cynthia, or Kathryn. People have been giving their children names like this for over a hundred years. 

  • Upvote 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

36 minutes ago, JermajestyDuggar said:

If you look at the SSA baby name site, you’ll find many names like Billy, Bobby, Emmy, Tommy, Terry, Jerry, Tori, Cindy, Kate, and so many more that are stand alone names. They aren’t short for William, Robert, Emily, Thomas, Terrance, Gerald, Victoria, Cynthia, or Kathryn. People have been giving their children names like this for over a hundred years. 

LOL…my name is on that list!

  • Upvote 2
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My dad was christened Billy Joe, back in the early 30s. People called him Bill. I guess that would twist the minds of people who thought you had to backname a Chloe. 

  • Upvote 2
  • Confused 1
  • Haha 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

@SassyPants the major healthcare system in my area (that most of my doctors are connected with) has a space on forms for your preferred name, so I don't get called by the long version of my name (which I detest and never use unless I have to). My ophthalmologist and glaucoma specialists do the same thing. Makes me happy! The long name vs. short is a minor annoyance in the grand scheme of things, I know, but it's nice to be called by your preferred name.

 

  • Upvote 3
  • I Agree 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, backyard sylph said:

My dad was christened Billy Joe, back in the early 30s. People called him Bill. I guess that would twist the minds of people who thought you had to backname a Chloe. 

I named my son the nickname of a classic name. But sometimes I use the formal name as a nickname! 

  • Upvote 4
  • Haha 2
  • Love 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I specifically gave my kids names that were just their names, no shortened versions just for this reason.  My husband has always used the “kid” version of his name.  He doesn’t want to use the long version because he doesn’t feel like that’s really his name (even though it legally is) but he feels the kid version is unprofessional. We picked our kids names with this in mind. 
 

I did come across a lady with a daughter name Abby once. I asked if it was short for Abigail and she said no that her legal name was Abby,  but her middle name was  Gail 🙄

  • Upvote 1
  • Eyeroll 1
  • Haha 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 10/2/2022 at 5:32 PM, SassyPants said:

There’s something about the IE ending vs a Y that I don’t care for. Maybe I equate it with being cutsie or infantile? Abbie is different than Abby,  likely just my own hang up. Isn’t Chaz also a nickname for Charles. 

My dad is Chas (for Charles). I don't know if it was an adult thing or he's always been Chas, I can't see him as a Charlie or a Charles, they would both be weird on him.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

40 minutes ago, imokit said:

My dad is Chas (for Charles). I don't know if it was an adult thing or he's always been Chas, I can't see him as a Charlie or a Charles, they would both be weird on him.

I know someone named Chas. He’s named after his dad. His father goes by Charlies & he goes by Chas. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, SassyPants said:

LOL…my name is on that list!

 

16 hours ago, SassyPants said:

LOL…my name is on that list!

My mother's legal name was Betty, born in 1925. Her mom was a flapper and an actress and I think at the time she considered it very modern and jazzy.  Back in the day, though, the Catholic Church only used formal saints' names, so she was christened Elizabeth.

In my boomer generation there were a lot of Debis, Kathis, Wendys, etc. Cutesy names were the thing for girls but the boys all seemed to have formal names: the Bobbys were Roberts, Billys were William, etc.
my son's generation (X) kept the formal names for boys with no nicknames: Robert, Andrew, William, Jonathan, not Bobby, Andy, Jonny or Billy.

Also, in my Irish Catholic family and extended circle, there was a limited supply of names that were acceptable (saints and/or family members), so if you got the formal name you hopefully got a nickname that was different: john/Jack/Johnny; Patricia/Pat/Trish/Patsy and so on. There are still, however, a few unfortunate "Little X"es who are well into middle age.

  • Upvote 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 minutes ago, patsymae said:

 

My mother's legal name was Betty, born in 1925. Her mom was a flapper and an actress and I think at the time she considered it very modern and jazzy.  Back in the day, though, the Catholic Church only used formal saints' names, so she was christened Elizabeth.

 

The great Betty White, born in 1922, was just Betty too.  Her parents' rationale for not naming her the more formal Elizabeth was that they were going to call her Betty as a nickname anyway, so her formal name may as well be that.   

  • Upvote 4
  • Love 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you look, the name Betty was #2 in the US for almost a decade 100 years ago. Not Elizabeth. Just Betty. I like the name. I always said if I got a white kitty I would call her Betty White.

  • Upvote 5
  • Love 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

33 minutes ago, patsymae said:

 

My mother's legal name was Betty, born in 1925. Her mom was a flapper and an actress and I think at the time she considered it very modern and jazzy.  Back in the day, though, the Catholic Church only used formal saints' names, so she was christened Elizabeth.

In my boomer generation there were a lot of Debis, Kathis, Wendys, etc. Cutesy names were the thing for girls but the boys all seemed to have formal names: the Bobbys were Roberts, Billys were William, etc.
my son's generation (X) kept the formal names for boys with no nicknames: Robert, Andrew, William, Jonathan, not Bobby, Andy, Jonny or Billy.

Also, in my Irish Catholic family and extended circle, there was a limited supply of names that were acceptable (saints and/or family members), so if you got the formal name you hopefully got a nickname that was different: john/Jack/Johnny; Patricia/Pat/Trish/Patsy and so on. There are still, however, a few unfortunate "Little X"es who are well into middle age.

My husband is from Ireland. His 1st 3 sibs are John, Ann, Joe. And the first names of one of their sets of cousins are John, Ann and Joe. I think the Irish had a strict name pattern. #1 son after X, #2 son after Y, #1 daughter after Z etc…lots of repeat names. 

My mom (Catholic) was named Elizabeth, but has always gone by Betty. She is one of those people that has ignored her given name and everything is now in Betty- I now wonder how she did that. She also had some issue with her original BC. She is almost 90 and I think she was born at home to immigrant parents. Maybe she is the first dreamer?

  • Upvote 2
  • Love 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Jana814 said:

I know someone named Chas. He’s named after his dad. His father goes by Charlies & he goes by Chas. 

I know a Chaz.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a ‘nickname name’, my mum loved the name but not the lengthened versions so didn’t want to give me a name that would never be used. I like the name but it does get annoying when I introduce myself and people automatically ask what my name is short for. 
 

By comparison, my brother is known by a nickname but has a traditional name on his birth certificate. My parents reasoning being that if he wanted a professional job in the future then he should have a traditional name that he could go by if he wanted. Because of course, as a female, there was no chance I’d want to go into a profession where I’d benefit from a more traditional name 🙄

  • Upvote 1
  • Sad 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 hours ago, JermajestyDuggar said:

If you look, the name Betty was #2 in the US for almost a decade 100 years ago. Not Elizabeth. Just Betty. I like the name. I always said if I got a white kitty I would call her Betty White.

My daughter is Elizabeth but we call her Betty. I have read that it is becoming the trendy nickname for Elizabeth again. 

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, CanadianMamam said:

My daughter is Elizabeth but we call her Betty. I have read that it is becoming the trendy nickname for Elizabeth again. 

Nicknames for Elizabeth go in cycles. It was Betty 100 years ago. Then Liz or Lizzie was popular. Then Beth. Then Ellie or Eliza. Now it’s going to be Betty again. 

  • Upvote 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, JermajestyDuggar said:

Nicknames for Elizabeth go in cycles. It was Betty 100 years ago. Then Liz or Lizzie was popular. Then Beth. Then Ellie or Eliza. Now it’s going to be Betty again. 

I find name trends so interesting, that you can guess how old someone is based.on their name/nickname. My name was in the top 10 the year I was born, but kind of faded after that and most people with my name are actually slightly older than me. 

I would have probably gone with Beth as a nickname, but my husband had his heart set on Betty 

 

  • Upvote 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My name is a less popular version of a 70s(ish) name so while my nickname is the same - people rarely get my full name right.

Think along the lines of Nicole/Nicola with the nickname Nicky.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



  • Trending Content

  • Recent Status Updates

    • KnittingOwl

      KnittingOwl

      First snow storm of the season hit today. It got windy tonight, and we lost power. Somehow this continues to be a shock to PSE. Why they refuse to upgrade the infrastructure or do something so that 10s of thousands of people don’t lose power and heat literally every time it’s windy, I do not understand. We live in the Pacific Northwest. It gets windy!
      · 2 replies
    • louisa05

      louisa05

      Nebraska's new football coach is an evangelical bullshit artist who participates in "Man Up Ministries" conferences in the off season. Their motto is "Fighting for Biblical Manhood". Excuse me while I go vomit. 
      · 2 replies
    • 47of74

      47of74

      Don't know I'd charge quite that much though.
       

      · 0 replies
    • 47of74

      47of74

      Wisconsin’s first thanksgiving 

      · 0 replies
    • mango_fandango

      mango_fandango

      Long time no visit…
      COVID has finally caught up with me. Dad tested positive first, last Friday, then my mother, brother and I all tested positive today. Main symptom is feeling really really tired. Hopefully it doesn’t get much worse 🤞 
      · 1 reply
    • 47of74

      47of74

      Yeah probably not the best place to put that quote...

      · 0 replies
    • 47of74

      47of74

      If I still did the Catholic thing with confession this would be the priest who heard mine..

      · 0 replies
    • BlackberryGirl

      BlackberryGirl

      Do I wear it?
      i was given a vintage, 70 year old mink coat. It fits like it was made for me. Somehow my cousin, who is 8 years older than me came into 3 gorgeous fur coats from a granddaughter of a woman her mother knew. We’re talking women who died in the mid 60’s.  None of them would fit her or any other of the women in my family. Yay for essentially being a ball. Everyone else is about 5’7 or more and all outweigh me by 50+. 
       
      it is just gorgeous. What women in Skokie and Highland Park many years ago, when I still lived there would call a “serviceable” fur. It was the fur they’d wear to a good restaurant, but not the opera or symphony.
      do I wear it? I’d love to, and I live in hunting country so fur isn’t looked down on. But is it wrong?  Arrrgh god its pretty.
      · 5 replies
    • JoyfulSel

      JoyfulSel

      A modern day love story: Guy reaches out to you, you think he's cute so you start talking to him, give him your number. Guy then messages if you're free, you reply yes, guy never responds again. Love that. 👌
      · 1 reply
    • Maggie Mae

      Maggie Mae

      Ugh people who comment on height are the worst. 
      · 1 reply
  • Recent Blog Entries

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.