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HerNameIsBuffy

Informal poll: what do you call...

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SilverBeach
7 hours ago, Maggie Mae said:

A White Russian has vodka, cream/milk/half&half and Kahlua. Black Russian is vodka & Kahlua. 

I love lamb, cilantro, peanut butter, and Vegemite, but not together. obviously. 

You are right, I just don't use vodka so I enjoy modified white russians (light white russians?). 

Never tried Vegemite, but I'm in the midwestern USA where I was born and raised. Tastes are so individual, depending on culture, upbringing, emotional association, hormones, sense of smell and taste, and a host of other things.

I have tasted most of the foods I do not like, except for chitterlings (also known as chitlins). I cannot get past the smell, but mama and DD and Mr. Beach love them. Offal doesn't do it for me, but to each her own.

Viva la difference!

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Waffle Time
Palimpsest
7 hours ago, WhatWouldJohnCrichtonDo? said:

@Karma--I opened it. I smelled it. I still haven't tasted it. :pb_lol:

The most common mistake people make is to spread Vegemite and Marmite as thickly as Nutella or peanut butter.  Holy salt overload.

Try a very thin scrape (barely noticeable) on buttered toast and eat with scrambled eggs.  Or, especially if you are a carnivore, use it in cooking.  Marmite, not Vegemite, is a secret ingredient of mine in a really good pork and apple stew recipe.   American guests love it and ask for the recipe but they make faces when I mention the Marmite.   About 1/2 a tsp is also good to flavor beef stews and pot roasts but I haven't made those recently.  Tip - if using either Marmite or Vegemite in cooking leave out the salt completely or go very easy on it.

Vegemite and Marmite are acquired tastes. ;)

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SilverBeach
7 hours ago, Karma said:

Woo hoo, a non Australian who admits to liking vegemite!  Kudos to you, @Maggie Mae!  

Lol, @WhatWouldJohnCrichtonDo?, I don't feel so bad now that I know you haven't opened your vegemite. :) 

I also like coriander/cilantro in Thai food, which is very popular here.  Peanut butter I don't mind but haven't had in ages.  We grew up on lamb, would have eaten it at least 4 nights a week, but it's so expensive now that I don't buy it often.

 

I never had lamb growing up which is perhaps why it tasted like beef gone bad to me when I tried it as an adult.

I would try Vegemite but don't want to buy a whole jar in case I don't like it.

I love Andrew Zimmern's programs on the Travel Channel. Now there is a man who has tried eating just about everything around the globe. Ironically, he hates Spam. And durian fruit defeated him. I like his two bite rule. 

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nausicaa
11 hours ago, Karma said:

Were  peanut butter and jelly sandwiches at the top of that list, @nausicaa?  

I promised @WhatWouldJohnCrichtonDo? that I'd try one when were in the US a few months back, but I chickened out...

Ha, they didn't have that on the list, but I have heard several British friends express their confusion as to why we make those sandwiches and give them to kids for lunch. (I actually don't like pb&j, and never did, so I'm with you all there.)

This is the list for anyone who is curious. It's not all food:

http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/20-things-the-world-doesnt-get-about-living-in-america-236260

I love lamb, and goat burgers are my favorite type of burgers. Seriously amazing. I go to the farmer's market just so I can get goat. 

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Satisfied
HerNameIsBuffy
18 hours ago, SilverBeach said:

Kahlua and milk or cream is a white Russian. Don't ask me how I know, but don't get between me and my Kahlua. Or amaretto.

I do not like cilantro, lamb, or anything peanut butter unless it is a Reese cup. 

I also dislike cilantro, lamb, and anything pb except Reese's.. are you me?

10 hours ago, SilverBeach said:

I never had lamb growing up which is perhaps why it tasted like beef gone bad to me when I tried it as an adult.

I would try Vegemite but don't want to buy a whole jar in case I don't like it.

I love Andrew Zimmern's programs on the Travel Channel. Now there is a man who has tried eating just about everything around the globe. Ironically, he hates Spam. And durian fruit defeated him. I like his two bite rule. 

I had lamb growing up, trust me doesn't matter how early they try to foist it on you it always tastes like beef gone bad - that's a perfect description.

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Fascinated
14 minutes ago, HerNameIsBuffy said:

I also dislike cilantro, lamb, and anything pb except Reese's.. are you me?

I had lamb growing up, trust me doesn't matter how early they try to foist it on you it always tastes like beef gone bad - that's a perfect description.

Ok, you guys have lost me, now. Lamb is my second favourite meat (after pork)!!1!! Mint sauce?  With roasted potatoes, perhaps?  Yes, please!

See?  @Palimpsest gave me an upvote for lamb. It's the English in us, no doubt. 

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Palimpsest

Lamb can be very nice.  Properly cooked and with mint sauce or even better - Cumberland sauce!  Cumberland sauce is to die for.

What I really want to know though - how can @SilverBeach and @HerNameIsBuffy pollute the glory that is chocolate with peanut butter.

Reese's cups - yuck!  No, double yuck.  :lol:

 

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Maggie Mae

@nausicaa's link amuses me and I want to respond to things. 

Our Food:

Quote

Why you call the main course the entrée. - elpaw

Entrée literally means "starter dish" in French.

This is something I honestly didn't know. 2 years of high school french and two years of college french, one trip to Paris, and one to Brittany and I still just never made this connection. Shows how smart and well informed I am. I have no idea why we do this. 

 

Quote

That weird dish with sweet potato and marshmallows. - Midsky

Don't knock it 'til you've tried it.

We don't all love this monstrosity of a dish.  Yuck. 

 

Quote

People from Europe don't like root beer, don't understand why anybody would want to drink it. They say it tastes "foreign." -Jewels_Vern

 

I think it tastes like medicine. The stuff that a local microbrewery makes is OK, but if I'm DD I usually go for the cream soda. What do Europeans think about cream soda? 

Quote

Food sizes. Their small milkshake is the same size as Australia's large milkshake. - onelovesuperwoman416

 

I'm not even going to touch this one. I also don't know when the last time I ordered a milkshake even was. Is that still a thing? Who is buying these giant milkshakes? I ordered an 7 ounce latte the other day and my stomach was so upset from all of the sugar and milk. I know that certain gross places have phased out the small. I always order the kid's size if that's an option. 

Quote

Drive-thru everything! - outofplaceandstrange

It's awesome, right? Except when it's late at night and you are drunk and hungry and want food that shouldn't be served to anyone and the only thing open is stupid drive-throughs. (You can't walk through a drive-through, they won't serve you.) 

 

The ways we travel:

Quote

Why do so few Americans own a passport? - phlap

America is big, and international travel is expensive. There are plenty of wonderful places to explore without ever leaving the continental U.S.

We've got 84.9 million acres of National Parks. 193 million acres of National Forest. 107 million acres of BLM managed wilderness. Then there are state parks, state forests, state protected wildlife areas. That's just places to hike and camp and be outside. Then there is the commercial stuff that people like to do, like shopping and amusement parks. We've got landmarks galore to see. There's the great lakes and the great salt lake, there's vacationing in Hawaii, in Puerto Rico, Florida Keys. New York City, San Francisco, Hollywood. Some of us have dreams of seeing every MLB field, or every NFL stadium. That alone is thousands of dollars of airfare or days of driving. We've also go the Worlds Largest Ball of Twine in Minnesota. And someone carved some faces into a Mountain. The Hoover Dam. The Grand Canyon. There's a pretty famous ice cream place in Vermont, a crappy chocolate factory in Pennsylvania. Some people like to go to New England and shop for old furniture. There's world class museums in New York, Chicago, Washington DC. We can go to Cape Canaveral and look at Space Stuff.  We've got that weird ass arch thing in St Louis and hundreds of microbrewers. We've got the Golden Gate Bridge, the Space Needle, and if we run out of landmarks, breweries, national parks, mountains to climb, places to ski, beaches to hang out on, we can go to an amusement park. We've got tons of those. And then there is boating and golfing and tennis. 

Or we can pay a lot of money for airfare, go through the passport process, spend twice as much, and see a tiny portion of Europe. Airfare to Africa is absurdly expensive. Airfare to asia is cheap for me, but for someone from the east coast, it's going to be more. It's just not affordable for a lot of people. 

Quote

 

When they travel abroad and are being asked where are they from, [Americans] almost always reply with the city or state they're in, as if everyone in the world knows about U.S. geography by default. I have yet to meet any person other than Americans that would do this when asked the same question. - rafoberto

 

And yet if we don't know where Bristol is, Americans are automatically stupid and devoid of geography. The US has very different (proud) regions and a Texan doesn't want people to confuse him with a New Yorker. And for some weird reason, Alaskans and Hawaiians like to put their state first, probably because we just haven't been a part of the US as long. (There are still people living who remembered statehood.) 

Quote

 

I don't understand the obsession with heritage. To me, if you have no relation to the culture you are from you don't get to say that you are from that culture. - TenNinetythree

 

A lot of communities were settled by people from one region or country. They have festivals to celebrate their past or culture. It became tradition. The entire country minus Native Americans are descended from people who immigrated. There is no one "US Culture" that ties us all together, other than our propensity for marketing and consumption. A lot of what europeans mistake as being "obsessed with heritage" is our own version of local cultures, I guess. Or maybe it's our nature to pick a tribe? I mean, we also make a big deal over which NFL/MLB/NHL/NBA team we support, and which political team of the same machine we choose. Maybe it is strange, I don't know. I do know that my grandmother was born in the US to parents that fled from Poland, and parents tend to pass down things like knowledge and food choices to their children.

Quote

 

The spacing. I know the US is a huge area (and of course big cramped cities like NYC are exceptions), but the size of the roads and parking lots just seemed really strange as a Central European. - musland

 

This kind of bothers me too. And our interstate highway system is crumbling and should slowly be replaced with light rail or hyperloops. But politics/money/economy. 

Our Money:

Quote

Do you guys really leave money on the table when you are done at a restaurant? Or is that just something in movies and TV shows? -TalosOurSavior

Yep, sometimes it's just a tip for the waiter, but sometimes we'll pay for the whole meal with cash on the table.

We even have credit cards now! 

Quote

The price of things never being the real price. You go to the store, this thing costs X, then you go pay and you add tax. You go to the bar for a beer to cool off, the beer costs X... but noooooooo, now you have to tip! - blindedbyhindsight

OMG THIS IS SO ANNOYING WHEN I LEAVE MY STATE. What the hell, lower 48 minus Vermont? 

Other sacred American traditions:

Quote

Why they haven't switched to the metric system yet. IT MAKES SO MUCH MORE SENSE. - ilopuch

Imperial units, FTW!

UGH Tell me about it. Then again, wth is up with a stone? 

Quote

Met some Swiss guys at a house party after a mutual friend's wedding. They couldn't believe that we were all actually drinking out of red Solo cups, it blew their minds. They kept on taking pictures and saying "It's just like the movies!" - DillSe

They are cheap and environmentally destructive, but no dishes to wash, no broken glass, and now they are kind of thing because irony or whatever. 

Everyday life:

Quote

You're very friendly, like, talking to strangers on elevators friendly. It's confusing for those of us who are used to staring straight ahead and pretending everyone else in that confined space doesn't exist. - phedre

Please don't talk to me on an elevator. This is not universally understood to be bad? WAT

Quote

The few Americans I have been in contact with for more than a few minutes seem to be very uncomfortable with silence, personal space and stuff like that. - triste_est

This is unfortunately becoming widespread. I hate it. And I hate the judgemental looks from restaurant staff when my partner and I eat in silence or look at our phones. We live together. I don't need to talk to him constantly, otherwise we repeat things and I hate that. 

 

Quote

All the commercials for lawyers. On the side of the road... In television... In hotel rooms... - hn-t

My grandfather called it the death of the professional. I don't know why we do that. It's annoying. It's probably because of our obsession with marketing. 

Quote

Yep. "And so, so many pharmaceutical ads." - Prophage7

So many ads, period. 

Quote

American toilet stalls: why is there a massive gap under the door, above the door, and even vertically alongside the lock. Now let's talk about the toilet itself. Why is the pan so flat and the water so high? - echocharlieone

Money. Inexpensive materials, the cheapest toilets. At least we occasionally stock our free public toilets with toilet paper. 

Quote

I know a guy from Germany and he was in awe at how long our lines are at the supermarket. He said in Germany everyone bags their own stuff and the cashier just scans it and slides it. The lines move really fast. - TDeath21

I scan my own stuff and bag it myself. The lines for the people to do it for you are slow and the other people are slow and generally annoying. It comes down to money. The person who owns the grocery store knows that people will wait, so they don't hire enough people to work. 

Quote

Turning right on a red. So many times have I been scared I'm about to be run over. - Reddit user

And apparently Jeremy Clarkson called this "America's only contribution to Western civilization." So, yay?

This is not acceptable in certain places, like New York City. And yeah, you get used to the feeling of almost constant death. If you don't like it, you can buy a car. 'MERCA (pretend there is a .gif of someone rolling their eyes here.)  

Quote

There are a lot of squirrels. - SthrnCrss

Yup. And the ones on college campuses in the midwest are HUGE. Like, cat sized. 

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DaniLouisiana

For the lamb lovers:Lamb and tomatoe flatbreads-just like adult pizzas! I'm in cilantro soap and anti root beer group. I don't as a rule like lamb either but flatbreads yum.

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MarblesMom
On 10/17/2016 at 7:02 PM, Maggie Mae said:

He said in Germany everyone bags their own stuff and the cashier just scans it and slides it. The lines move really fast.

Holy crap, this.  We could not bag it fast enough!  I am sure we annoyed everyone else in line behind us with our inept American bagging skillz.

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Dizzy
Grimalkin
50 minutes ago, MarblesMom said:

Holy crap, this.  We could not bag it fast enough!  I am sure we annoyed everyone else in line behind us with our inept American bagging skillz.

Have you never shopped at Aldi? Which coincidentally is owned by a German- I think.

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MarblesMom

Yes, we have an Aldi not too far away.  Once I figured out how to get the cart out, I was good.  Shopped, bagged and out the door.

The cashier did a great tutorial as he scanned my stuff, as well.  

I like Aldi.  Now.... if we could only get a Trader Joe's, my life would be complete!
 

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WhatWouldJohnCrichtonDo?

In the west, we have WinCo. (Washington, Idaho, Nevada, California, and Oregon.) The lines at WinCo have two conveyor belts for items that have been paid for, so that customers bagging their purchases don't have to be as fast as the cashier.

This is the only picture I could find:

Spoiler

images.jpg

 

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Dizzy
Grimalkin
On October 17, 2016 at 7:02 PM, Maggie Mae said:

 

 

The ways we travel:

We've got 84.9 million acres of National Parks. 193 million acres of National Forest. 107 million acres of BLM managed wilderness. Then there are state parks, state forests, state protected wildlife areas. That's just places to hike and camp and be outside. Then there is the commercial stuff that people like to do, like shopping and amusement parks. We've got landmarks galore to see. There's the great lakes and the great salt lake, there's vacationing in Hawaii, in Puerto Rico, Florida Keys. New York City, San Francisco, Hollywood. Some of us have dreams of seeing every MLB field, or every NFL stadium. That alone is thousands of dollars of airfare or days of driving. We've also go the Worlds Largest Ball of Twine in Minnesota. And someone carved some faces into a Mountain. The Hoover Dam. The Grand Canyon. There's a pretty famous ice cream place in Vermont, a crappy chocolate factory in Pennsylvania. Some people like to go to New England and shop for old furniture. There's world class museums in New York, Chicago, Washington DC. We can go to Cape Canaveral and look at Space Stuff.  We've got that weird ass arch thing in St Louis and hundreds of microbrewers. We've got the Golden Gate Bridge, the Space Needle, and if we run out of landmarks, breweries, national parks, mountains to climb, places to ski, beaches to hang out on, we can go to an amusement park. We've got tons of those. And then there is boating and golfing and tennis. 

Or we can pay a lot of money for airfare, go through the passport process, spend twice as much, and see a tiny portion of Europe. Airfare to Africa is absurdly expensive. Airfare to asia is cheap for me, but for someone from the east coast, it's going to be more. It's just not affordable for a lot of people. 

And yet if we don't know where Bristol is, Americans are automatically stupid and devoid of geography. The US has very different (proud) regions and a Texan doesn't want people to confuse him with a New Yorker. And for some weird reason, Alaskans and Hawaiians like to put their state first, probably because we just haven't been a part of the US as long. (There are still people living who remembered statehood.) 

A lot of communities were settled by people from one region or country. They have festivals to celebrate their past or culture. It became tradition. The entire country minus Native Americans are descended from people who immigrated. There is no one "US Culture" that ties us all together, other than our propensity for marketing and consumption. A lot of what europeans mistake as being "obsessed with heritage" is our own version of local cultures, I guess. Or maybe it's our nature to pick a tribe? I mean, we also make a big deal over which NFL/MLB/NHL/NBA team we support, and which political team of the same machine we choose. Maybe it is strange, I don't know. I do know that my grandmother was born in the US to parents that fled from Poland, and parents tend to pass down things like knowledge and food choices to their children.

 

  *Standing up and slow clapping.

I love this so much! I would love to travel more  internationally but it just isn't reasonable with six people. And I want my kids to go to college, and I hate debt, it gives me anxiety. If I lived in France, going to Spain is a hop, skip, and a jump away. We have lots of French relatives. One year when they came over they thought they would start in Florida, go to NYC for a day then hop over to New Orleans. That didn't work out to well. Coast to coast the continental United States is 3,000 miles. And people just don't realize how big Alaska actually is. I get really tired of the dumb American schtick. We have plenty of problems and I don't think we are above any criticisms, but I have met plenty of ignorant Europeans. I don't think we have the market cornerd. It's absurd to think because you watched some sitcoms and Duggar episodes you know all about America and Americans. I have watched Shameless and Eastenders, I don't think that's an accurate portrayal of all of Brittan. I hear this stuff a lot. 

25 minutes ago, WhatWouldJohnCrichtonDo? said:

In the west, we have WinCo. (Washington, Idaho, Nevada, California, and Oregon.) The lines at WinCo have two conveyor belts for items that have been paid for, so that customers bagging their purchases don't have to be as fast as the cashier.

This is the only picture I could find:

  Hide contents

images.jpg

 

   We used to have Cub Foods which seems very similar.

      More and more independent grocery stores are popping up around me, though they all have baggers.

@MarblesMom your Avatar completely throws me off. I HARDLY RECONIZE YOU ANYMORE!

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MarblesMom
10 minutes ago, Grimalkin said:

have watched Shameless and Eastenders, I don't think that's an accurate portrayal of all of Brittan.

Please do not leave out Coupling, one of my fave shows ever.  Or Are You Being Served?

I should just take my avatar back to the happy-slappy Pooh Bear, so you know who I am @Grimalkin

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zee_four
On 10/13/2016 at 7:17 PM, HerNameIsBuffy said:

In a glass there is vanilla ice cream and root beer is poured over it.  Served with spoon and straw.

What do you call this treat?

I just found out my name for this was unheard of by some lovely people I consider highly cultured snd awesome...so now I'm wondering if I'm the weirdo.

Nah, I know the proper name - just thought it would be fun as I'm generally curious as to the consensus on this.

I've always called it a root beer float, didn't grow up hearing something else or have come across any substantial deviation as I moved around as an adult.

However my last job was at a 50s style diner. Uniform was a pink bowling shirt, mandatory red lipstick, nostalgic buttons at least 15, black pedal pushers... then I'd usually add cat eye glasses to top it off.

 

There we called it a Black Cow. It's  one of those kitche supposedly retro terms that I highly doubt were even common place. My dad's straight out of that era, graduated high school in 64 college in 68 then Vietnam. He still only listens to 60s music, has his old coke bottle glasses and his Varsity letter sweater. He never heard it called that by anyone back then except the waitresses from the diners.

On 10/14/2016 at 6:27 AM, Palimpsest said:

The most common mistake people make is to spread Vegemite and Marmite as thickly as Nutella or peanut butter.  Holy salt overload.

Try a very thin scrape (barely noticeable) on buttered toast and eat with scrambled eggs.  Or, especially if you are a carnivore, use it in cooking.  Marmite, not Vegemite, is a secret ingredient of mine in a really good pork and apple stew recipe.   American guests love it and ask for the recipe but they make faces when I mention the Marmite.   About 1/2 a tsp is also good to flavor beef stews and pot roasts but I haven't made those recently.  Tip - if using either Marmite or Vegemite in cooking leave out the salt completely or go very easy on it.

Vegemite and Marmite are acquired tastes. ;)

Vegemite  is best as tiger toast (butter spread on the entire slice then add thin stripes of the Vegemite) That and Wheetbix the Aussie brekkie of champs.

(Confession I'm actually a half Irish Canadian half Native Hawai'ian Polynesian who grew up in the Colorado mountains... but I was engaged to an Aussie and had moved there to work and after the wedding become naturalized.... long story but I'm back State side and he's still in Oz. gotta watch out for those crazy Aussie freestyle ski blokes....)

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Tired
CyborgKin

Never had root beer, but ice cream with a softdrink is a spider.  Had one the other night.  With added maple syrup.  Not sure whose idea that was.

A bit of vegemite on toast on occasion is alright.  Or add it to a croissant with cheese.

Kangaroo sausages are pretty decent, though nothing beats good chicken sausages.

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Dizzy
Grimalkin

I forgot to answer Buffy's question. Root Beer float is what we call it, it's one of my mom's faveorit deserts. My dad called it a black cow. I call it revolting and a waste of ice cream and root beer.

       Regarding Marmite or if you prefer Vegimite. It's delicious very thinly spread on butterd toast. Someone else mentioned this up thread. My husband likes it on cream crackers with butter. It's darn expensive here. 

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NewOrleansLady
On 10/13/2016 at 8:50 PM, Fascinated said:

I've never heard of a Black Cow!  (Now, a Brown Cow I can get behind.) 

If you get behind it better wear high boots and a gas mask

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NewOrleansLady
On 10/13/2016 at 9:57 PM, Palimpsest said:

There really is a root beer tree - sans cans:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sassafras

Mine is at the back of the yard (we have just over an acre) and is sort of ugly.  It amuses me though.

 
 

Ground sassafras is called FILE POWDER.  It is used in cooking gumbo.  Bay leaves are the whole leaf and are used in all types of creole and cajun cooking.  You must pick out the whole leaves before you serve the dish.  It can lodge in your throat and not be so nice.

 

Zatarain's (a New Orleans company that McCormick bought out) produces a root beer extract-It is a summertime treat for most kids

 

On 10/13/2016 at 11:11 PM, SilverBeach said:

Kahlua and milk or cream is a white Russian. Don't ask me how I know, but don't get between me and my Kahlua. Or amaretto.

I do not like cilantro, lamb, or anything peanut butter unless it is a Reese cup. 

 

Love amaretto and pineapple juice.  Just yummy and makes me feel like one of those cordial drinking ladies with the outstretched pinkie.

Edited by NewOrleansLady

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NewOrleansLady
On 10/13/2016 at 11:54 PM, WhatWouldJohnCrichtonDo? said:

@Karma--I opened it. I smelled it. I still haven't tasted it. :pb_lol:

Taste it and take one for the team.

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