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Cooking, Baking and Painting in Italia

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Anti-fasting lunch: Risotto with radicchio!

laPapessaGiovanna

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To continue this fantastic anti-fast/feast I decided to make my favourite risotto. I don't know if radicchio is known and grown somewhere else in the world,  btw this is it20151107_130046.thumb.jpg.c485e918d0b698 It's a sort of red salad typical of Veneto. I used more or less the amount you see in the pic.

Ingredients: radicchio, 2shallots, walnuts, butter, homemade bouillon, Carnaroli rice, half a glass of red wine, boiling water, Gorgonzola cheese, Parmigiano. 

I put some butter in the pan to melt, cut two shallots in very little piecess and add to the butter. 20151107_130825.thumb.jpg.84ab9c49ef2ee3

I cut the radicchio leaves and the walnuts in little pieces and add when tthe shallots turn gold.20151107_130830.thumb.jpg.f0f475271e2a14  I cooked it for 5-7 minutes, adding some spoonfuls of boiling water to avoid burning. When water evaporates I added rice and toasted for two minutes. 20151107_131730.thumb.jpg.d91fc03d1cacc8Then added the wine, a half glass of cabernet sauvignon. Then I kept the rice covered with boiling water for 15-16 minutes.20151107_131935.thumb.jpg.0b7e414fa33f41  At the end I tasted, added some salt, nutmeg,  pepper,  Gorgonzola cheese and Parmigiano. Stirred. Ready for the dish. 20151107_133450.thumb.jpg.e271c5c89a96d4 I am the worst food blogger ever :pb_redface: and forgot to take a pic of the dish...off to self flagellate, not, better leaving that to Stevhovah  :my_biggrin: 

Good lunch to everyone! 

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SpoonfulOSugar

Posted

This looks divine!  Mr.Spoon has started making risotto for me - I grew up in a meat and potatoes culture, and we are now expanding my food horizons exponentially.

Radicchio is familiar to me - but more as a salad (raw) leaf than as a cooked item.

Thanks for sharing.  If I were closer, I'd beg to come visit.  :D

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laPapessaGiovanna

Posted

This looks divine!  Mr.Spoon has started making risotto for me - I grew up in a meat and potatoes culture, and we are now expanding my food horizons exponentially.

Radicchio is familiar to me - but more as a salad (raw) leaf than as a cooked item.

Thanks for sharing.  If I were closer, I'd beg to come visit.  :D

You'd be welcome!

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Cartmann99

Posted

I've only ever had radicchio in salads. What main dishes would you recommend pairing this with? 

 Very interesting! :pb_smile:

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laPapessaGiovanna

Posted

I've only ever had radicchio in salads. What main dishes would you recommend pairing this with? 

 Very interesting! :pb_smile:

RRisotto is usually considered a main dish or a first course after which you can serve a second course of meat or cheese and vegetables.  Radicchio is fantastic to make sauces for pasta, roasted  or grilled and paired with some fatty meat or sausages. This is the season of radicchio so maybe I can show you some other radicchio based dishes in the next weeks if you like.

 

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Curious

Posted

I don't eat onion and I think a shallot is very similar to onion?   What would be a possible substitute for that?  I was thinking maybe garlic?

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laPapessaGiovanna

Posted

I don't eat onion and I think a shallot is very similar to onion?   What would be a possible substitute for that?  I was thinking maybe garlic?

 If you llike garlic very much you can sauté it with the butter and then take it away before adding the radicchio. If you want you can simply skip tha onion part.

Can I ask why?  Because if you, like my sister, simply hate the flavour and the consistency of onions don't worry because once cooked in this way (especially if cut really really little) they melt and vanish.

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Curious

Posted

Yep, I just hate the taste/texture of onions.   I can eat stuff with them in it as long as I can't taste the onion flavor.  Like I put a few pearl onions in when I make stew and by the time it's done they are soft and don't really taste oniony anymore.

If that's how it works with this recipe then it's not an issue for me.  Thanks!

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