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Coconut Flan

Counting On Season 8/9/10: How low will they go? (CW: Miscarriage)

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nastyhobbitses
5 hours ago, Chickenbutt said:

Can I ask an honest question? No snark, no judgement. If the church teachings have no impact on your lives, then why do you go to Church on Easter and Christmas? 

Same reason there are Cultural Jews (I count myself among them) who enjoy the camaraderie and traditions of the holidays and the symbolism and meaningfulness of services, or see religious services and holidays as a way to spend time with their family and community, even if they don't literally believe that there's a shrimp-hating space wizard who made giving birth hurt because a lady took nutrition advice from a reptile. Religion is a part of culture, and that has dimensions far beyond believing a certain thing. 

Also, it's a way to connect with family members who are religious (or remain on good terms with them). And in some communities, it's the ONLY way to remain a part of the community. In some communities, being openly atheist is actually life-threatening. So you get your ass to church or mosque or shul and try to make the best of it. 

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SorenaJ

Also there is a huge space between atheist and super religious who always goes to church. See Denmark. An extremely secular country, yet the majority of people are members of the national Church, and consider themselves Christian, and the majority of babies are christened into the church. They don't live their lives religiously, or go to church, and religion has no influence in their daily lives, but they are still Christian, and will go for weddings, christenings and maybe Christmas. They are not atheists, but more like agnostics, and consider themselves Christians. 

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MoonFace
5 hours ago, tabitha2 said:

An atheist going to church twice a year seems very odd too me because it’s fun? Tradition?  Seems very odd to me. But whatever.

So e see it as just a social event where you meet and greet like minded twice a year celebrants.    Sort of like going to a school reunion or a Old Home Day.

 

Sometimes it's just to appease the family.

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just_ordinary
7 hours ago, SorenaJ said:

Also there is a huge space between atheist and super religious who always goes to church. See Denmark. An extremely secular country, yet the majority of people are members of the national Church, and consider themselves Christian, and the majority of babies are christened into the church. They don't live their lives religiously, or go to church, and religion has no influence in their daily lives, but they are still Christian, and will go for weddings, christenings and maybe Christmas. They are not atheists, but more like agnostics, and consider themselves Christians. 

@Chickenbutt -I quoted @SorenaJ as it’s a perfect explanation.

I actually enjoy attending church from time to time. It’s calming because I like the music and know the liturgy. We often went with my grandparents and when I was a little child as my mother used to be the organist from time to time. But church teachings aren’t a big thing in our society. It took me till my late twenties to realise that our Protestant church are actually an union of  Unitarian, Lutheran and Reformed Churches. I didn’t know, just noticed that the liturgy seemed to slightly vary. Our churches also don’t do big websites with proclamations. To be honest, I am always baffled how much energy and research many Americans put into their church decisions. Many things I read here sound utterly outdated from my social background- the discussion about preacher wives and their impact on the congregation for example. That’s how I imagine church and society in the 1960s. Christianity in my country is much more about cultural traditions than anything else. Not for everyone of course but for the majority.

@tabitha2 I never claimed to be an atheist and from my experience most churches (Christian or other) are actually very welcoming. You might no be able to take part in everything (Catholic’s often don’t give out Communion to non-Catholics as opposed to Protestant churches where everyone is invited for example) but they are mostly just happy you are interested. I am sure you have your own experiences and I am very  sorry if you live in a surrounding where religious groups don’t treat others welcoming and nice.

Edited by just_ordinary

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Tired
BlackberryGirl

I met BlackberryBoy September 27, 1973, had ONE actual date, (we went to the library) and moved in with him December 4, 1973.  That’s 68 days, folks.  He was a cop, I was a waitress, he used to come to my diner and eat on his breaks. 

We got married 13 months after I moved in. We’ve been  together 45 years. 

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SamuraiKatz
I met BlackberryBoy September 27, 1973, had ONE actual date, (we went to the library) and moved in with him December 4, 1973.  That’s 68 days, folks.  He was a cop, I was a waitress, he used to come to my diner and eat on his breaks. 

We got married 13 months after I moved in. We’ve been  together 45 years. 

That is sweet.....I am a romantic.

 

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Waffle Time
allthegoodnamesrgone
11 hours ago, BlackberryGirl said:

I met BlackberryBoy September 27, 1973, had ONE actual date, (we went to the library) and moved in with him December 4, 1973.  That’s 68 days, folks.  He was a cop, I was a waitress, he used to come to my diner and eat on his breaks. 

We got married 13 months after I moved in. We’ve been  together 45 years. 

When you know, you know, and it is hard to explain to someone who hasn't been there. 

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front hugs > duggs

I'm not super close to my only living grandma because she's lived in Florida my whole life (and I'm from New Jersey). She recently told me a story about how she met her second husband and true love, who died fighting a fire when my mom was a teenager. He was a bartender and my grandma had gone out dancing with her girlfriends. The first thing he said to her was, "remind me to ask you to marry you some day." My grandma replied, "remind me to say yes". And they got married shortly after that! I think it's such a sweet story and I'm so grateful she shared it with me. I'll always have that as a fond memory of her life ❤️ 

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dharmapunk
On 2/14/2019 at 3:46 AM, tabitha2 said:

I will go to the Buddhist temple down the road on their holidays if it’s all good then. What’s good for the goose right?

Why not, if you enjoy it? I attended a Buddhist temple for years before eventually taking refuge (formally joining). Generally we are a welcoming bunch. We don't question why anybody is here. If newcomers have questions someone will answer them and show people where to sit and what to do. After the ceremony you will be invited to stay for tea and cake. We regularly have people who just come to see what a Buddhist temple is like. Some have ended up staying. ;)

 

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AreYouThereGothard?
On 2/14/2019 at 2:18 AM, nastyhobbitses said:

Same reason there are Cultural Jews (I count myself among them) who enjoy the camaraderie and traditions of the holidays and the symbolism and meaningfulness of services, or see religious services and holidays as a way to spend time with their family and community, even if they don't literally believe that there's a shrimp-hating space wizard who made giving birth hurt because a lady took nutrition advice from a reptile. Religion is a part of culture, and that has dimensions far beyond believing a certain thing. 

Also, it's a way to connect with family members who are religious (or remain on good terms with them). And in some communities, it's the ONLY way to remain a part of the community. In some communities, being openly atheist is actually life-threatening. So you get your ass to church or mosque or shul and try to make the best of it. 

I would totally go to the worship house more if the term “shrimp-hating space wizard” was used. 

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CharlieInCharge

I went through a multi-year period of spiritual searching. During that time I went to temples, mosques, synagogues, and churches. I was never once turned away for not being a member of the faith practiced there. I came away from that experience with the feeling that most people are more than happy to share their beliefs with an open and questioning mind. If someone gets joy from their religion I can easily see wanting to share that. 

 

I ended up an atheist, but a very pro-religion one. I don’t have faith, but I’ve seen people who do and it can be quite lovely. 

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MargaretElliott

I'm agnostic, and I go to church on Christmas and Easter, and the services held to honor family members throughout the year... because it is tradition, and I enjoy the singing, and it pleases my family, and the priest is a fantastic speaker and I love hearing what he has to say. This Christmas he discussed the Nativity from the perspective of Mary, an unwed Middle-Easter teenager who wasn't exactly welcomed into polite circles when she was about to give birth.... and he always includes those suffering from mental illness in his prayers, and that they find solace in those who have been trained to help them (NOT just God, though religion can help some people). Even if I don't necessarily believe in everything he says, it makes me happy to go. And to me, that's enough.

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