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GOP wants schools to out gay kids to thier parents.


NjoyingNsanity

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The text calls for a school counselor, medical official or administrator to advise parents when their children’s “circumstance present immediate and urgent safety issues involving human sexuality,†the AP reports. It’s referred to as the “Don’t Say Gay†bill and it’s part of a similar Campfield-sponsored bill from 2011 that failed in the House, according to the media report.

Beyond homosexuality, what is an urgent safety issue involving human sexuality. Counselors already have to report to law enforcement if children are being sexually violated by adults. What if a teenage couple is having sex? Does this have to be reported? What if a teenage girl comes to a doctor for birth control? SHe is being responsible. Should the doctor report to the parents? What if the doctor examines the girl and discovers the patient isn't a virgin? Should that be reported?

I realize that parents have to make decisions for their children but we don't own our kids. They have a right to privacy. This bill will make it more difficult for teens to get birth control information.

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Thats wrong. It is up to the kid to decide when they want to tell their parents.

Teachers should stay out of students love lives (unless a 14 year old is dating a 45 year old or they suspect abuse)

Exactly what safety issues come up with a gay couple? Someone witnessing two boys kissing?

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Sometimes I find it really hard to believe that the different states are all part of the same country.

I just can't imagine some of these things being taken seriously at all. Is this really a mainstream sort of view in the South ? How about the various anti-birth control measures, or overt public anti-homosexuality, or the openly hard core fanatical religion.

How much of that is a stereotype and how much is commonly acceptable ?

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From the article - "Ms. Campfield characterized homosexuality as a health and safety danger during a Wednesday press conference with reporters, the AP reported."

How in the HELL is being gay a "health and safety danger"? Oh, wait, I get it - it's "dangerous" to the ultra right wing Hypochristian agenda!

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From the article - "Ms. Campfield characterized homosexuality as a health and safety danger during a Wednesday press conference with reporters, the AP reported."

How in the HELL is being gay a "health and safety danger"? Oh, wait, I get it - it's "dangerous" to the ultra right wing Hypochristian agenda!

What is a sure safety danger to these kids is outing them to their parents.

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Thats wrong. It is up to the kid to decide when they want to tell their parents.

Teachers should stay out of students love lives (unless a 14 year old is dating a 45 year old or they suspect abuse)

Exactly what safety issues come up with a gay couple? Someone witnessing two boys kissing?

Agree!!

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I just read a news posting on Facebook that was shared by a friend about a 15-year-old boy that killed himself because he was bullied mercilessly for being gay. That is what this utter stupidity will lead to. There is also an increased risk for abuse from parents who are anti-gay. They do not care for these kids at all. They only care about proving how "righteous" they are. :angry-steamingears:

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Sometimes I find it really hard to believe that the different states are all part of the same country.

I just can't imagine some of these things being taken seriously at all. Is this really a mainstream sort of view in the South ? How about the various anti-birth control measures, or overt public anti-homosexuality, or the openly hard core fanatical religion.

How much of that is a stereotype and how much is commonly acceptable ?

Please note that this is a GOP-sponsored bill. There is no indication that the majority of Tennesseeans would support it, let alone a majority of Southerners. To me it is a greater indictment of the Republican panderers than it is of the state in which they happen to find themselves located.

So my short answer to your question is, it's a stereotype, one which many of us lifelong Southerners abominate and would like for people to stop perpetuating. I don't know if you live in the US or not, but yeah, it's a big country, there are all sorts of crazy ideas. Admittedly there are a lot of Republicans and a lot of fundamentalist Christians in the south, and these sorts of opinions are right up their alley. But I would venture to say that they are the loudmouths, whose voices are heard above the din, and that many Southerners don't care one way or another, or actively dislike and campaign against such narrow views.

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Please note that this is a GOP-sponsored bill. There is no indication that the majority of Tennesseeans would support it, let alone a majority of Southerners. To me it is a greater indictment of the Republican panderers than it is of the state in which they happen to find themselves located.

So my short answer to your question is, it's a stereotype, one which many of us lifelong Southerners abominate and would like for people to stop perpetuating. I don't know if you live in the US or not, but yeah, it's a big country, there are all sorts of crazy ideas. Admittedly there are a lot of Republicans and a lot of fundamentalist Christians in the south, and these sorts of opinions are right up their alley. But I would venture to say that they are the loudmouths, whose voices are heard above the din, and that many Southerners don't care one way or another, or actively dislike and campaign against such narrow views.

I was born and raised in the South and I could not disagree more. Look at what candidates win by landslide elections and what laws are voted in without protest. Yes, not all Southerners are bigots, but the majority? Yes. In my experience, yes. Only it's referred to as being a "traditional Southern man/lady." The bigotry and chosen ignorance that pervades the South is dressed up in cute phrases, good manners and served with a tall glass of sweet tea.

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circumstance present immediate and urgent safety issues involving human sexuality,

If you forgot your safe word, say?

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Please note that this is a GOP-sponsored bill. There is no indication that the majority of Tennesseeans would support it, let alone a majority of Southerners. To me it is a greater indictment of the Republican panderers than it is of the state in which they happen to find themselves located.

So my short answer to your question is, it's a stereotype, one which many of us lifelong Southerners abominate and would like for people to stop perpetuating. I don't know if you live in the US or not, but yeah, it's a big country, there are all sorts of crazy ideas. Admittedly there are a lot of Republicans and a lot of fundamentalist Christians in the south, and these sorts of opinions are right up their alley. But I would venture to say that they are the loudmouths, whose voices are heard above the din, and that many Southerners don't care one way or another, or actively dislike and campaign against such narrow views.

Wasn't trying to be offensive it was a genuine question. Obviously not everyone who lives in the South is going to agree with this sort of thing - but I'm asking if it is generally acceptable to have these sorts of far-right beliefs, and to think they should be part of public policy.

I live in an extremely liberal area of an extremely liberal state - and we still have our share of far-right fanatics -because not everyone is the same- but it is hard to imagine someone proposing this sort of thing and it getting much agreement. Reading on FJ the regional differences just really stand out - so I was asking about how socially mainstream those views are.

eta - it is a state bill, not federal, that is why I am asking specifically about that region.

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If this passes, it's going to get some kid killed. Either by the parents themselves or thrown onto the street (which happens all too often even when the child comes out voluntarily)

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I was born and raised in the South and I could not disagree more. Look at what candidates win by landslide elections and what laws are voted in without protest. Yes, not all Southerners are bigots, but the majority? Yes. In my experience, yes. Only it's referred to as being a "traditional Southern man/lady." The bigotry and chosen ignorance that pervades the South is dressed up in cute phrases, good manners and served with a tall glass of sweet tea.

I was not addressing bigotry specifically, but I think that's a stereotype too. Opinions become a stereotype because people accept them and aren't willing to dig deeperto uncover the truth of the matter. I, also a Southerner born and bred who's lived here my whole life, do encounter bigoted people, but I encounter many, many, many more who aren't. I"m unwilling to accept that the political party in power actually "represents" the view of masses,. The masses don't vote. If you add the number of people who don't vote to the number who vote for more progressive parties, they outweigh the conservative loudmouths. The GOP know how to marshall their minions, but they don't own everyone's heart and/or mind, or even most people's.

Clearly we move in different circles. I see plenty of opposition, plenty of "protest," that I didn't see from the 1970s till now. Hell, the fact that the Democratic party even still exists in my state is a step forward from the mid-1980s, when it was on death's doorstep; and it is making surprising strides. And while I don't know a lot of people whom I would style a "traditional Southern man/lady" as you call them, the ones I do know don't vote GOP. Why? Because they don't associate themselves with those views.

I do approve of good manners, but I'll take my tea with Splenda. :P

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Wasn't trying to be offensive it was a genuine question. Obviously not everyone who lives in the South is going to agree with this sort of thing - but I'm asking if it is generally acceptable to have these sorts of far-right beliefs, and to think they should be part of public policy.

I live in an extremely liberal area of an extremely liberal state - and we still have our share of far-right fanatics -because not everyone is the same- but it is hard to imagine someone proposing this sort of thing and it getting much agreement. Reading on FJ the regional differences just really stand out - so I was asking about how socially mainstream those views are.

eta - it is a state bill, not federal, that is why I am asking specifically about that region.

No worries, I wasn't offended. :D I just often run into people who have never met anyone from the south and can't believe we aren't all monolithically fundy NRA-lovers who eat possum and drink shine.

"Generally acceptable"? Well, if you ask me, where I'm located, no, it isn't, but perhaps others have a different experience. Often, I think these kinds of things just come up so the lawmaker can get his name in the paper and on the radar as an uber-conservative with whom the real right-wingers will feel safe. But then you never hear of the bill again and find it died someplace, or was tabled, or was quietly withdrawn. I can't speak to Tennessee specifically, but no, I don't think you are going to find this bill popping up in statehouses across the south.

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Please note that this is a GOP-sponsored bill. There is no indication that the majority of Tennesseeans would support it, let alone a majority of Southerners. To me it is a greater indictment of the Republican panderers than it is of the state in which they happen to find themselves located.

So my short answer to your question is, it's a stereotype, one which many of us lifelong Southerners abominate and would like for people to stop perpetuating. I don't know if you live in the US or not, but yeah, it's a big country, there are all sorts of crazy ideas. Admittedly there are a lot of Republicans and a lot of fundamentalist Christians in the south, and these sorts of opinions are right up their alley. But I would venture to say that they are the loudmouths, whose voices are heard above the din, and that many Southerners don't care one way or another, or actively dislike and campaign against such narrow views.

I agree that we can't paint all Southerners (or Northerners or Westerners) with one broad brush. However, one thing is pretty obvious, and that's the fact that the GOP in the South is becoming more and more backwards and extremist as much of the rest of the country is becoming more progressive, especially with regard to social issues. Unless the national Republican party decides it's okay to remain a minority party for the foreseeable future, they'll eventually have to start building up and pumping money into the campaigns of more moderate candidates. But these nuts are being elected into office by real constituents, and that fact can’t be ignored.

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Southerners are the nicest people in the world -- who, under the surface, believe the most vile things imaginable.

If your car breaks down, you won't even have time to get out of the car before people are pulling over to help you. And they won't leave until you're fixed, the tow truck is there, or your ride comes or whatever. Doesn't matter what they had on their schedule that day.

But if you bring up religion or politics, you've done kicked the cottonmouth and he's gonna bite.

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Southerners are the nicest people in the world -- who, under the surface, believe the most vile things imaginable.

If your car breaks down, you won't even have time to get out of the car before people are pulling over to help you. And they won't leave until you're fixed, the tow truck is there, or your ride comes or whatever. Doesn't matter what they had on their schedule that day.

But if you bring up religion or politics, you've done kicked the cottonmouth and he's gonna bite.

*sigh*

Suffice to say (I think I"ve said this here before) THE most bigoted people I"ve ever met, without question, were people in small-town central Ohio. Having never met African-Americans, they felt all kinds of qualified to hold forth on them and their unsavory qualities and how shipping them back to Africa was the best idea ever.

What? Everyone in Ohio isn't like that? You mean like all Southerners aren't nice, and don't "believe the most vile things imaginable"?

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But if you tell Christians that they can't advocate against homsexuality, that totally persecution!11eleventy!!1! They're just abiding by Jesus's teachings, can't you tell? Not letting Christians protest homosexuality is against the 1st ammendment!!!11!!

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I do pediatric medical transcription. All of the reports for adolescents where anything regarding sexuality, sexual habits, eating disorders, drug use, etc. are all dictated by the physicians to be marked in bold type: This report contains confidential information and may not be released unless there is written permission from the patient.

It doesn't matter if the patient is 12 or 18. That report is still confidential and the physician will not discuss it with a parent unless it is okay with that patient.

Granted, this is in a more progressive area, but that's what HIPPA law dictates.

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I do pediatric medical transcription. All of the reports for adolescents where anything regarding sexuality, sexual habits, eating disorders, drug use, etc. are all dictated by the physicians to be marked in bold type: This report contains confidential information and may not be released unless there is written permission from the patient.

It doesn't matter if the patient is 12 or 18. That report is still confidential and the physician will not discuss it with a parent unless it is okay with that patient.

Granted, this is in a more progressive area, but that's what HIPPA law dictates.

Unfortunately HIPPA does not cover minors in that way. A minor child's records are open to their parents/legal guardians unless there are extenuating circumstances. http://www.hhs.gov/hipaafaq/personal/227.html

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Actually, that article states:

1. When the minor is the one who consents to care and the consent of the parent is not required under State or other applicable law.

Which is the situation the PP had concerns with.

Many states allow minor children to seek medical care without the consent of their parents, therefore they WOULD be protected.

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