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hoipolloi

Shoshanna Pearl Easling Promotes Plexus AND White Supremacy

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hoipolloi
Posted (edited)

In between shilling Plexus garbage and pimping her family for Plexus, Shoshanna has been posting shrill screeds about the protests, filled with lies, and calling for her leghumpers to pray for tRump.

Now, the gloves are off, and she's discarded the dog whistle for the vuvuzela with this latest FB post:

1707850077_ShoshannaPearlEaslingisawhitesuprelmacist.thumb.png.8ed99cce7fa170b5fd01438af8051312.png

 

Edited by Coconut Flan
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Howl
Posted (edited)

Ah, the ubiquitous use of the very scary "they".  Gosh, I'm on the left and I'm not familiar with any of the things she espouses because it's all BS.   Also, she begins with a rant about teachers being hired from the ranks of Democrats.  First, she knows jack shit about public schooling.  Nothing. Zilch zero nada.  So this spectre of children kneeling blah blah has nothing to do with her or her children or anyone else she knows. She's so clueless she doesn't realize that politics aren't considered during the hiring process for teachers. 

However in my limited experience, religion sometimes does.  A dear friend and excellent teacher could never get hired on in the school system of a particular small town in SW Colorado; really, you had to be Mormon. It wasn't much of a secret. 

In a small town near a largish city in the Texas Panhandle, a relative was interviewing for a job and was asked if she'd found her church yet.  Church is such a large part of life in that part of Texas that it was considered a friendly query, because of course finding your (Christian) congregation is just what you do to settle in.  She wasn't raised going to church and isn't a Christian, so she just bluffed her way through it saying she was still looking.  She ended up working there, and loved the sweet teachers, but that's how it is. 

While she was attending grad school at the state university in the largish city, a student would typically start a group study session with a prayer. In grad school. 

Oh, anyway, before I get really carried away ranting about this total nincompoop,  f**k whining snowflake Shoshanna Easling.  

Edited by Howl

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Caroline

I don't  know where she gets her statistics about public schools and their hiring practices, but there are several Trumpers in my high school in a very liberal part of the country.  There are also a number of students who are Trump supporters because their parents are.  Most of the students have parents in the military because ours is a town with a military base.  The Trump supporter teachers are way more vocal about their beliefs than any of the more liberal staff.  In fact, we Trump haters are very silent on the matter because national politics in a public school is not a good idea right now unless it's part of your curriculum.   Shoshanna, like most of her ilk, is uninformed. 

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TeddyBonkers

Shoshana, cite your sources. The teachers at my Mom's school are mostly Republican and religious. It's not a secret and not surprising, as it's a deep red state. Personal politics don't belong in the classroom. In my 4 years in a public high school, not once did a teacher try to indoctrinate me. In my 7 years of college, not once was I indoctrinated by an instructor. 

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JermajestyDuggar

Shoshanna makes big bucks taking advantage of others. How does she sleep at night knowing tons of people in her downline are growing poorer by the minute while she takes in the big bucks? She’s a fraud who was raised by child abusers. Her racism doesn’t surprise me in the least. 

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Caroline
1 hour ago, Howl said:

Ah, the ubiquitous use of the very scary "they".  Gosh, I'm on the left and I'm not familiar with any of the things she espouses because it's all BS.   Also, she begins with a rant about teachers being hired from the ranks of Democrats.  First, she knows jack shit about public schooling.  Nothing. Zilch zero nada.  So this spectre of children kneeling blah blah has nothing to do with her or her children or anyone else she knows. She's so clueless she doesn't realize that politics aren't considered during the hiring process for teachers. 

However in my limited experience, religion sometimes does.  A dear friend and excellent teacher could never get hired on in the school system of a particular small town in SW Colorado; really, you had to be Mormon. It wasn't much of a secret. 

In a small town near a largish city in the Texas Panhandle, a relative was interviewing for a job and was asked if she'd found her church yet.  Church is such a large part of life in that part of Texas that it was considered a friendly query, because of course finding your (Christian) congregation is just what you do to settle in.  She wasn't raised going to church and isn't a Christian, so she just bluffed her way through it saying she was still looking.  She ended up working there, and loved the sweet teachers, but that's how it is. 

While she was attending grad school at the state university in the largish city, a student would typically start a group study session with a prayer. In grad school. 

Oh, anyway, before I get really carried away ranting about this total nincompoop,  f**k whining snowflake Shoshanna Easling.  

I grew up in New England, left for a while, and returned because I missed it.  My husband moved here because for me there's no better place to live politically, historically, and lots of other things.  But friends over the years who have lived in southern states (S. Carolina, N. Carolina, Texas, Tennessee) have all said the same thing about people asking immediately if they'd found a church yet.  One very outspoken friend who lived in S. Carolina for a few years actually told the first person who asked her that question that it was considered an overly personal and rude question where she came from (New York).  I feel the same way, and would likely react very badly if someone I didn't know asked me that question.  I wouldn't ask about someone's belief system any more than I would ask someone about their salary.  It's just obnoxious IMO. 

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CaricatureQualities
Posted (edited)

I heard that soon "THEY" are going to ban apple pie and blue jeans too. And who is to stop "THEM" ?!! Because clearly "THEY" have succeeded in cutting off Christian AND republican voices COMPLETELY because I for one can't find a single medium in which I can hear Christians or republicans discuss their views. I mean what do they even think about things anyway? What even is a Christian republican American?! I mean they get so little representation and I'm all the way up in Canada and I can't hear any republicans...let alone Christian republicans....over the deafening thunder of the all consuming "FAAARRRRR LLEFFFT"( say in a wrestling announcer voice).

 

Edited by CaricatureQualities

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patsymae
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Caroline said:

I grew up in New England, left for a while, and returned because I missed it.  My husband moved here because for me there's no better place to live politically, historically, and lots of other things.  But friends over the years who have lived in southern states (S. Carolina, N. Carolina, Texas, Tennessee) have all said the same thing about people asking immediately if they'd found a church yet.  One very outspoken friend who lived in S. Carolina for a few years actually told the first person who asked her that question that it was considered an overly personal and rude question where she came from (New York).  I feel the same way, and would likely react very badly if someone I didn't know asked me that question.  I wouldn't ask about someone's belief system any more than I would ask someone about their salary.  It's just obnoxious IMO. 

I had the same experience when I moved out of the NY metropolitan area, first to Cincinnati and then to North Carolina. I lived in one NJ town for 18 years and would have no idea what religion people were unless they wore distinctive clothing or invited me to an event. First week in Cincinnati I was stunned how many people asked me what religion I was (and if it's not mine it should be). Religious tracts left on your desk at work. I had never heard of the Rapture before.

Have to admit I became evil and started taking off Jewish holidays, although I am not Jewish. Didn't lie, just said "I'm not coming in. It's Yom Kippur." Both of which were true and probably juvenile of me but I enjoyed the "but you don't look..."

One Sunday morning in a convenience store I bought a paper and coffee and orange juice or something. The clerk ran it up and then asked me if I wanted to buy something else. Uh, no, I've got what I want. "I guess you're not a religious woman." "Huh? Religious people don't buy the Sunday paper and coffee? Turned out my receipt was $6.66 and I was supposed to be scared of burning in hell or something.

When I moved to NC for a job (as a newspaper editor, not a missionary), the publisher of all people asked me if I'd found a church home yet, and I should go to the Methodist church. This was in the workplace and was considered completely normal.

I hadn't been to Mass in probably 40 years but suddenly felt very Catholic.

Edited by patsymae

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hoipolloi
4 hours ago, Caroline said:

I don't  know where she gets her statistics about public schools and their hiring practices, but there are several Trumpers in my high school in a very liberal part of the country.  

Shoshanna's "statistics" about public school teachers are complete fabrications. Considering Shoshanna was home-schooled by Mike & Debi Pearl, it seems unlikely that any of these asshats would know much about public schools.

4 hours ago, JermajestyDuggar said:

Shoshanna makes big bucks taking advantage of others.

Totally. She & James are, IIRC, Diamond Ambassadors on Plexus, which means they're making several hundred thousand a year. That money is coming directly from the pockets of their downline. If that isn't theft, I don't what it is. Apparently, it's also Republican & Christian to rob your downline in that way.

To all who've responded re: public disclosure of religion: I've never had that experience and what you have related is both horrifying & astounding. Just goes to show how awful so many American Christians* are. 

*As Chrissy Stroop has pointed out, people like the Pearls, Easlings, and their leghumpers (not to mention fundie tRumpers) are not fake Christians or "Christians." Sadly, they're REAL and they're American. They are what they are and we'll have to deal with it. 

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ophelia
30 minutes ago, hoipolloi said:

Totally. She & James are, IIRC, Diamond Ambassadors on Plexus, which means they're making several hundred thousand a year. That money is coming directly from the pockets of their downline. If that isn't theft, I don't what it is. Apparently, it's also Republican & Christian to rob your downline in that way.

Wow. I just can't wrap my head around how much money you can actually make when you somehow get up that business ladder. It is really sickening to think about the fact how much money they steal from their team members and how their unscientific advertisments prey on people that are dealing with health issues. I have to admit that when Kori Wissmann posted about Plexus curing her PCO and helping her to become pregnant it made me really curious. I have PCO as well and would LOVE to have a child.. I'm so afraid that it won't happen because of my health issues that I really get a lump in my throat just typing this. I'm glad I don't live in the US, otherwise I might have contacted her and placed an order with her.

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therulesofjinx
11 hours ago, Caroline said:

 I feel the same way, and would likely react very badly if someone I didn't know asked me that question.  I wouldn't ask about someone's belief system any more than I would ask someone about their salary.  It's just obnoxious IMO. 

Ditto. I also grew up and still live in New England (I've lived in different states, but all in NE). I think my home state is ranked the least religious state in the country, or at least pretty far up on that list. If ever moved and someone asked me about my church, I would either react badly or just stare with my mouth open. Religion and church are not things often discussed in my neck of the woods. They are typically either non-existent for many (like me) or just very personal. 

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anachronistic

I’m in Massachusetts, and when I used to be around people, I used to wear chalice necklaces almost every day - I have a few, including some bright, glittery, rainbow ones. I’ve had people see them and ask if I’m a UU (Unitarian Universalist, our symbol is a flaming chalice) or comment that they’re UU too, but that’s it. I’ve never been asked my religion and the only times I’ve seen public prayer are at things like vigils or memorial services. Years ago at a conference when I disclosed my disabilities a woman said that she’d pray for me, and I went off on her about how I did NOT need her gods help, who did she think she was, etc. Pretty sure that woman never offered prayer to someone she didn’t know well again. 

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Alisamer
8 hours ago, hoipolloi said:

To all who've responded re: public disclosure of religion: I've never had that experience and what you have related is both horrifying & astounding.

I've lived in North Carolina all my life and I've never had that happen either, actually. Nobody's ever asked me what church I go to unless it's been in relation to a topic we were discussing, that I can remember. (Except, of course, the rare door-knockers. They're usually Jehovah's Witness but occasionally Church of God.) 

It does come up now and then - I work for a printer and we print for churches so it may get mentioned there (boss has asked me questions regarding something we printed for a  protestant church, I've asked him about things we printed for the temple), and outside of that somebody might mention a social event they've been to that happened at church, or "oh yeah, I know her, she goes to my church." My church burned down a couple years ago, and that's come up once or twice as well.

At work, I have actually invited people to my church - but only for our Christmas handbell concert where I was performing! They knew I played handbells because I had rehearsals for a community group and had to leave a few minutes early on Tuesday, and they had expressed interest. (And for the record, it was just a concert. My Jewish boss went and enjoyed it.) I hope that doesn't make me one of "those people".

It just comes up sometimes. People ask "what did you do this weekend", and if what you did was go to a concert (like an AMAZING violin concert I attended - not religious at all, just a classical violinist playing an amazing violin, I think maybe a Guarneri? It's bodyguard was a church member so that's how that happened.) they might ask where it was and "at this church" for me is sometimes followed by "Oh, do you go there? That's such a pretty building...". Weddings often happen in churches, as do funerals, and sometimes baby or wedding showers, etc. 

But I agree it's pretty intrusive to just out of nowhere ask people what church they attend. I think part of the time it's just that might be the core of people's social circle so they don't think not to ask, but other times it's definitely offensive.

 

Shoshanna Pearl, however, is pretty obviously channeling her odious father here. She's terrible. Even here where lots of people attend church and it's more likely to come up in conversation, it's never asked in hiring decisions. I only know the religious beliefs of ONE teacher I had growing up. Just one. And I didn't know it at the time as a child, I found out later when my family joined the church he attended. There are a big number of teachers in our congregation, however, so if "they" are trying to fill the schools with anti-religious zealots they're failing miserably. (And I'm a few-times-a-year church attender, while the teachers are all much more faithful.)

Teachers are teaching the things they're hired to teach. That doesn't include religion. 

The Pearls are terrible people.

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Skyline

Decades ago my mom hit a bull moose with a car, she was lucky to be alive. Our 'good Christian' neighbor came over after to tell us kids how her accident was Gods way of telling us we weren't praying enough. 

How cruel do you have to be to lay that on children?! Anyways, when my mother was better she went off on this woman. I don't know what was said but she never graced our doorstep again. 

'Good Christian' my a$$ 🙄

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Red Hair, Black Dress

My first job out of grad school was teaching in a Baptist Junior College (in the South; full disclosure I'm born in and lived my entire life in the South).  No one asked my religion during the hiring process or mentioned religion at all.  I took the job because it paid more than the other offer I had.

Monday morning after the  initial 3 days of school the previous week, I arrived bright and early to begin my first full week as an instructor.  Within 10 minutes of my arrival, before I even made it to my office, 5-6 people said " we missed you yesterday" with a knowing look.

I began quietly freaking. Oh dear Rufus, I thought, there was some meeting or reception on Sunday and I wasn't there. Why didn't anyone tell me? What am I going to do?  How do I fix this?   By the time the last person said they had missed me Sunday I had the nerve to ask what I'd missed.

With a small crowd  gathered around her to witness, the answer came:  We missed you at church yesterday. Pastor XYZ preached a wonderful sermon. We couldn't imagine why you weren't there, being new to the town and all. Everyone who teaches here goes to the Baptist church.  We guess you just aren't settled in yet. All of this said in a nosy inquiring voice with knowing looks from everyone who had gathered to watch.

I said Oh, well you see  ... I'm not Baptist.  Reply -- You're not!!!! [literal gasps, pearl clutching, shocked faces}. What are you????  Sooooo many snarky answers flitted though my brain ..... Druid, Aztec priestess  Goth, Vizagoth, follower of Anton LaVey...... But I answered truthfully -- I'm Catholic.  Catholic!!!! Cue the truly horrified voices and expressions. You're ..... a ... a ... Catholic!!!!???!!!! Cue even more truly horrified voices and expressions. Yes I am. I said. 

By lunchtime the news was all over the school. I wasn't a Baptist. I was a heathen Catholic, I worshipped statues and the Virgin Mary and didn't believe in Jesus.  I was not born again. I was definitely not a Christian. 

About a month later one of my student during office hours confided in me she'd never met anyone who wasn't a Christian before.  Even though I seemed like a really nice person it was so sad I hadn't accepted Jesus as my Lord and Savior. I very gently told her that Catholics were Christians. That we were the original Church from which all Protestant sects split off. She smiled sadly and shook her head, oh Miss X, everybody knows Catholics aren't Christians. There's no way Baptists could come from a bunch of heathens.

Then she perked up -- but that's OK, a lot of girls in our class are praying for you,  that your heart will be changed and you'll accept Jesus and then be born again. I asked my pastor and he said he'd baptize you when you became a believer.

I must confess I was speechless at that, and I think I murmured something like how nice of you girls or thanks or you shouldn't have bothered or something.

I'll just note here that 20+ years later still a heathen Catholic and  the praying didn't work.

[I lasted one year at the school before the fundie meanness, smug judgement, fake righteousness, intolerance, and hypocrisy drove me to another job.]

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JanasTattooParlor
Posted (edited)

Teacher here from the lovely state of SC! I have never once been asked what my religion is and if I’m remembering correctly, it’s illegal to ask a question like that during the hiring process because then it can be misconstrued as religious discrimination if you don’t get the job. I work with both Republicans and Democrats and have never had someone ask me where I go to church at my job. The closest I got was a question about where my wedding officiant was from because I was telling a story about him and my coworker thought he was hilarious. He’s Baptist and from the Midwest/Pacific Northwest and he’s a friend who understands that my fiancé and I aren’t religious and respects that. My coworkers are not outspoken about their personal religious or political beliefs because it’s incredibly unprofessional to do so and we can get reprimanded or fired for voicing them. We had a teacher refuse to use a kid’s preferred pronouns this year and they got reamed for it and told that we accepted all students whether we personally agreed with their life or not because our job is to teach regardless of what the kid looks like or identifies as. I’m sure Shoshanna and her ilk would see this as a liberal practice despite it falling in line with Christians being told not to judge. It absolutely infuriates me that people are seeing racism as a leftist issue! It’s a PEOPLE issue and as Christians they should absolutely be fighting for the welfare and fair treatment of Black people! Sure BLM is an organization that is donating to Democratic candidates, but the Black Lives Matter movement is more than the organization and is filled with people from all walks of life, including Christians and Republicans. These fundies drive me absolutely crazy with their us vs. then mentality that’s been drilled into them. How can they possibly think that the blatant systemic racism in society is okay and that trying to dismantle that is unChristian? I just don’t get it. 

Edited by JanasTattooParlor

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Howl
Posted (edited)

Speaking of Southern-ness, I worked helping grad students at a Big State University here in the Lone Star State.  One of my doctoral students was from a truly Gothic Alabama family.  When one of our other doctoral students (raised in the  northeast) got a year-long teaching appointment at a small (and venerable) liberal arts college in central Mississippi, the student from Alabama gave her Southern Lessons.   The info proved very useful to Mr. Northeast in navigating a totally new environment with different customs, etiquette, idioms, expectations.   

 

6 hours ago, Alisamer said:

Shoshanna Pearl, however, is pretty obviously channeling her odious father here.

Yup, and what she's channeling is the Pearl's dogmatic approach to life, so zero need for critical thought.  Hate and vicious condemnation are perfectly fine, of course, because abortion, evil liberals, gay people, antifa. 

 

 

 

Edited by Howl

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Caroline
3 hours ago, Red Hair, Black Dress said:

My first job out of grad school was teaching in a Baptist Junior College (in the South; full disclosure I'm born in and lived my entire life in the South).  No one asked my religion during the hiring process or mentioned religion at all.  I took the job because it paid more than the other offer I had.

Monday morning after the  initial 3 days of school the previous week, I arrived bright and early to begin my first full week as an instructor.  Within 10 minutes of my arrival, before I even made it to my office, 5-6 people said " we missed you yesterday" with a knowing look.

I began quietly freaking. Oh dear Rufus, I thought, there was some meeting or reception on Sunday and I wasn't there. Why didn't anyone tell me? What am I going to do?  How do I fix this?   By the time the last person said they had missed me Sunday I had the nerve to ask what I'd missed.

With a small crowd  gathered around her to witness, the answer came:  We missed you at church yesterday. Pastor XYZ preached a wonderful sermon. We couldn't imagine why you weren't there, being new to the town and all. Everyone who teaches here goes to the Baptist church.  We guess you just aren't settled in yet. All of this said in a nosy inquiring voice with knowing looks from everyone who had gathered to watch.

I said Oh, well you see  ... I'm not Baptist.  Reply -- You're not!!!! [literal gasps, pearl clutching, shocked faces}. What are you????  Sooooo many snarky answers flitted though my brain ..... Druid, Aztec priestess  Goth, Vizagoth, follower of Anton LaVey...... But I answered truthfully -- I'm Catholic.  Catholic!!!! Cue the truly horrified voices and expressions. You're ..... a ... a ... Catholic!!!!???!!!! Cue even more truly horrified voices and expressions. Yes I am. I said. 

By lunchtime the news was all over the school. I wasn't a Baptist. I was a heathen Catholic, I worshipped statues and the Virgin Mary and didn't believe in Jesus.  I was not born again. I was definitely not a Christian. 

About a month later one of my student during office hours confided in me she'd never met anyone who wasn't a Christian before.  Even though I seemed like a really nice person it was so sad I hadn't accepted Jesus as my Lord and Savior. I very gently told her that Catholics were Christians. That we were the original Church from which all Protestant sects split off. She smiled sadly and shook her head, oh Miss X, everybody knows Catholics aren't Christians. There's no way Baptists could come from a bunch of heathens.

Then she perked up -- but that's OK, a lot of girls in our class are praying for you,  that your heart will be changed and you'll accept Jesus and then be born again. I asked my pastor and he said he'd baptize you when you became a believer.

I must confess I was speechless at that, and I think I murmured something like how nice of you girls or thanks or you shouldn't have bothered or something.

I'll just note here that 20+ years later still a heathen Catholic and  the praying didn't work.

[I lasted one year at the school before the fundie meanness, smug judgement, fake righteousness, intolerance, and hypocrisy drove me to another job.]

How awful!  I had an experience with some born-again Christians in New England, where they are much fewer in number.  The person said, "She's really nice even though she's not a Christian."  I remember feeling  kind of sorry for that ignorant person who had never left the comfort of her little corner of religion.  To be surrounded by that kind of attitude at work would be impossible for me.  I have no idea what anyone I work with believes or doesn't believe, and I'm ok with that.  I have no experience in the South, but I have a neighbor from a Southern state.  She, unfortunately, is as shallow as they come, and not someone I trust at all.  We hear all the time about Southern hospitality and Northern coldness, but I'll take the cold anytime.  Underneath the perceived cold is a depth I certainly don't see in my neighbor.  I know I'm basing my opinion on only one person, but it's interesting that you encountered that kind of pettiness in your one year at that school.

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Marmion
Posted (edited)

Back in the olden days Shoshana is referring to , public schools in the South had a pro-Confederate Lost Cause bias .  

Now of days , I feel that Public Schools are more evenhanded in their approach to the political process .   

Spoiler

 

Spoiler

 

Spoiler

 

I remember the first , and only presidential mock election my sister and I participated in , in '93 , I do believe ; we were homeschooled by the time of subsequent mock elections .  While I myself , as expected , had voted for George H.W. Bush , the incumbent , whom I had been familiar with , in part due to watching an address he gave to school children , in a video shown at the church held homeschool co-op , my sister and I had been enrolled in a couple years prior , she had wound up deciding to vote for then Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton .  Her first grade teacher had played them recorded speeches by both candidates , and then told the class to vote for the one they liked the best ; and my sister decided that she liked the sound of Clinton's voice , so she voted for him .  Now this seems ironic , as I since grew up to be largely a supporter of the Democratic party candidates , while my sister is a staunch religious right Republican . But I think that it just goes to show what can happen when a teacher simply gives equal time to both sides . My third grade teacher , on the other hand , decided not to cover the election in class , and instead told us that we could either watch the news , and / or read newspapers , or we could just ask our parents whom they were intending to vote for , and then vote accordingly ; which was what he said he expected most of us would do . Given this expectation , he said that he thought the mock election should accurately predict the results of the actual election .   According to this article ... 

Quote

The students have been wrong only twice:  In 1948, they picked Thomas E. Dewey over Harry S Truman, and in 1960, they “elected” Richard M. Nixon over John F. Kennedy.

https://schoolsofthought.blogs.cnn.com/2012/10/17/students-choose-obama-in-scholastic-mock-election/   At any rate , in my observation , American public / state school teachers do not have a political agenda ; especially when contrasted with certain evangelical parochial schools , and homeschooling , which can be traced back to the segregation academies , in the South .   { https://www.thedailybeast.com/segregation-is-still-alive-at-these-christian-schools ,  https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/may/08/christian-home-schooling-dark-side  , http://www.talk2action.org/story/2010/7/13/115425/990/Front_Page/Rushdoony_and_Theocratic_Libertarians_on_Slavery } 

Edited by Marmion

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hoipolloi

Shoshanna has doubled down on the racism and the stupidity:

669418407_Shoshannadoublesdown.thumb.png.a94100a09e131d3e17cfa64b00c3be2b.png

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Howl
Posted (edited)

FFS. 

Bitch, please.  The fear mongering, the idiocy, the ignorance, I just can't. 

But, note.  Support for Trump among white Evangelicals (fundys) like Shoshanna has hardly budged; it's as strong as ever and in some quarters, likely growing stronger. 

Someone posted a viable scenario on Twitter where Trump could lose the popular vote by 6 million and still win via electoral college.  Yeek! 

Also, I'm still curious what's up with Rebekah Pearl Anast, the oldest daughter.  She and her noxious husband moved to (I think) Michgan's UP and went dark on social media.  I'm not seeing that she's published additional books. 

According to the No Greater Joy web site, "Her and her husband have 6 mostly grown children that are honoring and loving Jesus. What a life."  I'm curious that none of the Pearl kids have mega families.  

Rebekah 6 kids 

Gabriel    5 kids

Nathan   4 kids 

Shalom   6 kids

Shoshanna 3 kids

 

Edited by Howl

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Giraffe

I’m still recovering from finding out she makes well over $100,000 off plexus!!!!

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Howl
59 minutes ago, Giraffe said:

I’m still recovering from finding out she makes well over $100,000 off plexus!!!!

I know. It's shocking.  She's making money off the backs of desperate gullible people trying to make a little to get by.  

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hoipolloi
1 hour ago, Giraffe said:

I’m still recovering from finding out she makes well over $100,000 off plexus!!!!

This income analysis of Plexus is about a year old but as a Diamond-level ambassador, Shoshanna is robbing people of bringing in about $418,000 per year. 

Shoshanna is a diamond.jpg

2 hours ago, Howl said:

But, note.  Support for Trump among white Evangelicals (fundys) like Shoshanna has hardly budged; it's as strong as ever and in some quarters, likely growing stronger. 

Yes, this is evident if you spend any time at all on their social media. I'd like to think that the fundie panic means that even these fuckwads see the writing on the wall, and that their racism & theocratic visions are going down for the count.

Nonetheless, I am also terrified that tRump could again lose the popular vote but still be re-elected via the slaveholders' gift to the white racist Christians of America, the Electoral College. 

 

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Marmion
2 hours ago, hoipolloi said:

Shoshanna has doubled down on the racism and the stupidity:

669418407_Shoshannadoublesdown.thumb.png.a94100a09e131d3e17cfa64b00c3be2b.png

 

22 minutes ago, hoipolloi said:

This income analysis of Plexus is about a year old but as a Diamond-level ambassador, Shoshanna is robbing people of bringing in about $418,000 per year. 

Shoshanna is a diamond.jpg

Yes, this is evident if you spend any time at all on their social media. I'd like to think that the fundie panic means that even these fuckwads see the writing on the wall, and that their racism & theocratic visions are going down for the count.

Nonetheless, I am also terrified that tRump could again lose the popular vote but still be re-elected via the slaveholders' gift to the white racist Christians of America, the Electoral College. 

 

And this is yet another motive for her antagonism towards Biden .  https://slate.com/business/2017/02/the-trump-era-will-be-a-boon-for-multilevel-marketing-companies.html  

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