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lilah

Homeschooling fundie mom rants against evil American Library Asociation

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lilah

Those evil librarians are promoting an evil gay agenda. And apparently even books like The Whipping Boy or The Midwives apprentices are considered trash.

 

I want to troll this woman so hard and point out the most recent Newbery Award winning book is about grandmother and son who go to church and serve at a homeless shelter. Obviously part of an evil agenda.

 

http://deeprootsathome.com/books-unhealthy-for-children-recent-newbery-caldecott-ya/

 

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Terrie

Apparently "brooding" themes are as bad as gay ones. Huh?

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Wine time!
crawfishgirl

Lori Alexander, the Godly mentor of the internet, has this blog listed on the side of her page under "Blogs I Love".  Enough said.

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paganbaby

I can't find the full quote, but I read a quote by a librarian years ago that went something like, "We have something here to offend everyone. If you can't find something in the library that offends you, please let us know."

I've learned a lot from books that offended me, even ones whose content I still find offensive. I can't imagine my childhood and teen years without a library. There were times when that building felt like my only friend. I feel so sorry for a kid who isn't allowed to rummage around in a good one.

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klynn

I just can not get over people like this. Something offends them, therefore we must all boycott it.  Shut up already. 

I enjoy the show "Vikings" on the History channel.  However, I don't think it's appropriate for my 4 year old daughter to see (too much sex and blood) so I don't watch it until she is in bed asleep.  Crazy, I know. 

I am so sick of these self-righteous assholes thinking they know it all, and what is best for everyone.  You know what offends me?  Psychotic far right wing Christian fundie assholes.  So, I stay away from them, and make fun of them on FJ.

Wow.  I'm more fired up about this than I realized.

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Happy
PennySycamore

On her list of worthwhile books, does she know that some of these books had LGBTQ authors?  I know that the author of Goodnight Moon was bisexual and lived with her partner for 10 years in Greenwich Village.  There were probably others.

She does list Sarah Maxwell (barf!) and a bunch of other books that would likely bore today's kids stiff (Little Lord Fauntleroy, anyone?)  There's nothing offensive about the Amelia Bedelia books except how fucking stupid they are.  I hated reading those books to my kids.

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Ungodly Grandma
1 hour ago, paganbaby said:

I can't find the full quote, but I read a quote by a librarian years ago that went something like, "We have something here to offend everyone. If you can't find something in the library that offends you, please let us know."

I've learned a lot from books that offended me, even ones whose content I still find offensive. I can't imagine my childhood and teen years without a library. There were times when that building felt like my only friend. I feel so sorry for a kid who isn't allowed to rummage around in a good one.

To me as a kid, being deprived of the library would have been almost like losing one of my senses. 

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Tired
Iamhispurity
16 minutes ago, PennySycamore said:

On her list of worthwhile books, does she know that some of these books had LGBTQ authors?  I know that the author of Goodnight Moon was bisexual and lived with her partner for 10 years in Greenwich Village.  There were probably others.

She does list Sarah Maxwell (barf!) and a bunch of other books that would likely bore today's kids stiff (Little Lord Fauntleroy, anyone?)  There's nothing offensive about the Amelia Bedelia books except how fucking stupid they are.  I hated reading those books to my kids.

I LOVED the Little Lord and The Little Princess as a kid! Those are great classics!

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paganbaby
6 minutes ago, klynn said:

I just can not get over people like this. Something offends them, therefore we must all boycott it.  Shut up already. 

I enjoy the show "Vikings" on the History channel.  However, I don't think it's appropriate for my 4 year old daughter to see (too much sex and blood) so I don't watch it until she is in bed asleep.  Crazy, I know. 

I am so sick of these self-righteous assholes thinking they know it all, and what is best for everyone.  You know what offends me?  Psychotic far right wing Christian fundie assholes.  So, I stay away from them, and make fun of them on FJ.

Wow.  I'm more fired up about this than I realized.

Years ago, someone wrote Stephen King berating him because a TV adaptation of "Salem's Lot" scared his child. King replied that his own children hadn't been scared because they hadn't been allowed to watch. They were too young, so King did the responsible thing and policed their viewing.

I never got into "X-Files" mostly because I couldn't watch it with little kids around, and at that point in my life there always seemed to be at least one little kid around.

Parenting is sometimes about you policing what your kid sees and reads until they're old enough to make their own decisions, not about removing that stuff from the rest of the world.

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desertvixen

@crawfishgirl, I can see why Lori would like her - lots of "health" posts, lots of "gay agenda" posts,

Although she seems to have A LOT of guest posts, they are all clearly identified as guest posts and notes that they are being shared with permission.

This one on the Duggar scandal (it is a guest post) was pretty good: http://deeprootsathome.com/could-it-happen-in-your-home-the-duggar-scandal/

But then I hit this and had to laugh.  It kind of goes against the whole tone of the advice.  (There's a lot of other good advice, like listening to your kids, talking to them when you notice things wrong, satisfying natural curiosity with age-appropriate information, not forcing children to show physical affection, and so on.)

Quote

Properly educate your child on their bodies with proper verbiage. Does saying p—- or v—– embarrass you? My suggestion is to get over it and get over it fast. Giving correct bodily names inhibits an abuser to keep a victim quiet if an incident should occur.

There's also this kind of weird post, where she addresses what I would consider a legit issue (sexualization of little girls, the tiara and toddler deal) : http://deeprootsathome.com/why-have-we-stopped-protecting-our-daughters/

But then lumps in Mary Lou Retton with the pageant crowd - there's a pic of her doing the splits on a balance beam, and the writer complains about girls STRETCHING and doing the splits at a CHEERLEADING deal:

Quote

More than a few at one point lay in the aisles with their legs up in the air doing splits (stretching), exposing themselves without a second thought. Mothers were fussing with their hairdos and giving last minute touch-ups as they got ready for the next routine, loudly urging them to ‘show ’em your stuff’.

You know, by "show 'em your stuff", those moms probably meant their cheerleading and gymnastic moves.  I mean, not that there aren't issues in both of those sports that should be addressed but this isn't the one that drives me.

Oh, and Santa is bad because he promotes "works righteousness", and oh no, the blurring of fact and fiction.  It's also a guest post.  http://deeprootsathome.com/the-santa-question-what-do-you-tell-your-children/

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Nervous
Audrey2

Now we are on a hot button issue for me. Libraries need to be bastions of free thought. Librarians are taught to select books, based on positive reviews from trusted sources, like Booklist and Library/School Library Journal, and what gaps exist in the library collection. Instead of boycotting or banning books, this mom can guide her children when choosing books, but don't allow her to impose her choices on others. I was lucky that my mom took me to the library regularly as a child, and allowed me to read freely the books in the children's department. So many people have attempted to ban books, not just the Harry Potte, Judy Blume,  and Daddy's Roommate types, but also other books most would see as innocuous, like Where the Sidewalk Ends, by Shel Silverstein.:my_angry:

The evil side of me would love to send someone into her library demanding for her favorite books to be banned, but I don't believe in that!

Public rant over, but I'll keep stewing!

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RosyDaisy

I love the library. In the public school I went to, we had 30 minutes of mandatory library time. I also spent countless hours at my local library. So, fuck this holier than thou bitch!

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desertvixen
Quote

@paganbaby

Parenting is sometimes about you policing what your kid sees and reads until they're old enough to make their own decisions, not about removing that stuff from the rest of the world.

Yes.  My 9 year old can understand this - some things are not for younger people.

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Mercer

Parents need to decide what's appropriate for their own children, and then use the difficult but still age-appropriate material as a springboard for family discussion and learning opportunities for the child.

Trying to get stuff banned so they don't have to actually parent their child through those issues is frankly just lazy.

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Season of life...

Sometimes I need a happy place to go to in my mind, and my choice is nearly always the little public library I loved as a child.

It's simple for me to revisit that wonderful place and time, because I was there nearly every other day. The cool silence, that certain smell, the stacks and rows of books waiting for me--the library was my church, and visiting it was a holy experience. I still feel an expectant hush before walking into a library.

While working in a public library as an adult, we would constantly have irate parents complain that we 'let' their children check out certain books. Our reponse was always, "They had their library card." Making sure your children are choosing appropriate materials is not the job of library staff--it's yours as a parent. With that card comes responsibilty. We did not want to police anyone's book choices. We had no secret agenda of indoctrination.

People would challenge items in our collection for a myriad of reasons. We would have to explain to angry patrons why we couldn't just yank a book from the collection. There was a process, including a committee, that would make the decision. Most of them were shocked we didn't censor these items simply on their say-so. 

Our library really celebrated banned book week every year. We had contests, displays and we would wear t-shirts with banned books proudly emblazoned in all their glory. It was a--perhaps not terribly subtle--FU to all those who took their complaints all the way up to the library board, and beyond, but who did not succeed in gutting our collection. 

People who are afraid of books are, in my opinion, poorer for their mindset. I refuse to be made a pauper alongside them.

 

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December

Because whenever children or adults read books, they have to agree with everything that happens in the story and copy it! There's no room for critical thinking or disagreement in literature! 

Can't wait to send this blog post to an evil librarian friend of mine. :pb_lol:

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Happy
PennySycamore

@Iamhispurity,  I picked Little Lord Fauntleroy out her list of worthwhile books just because I figure it as 19th or maybe early 20th century literature and it was one book on the list I recalled.  Many children's books of that vintage are a tough row to hoe for today's kids.  Actually that tends to be true of 19th century (and earlier)  books for adults as well.  The writing style is more complex or something than much of contemporary literature.  That said I love Jane Austin and Charles Dickens and I loved Silas Marner when we read this in 9th grade.  

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elliha
3 hours ago, PennySycamore said:

On her list of worthwhile books, does she know that some of these books had LGBTQ authors?  I know that the author of Goodnight Moon was bisexual and lived with her partner for 10 years in Greenwich Village.  There were probably others.

She does list Sarah Maxwell (barf!) and a bunch of other books that would likely bore today's kids stiff (Little Lord Fauntleroy, anyone?)  There's nothing offensive about the Amelia Bedelia books except how fucking stupid they are.  I hated reading those books to my kids.

There are clear homo-erotic elements in Moby Dick in my view, that book seems to be OK though... 

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dairyfreelife

She's, interesting to say the least. 

Quote

Explicitly X-rated, pornographic descriptions of sex acts between children as young as preschool age are peppered throughout academic curricula as a means of furthering a way of life and belief system most of the American population rejects outright.

Why yes, America does reject the idea of sex acts between children. Was this ever a question? Oh, she means homosexuals? Then no, most of American does not reject consensual sexual activity between adults. X-rated porn is not shown to young children in schools. Sorry to ruin that illusion, but X-rated material is only for legal adults to view. 

That evil Gay Agenda is everywhere y'all! http://deeprootsathome.com/gay-agenda-permeates-public-schools-with-childrens-books/

She linked to this site as one of her sources http://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2009/12/glsening_young_children.html

Quote

Kevin Jennings was appointed "Safe School Czar." The former teacher's noted expertise concerns the issue of bullying homosexual youths.

Parents can rest securely in the knowledge that while in school, children are safe and sound thanks to Obama's appointee, the founder and executive director of the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN -- pronounced "glisten"). Kevin Jennings, together with educational organizations like the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) and the National Education Association (NEA), has made a top priority the rooting out of detrimental childhood influences, beginning with the Bible and religious imagery.

 Yes, it is just so terrible to make sure children feel safe in schools. How dare public schools in a country with freedom of religion as one of the essential freedoms granted to all its citizens not allow one religion to take control? 

Quote

GLSEN's primary objective is educating straight children to be nondiscriminatory toward gays and encouraging gay kids to express their sexual predilection with pride. Agenda mavens, toiling away to obliterate prejudice for school-aged homophiles in public schools, justify banning Bibles, prohibiting sacred holidays, and tossing in the bonfire artwork tinged with what secularists consider psychotically inspired religious themes.

Since none of the article linked on this site work I cannot verify any of this, but I am just not buying into of it. Never known a school actually ban the Bible, just from converting others in school and reading it during inappropriate times and no one is prohibiting anyone from celebrating sacred holidays. You just want everyone else to be forced to celebrate your religious holiday too. The start of this paragraph does not sound bad to me, but I am their nightmare. 

She also links to this site: http://clashdaily.com/2014/02/leave-kids-alone-us-schools-teach-creepy-stuff-8yr-olds/

I was disappointed to discover the link to the information about Planned Parenthood sex parties was not available. 

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Ungodly Grandma

The Little Princess and Anne of Green Gables, A Wrinkle in Time, Beverly Cleary, Edward Eager,the Little House books, on and on.

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bjr70
Now we are on a hot button issue for me. Libraries need to be bastions of free thought. Librarians are taught to select books, based on positive reviews from trusted sources, like Booklist and Library/School Library Journal, and what gaps exist in the library collection. Instead of boycotting or banning books, this mom can guide her children when choosing books, but don't allow her to impose her choices on others. I was lucky that my mom took me to the library regularly as a child, and allowed me to read freely the books in the children's department. So many people have attempted to ban books, not just the Harry Potte, Judy Blume,  and Daddy's Roommate types, but also other books most would see as innocuous, like Where the Sidewalk Ends, by Shel Silverstein.:my_angry:

The evil side of me would love to send someone into her library demanding for her favorite books to be banned, but I don't believe in that!

Public rant over, but I'll keep stewing!

I'm working on a masters in Library Information Science at the moment, and this is drilled into you in every class. Librarians are taught how to deal with people like this and that our defense of the first amendment and providing access to information is essential to a free society. The ALA does stellar work on this.

Have none of these people realized that the minute you try to ban a book it becomes the book everyone wants to read?

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princessmahina
9 hours ago, paganbaby said:

I can't find the full quote, but I read a quote by a librarian years ago that went something like, "We have something here to offend everyone. If you can't find something in the library that offends you, please let us know."

I've learned a lot from books that offended me, even ones whose content I still find offensive. I can't imagine my childhood and teen years without a library. There were times when that building felt like my only friend. I feel so sorry for a kid who isn't allowed to rummage around in a good one.

I've never gotten offended in a library. I should probably spend more time there.

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FormerlyFundyLite
8 hours ago, PennySycamore said:

 There's nothing offensive about the Amelia Bedelia books except how fucking stupid they are.  I hated reading those books to my kids.

My mom is dyslexic. I used to make the poor woman read Amelia Bedelia to me all the time. She finally started saying, "Amelia did [whatever she did]." When I complained that her name is Amelia Bedelia, Mom would say,  "Oh you can read! Good. You should read it to me."

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Antimony

:embarrassed: I did, and still do, find Amelia Bedelia to be completely hilarious. 

But I also cracked up over the idea of putting a dollhouse desk in the fish tank at work so the fish can...school.

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Astonished
Soulhuntress

The library or her church library or the internet or really anything is as 'safe' as you make it.  To mommy dearest, You are the parent.  Set the tone and raise kids who know their limits.

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