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The Queen/Prince Philip


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1 hour ago, EmCatlyn said:

On behalf of those of us whose mothers suffered dementia before they died, I want to say that sometimes the death of the body feels like a release for them and for you, because the “never enough time” refers to when their minds were there.  I had no desire for my mom to live another day after she stopped recognizing people and could not carry on a conversation.  I know that she would have felt the same way.  I began mourning my mother three years before she passed away.  Even before that, she was not always “there.”  She never “met” my now husband, though he “met” her.  She never knew that her granddaughter had graduated from college or a dozen other small and big things that I would have wanted to share with her.  Even now, there are times when I think of telling her something or of how she would have an answer to a question that puzzles me.  But I was only a little sad when she died because the great sadness of loss was spread over the years.

My maternal grandma would’ve been 111 yesterday. She died in July 2003.  Her decline was such that I was praying in May 2003 to God if he was going to take her to do it and get it over with.  That’s how much she had declined in just a couple months from when she was first hospitalized in March of that year.  I was sad when she left but felt a lot of relief at the same time as she wasn’t suffering anymore. 

I felt that relief as well when the paternal grands went. Just seeing how ill they both were towards the end it really was something of a relief to see them go.

Edited by 47of74
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3 hours ago, tabitha2 said:

I dare you anyone to tell me there is no real love  and caring in that family. 

Right? So many little things all day long. They are definitely a family grieving. 

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1 hour ago, 47of74 said:

My maternal grandma would’ve been 111 yesterday. She died in July 2003.  Her decline was such that I was praying in May 2003 to God if he was going to take her to do it and get it over with.  That’s how much she had declined in just a couple months from when she was first hospitalized in March of that year.  I was sad when she left but felt a lot of relief at the same time as she wasn’t suffering anymore. 

I felt that relief as well when the paternal grands went. Just seeing how ill they both were towards the end it really was something of a relief to see them go.

It so much depends on circumstances. My maternal grandmother died suddenly of a massive stroke at only 78. My cousins' children lost their maternal grandmother to a head on car crash when she was only 60 years old. Those kinds of experiences are very different than losing a grandparent in their 90s. But a loss is a loss. And for the BRF, the Queen was the very core of their family in ways more complex than for the average family, as well. 

And I think losing a parent is hard regardless of their age. It's a loss of part of who you are. 

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1 hour ago, louisa05 said:

It so much depends on circumstances. My maternal grandmother died suddenly of a massive stroke at only 78. My cousins' children lost their maternal grandmother to a head on car crash when she was only 60 years old. Those kinds of experiences are very different than losing a grandparent in their 90s. But a loss is a loss. And for the BRF, the Queen was the very core of their family in ways more complex than for the average family, as well. 

And I think losing a parent is hard regardless of their age. It's a loss of part of who you are. 

One of my uncles went suddenly in 2014. He told my aunt he was going to bed and she found him about 20 minutes later. They rushed him to the hospital but there was nothing they could do.  They think it was something like cerebral hemorrhage or stroke.  The doctors thought it happened fast and he didn’t suffer. I had a feeling that next morning something had happened but couldn’t put my finger on what.  My mom called me at work and I was positive she was going to tell me her sister who had cancer had passed. The uncle going was totally out of left field.  I think if I had a choice I’d want to go like he did.  I don’t want to linger.

My maternal grandma was and still is the core of the family.  We normally do the family reunion on the Sunday closest to September 18.  It fell apart this year due to my health issues and miscommunications but it’s happening going forward come hell or high water.  (And I have multiple fornicate yous lined up for any doctors who feel otherwise).  And there’s always the casino in Dubuque she likes and doing the slots in her honor. (Don’t knock it. One year I won $80 which I think was due to some spiritual assistance). 

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6 hours ago, KnittingOwl said:

The two corgis and Emma the pony waiting at Windsor for the Queen were really touching. Emma even had one of the Queen’s headscarves on her back. 
 

 

I loved seeing her animals. I’m not a big fan of horses but I loved that Emma had one of her headscarves. 

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19 hours ago, EmCatlyn said:

On behalf of those of us whose mothers suffered dementia before they died, I want to say that sometimes the death of the body feels like a release for them and for you, because the “never enough time” refers to when their minds were there.  

My condolences to all of you who said things about dementia, and have parents with other long term problems that make them not as they were.

My mother had cancer, and, like you, I would not have wanted her to suffer another day, as you would not have wanted yours to be in the state they were in, either. 

But, when she died at 83, good long life, it was not enough for me. I still listen for her voice in my ear.. luckily, sometimes, I hear it.

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2 hours ago, Four is Enough said:

My condolences to all of you who said things about dementia, and have parents with other long term problems that make them not as they were.

My mother had cancer, and, like you, I would not have wanted her to suffer another day, as you would not have wanted yours to be in the state they were in, either. 

But, when she died at 83, good long life, it was not enough for me. I still listen for her voice in my ear.. luckily, sometimes, I hear it.

Yeah, I still “hear” my mom sometimes too.  BTW, I wasn’t trying to suggest that you were wrong about how we wish our loved ones could have lived longer.  We just wish they could have lived longer the way we want to remember them: in good health, loving and wise.

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Archbishop Welby got in a good burn at both Boorish and Fornicate Face yesterday

 

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On 9/19/2022 at 2:09 PM, KnittingOwl said:

The two corgis and Emma the pony waiting at Windsor for the Queen were really touching. Emma even had one of the Queen’s headscarves on her back. 
 

I saw a charming snippet where the pony pawed at the ground in what was almost a curtsy when the casket passed.  It was either coincidence or something the handler did, but very appropriate.  

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17 minutes ago, EmCatlyn said:

I saw a charming snippet where the pony pawed at the ground in what was almost a curtsy when the casket passed.  It was either coincidence or something the handler did, but very appropriate.  

I saw that. I thought it was very cute. 

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The corgis were especially touching. I felt bad for them because they're likely unsure of what's going on, and while they're fine with Andrew, it's not the same. My grandparents babysat my uncle's dog nearly every day. My grandma has been dead for three months and that dog STILL looks for her every day. 😪

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The marker has been updated 

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The Queen’s name has been inscribed alongside her mother’s, father’s and husband’s on the ledger stone in the Windsor chapel where she is buried.

The late monarch was laid to rest together with the Duke of Edinburgh on Monday evening in a private service attended by the King and the royal family, which followed her state funeral at Westminster Abbey and committal service in Windsor.

Buckingham Palace said the inscription on the ledger stone in the George VI Memorial Chapel now has the names of the Queen, her parents and Philip, along with their years of birth and death.

The stone, which is new, has replaced the black stone slab set into the floor which had featured the names George VI and Elizabeth in gold lettering.

 

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Anyone else here thinking of an eventual visit to the UK?  I'm thinking in a few years and I would if possible want to go see St. George's Chapel and pay my respects to her Majesty.   I hope by the time I go the line won't be overly long then.

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It is interesting that Princess Margaret's name isn't on the slab.

And I have been planning a trip back for several years, hopefully it will eventually actually happen.

 

Edited by SoSoNosy
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3 hours ago, 47of74 said:

Anyone else here thinking of an eventual visit to the UK?  I'm thinking in a few years and I would if possible want to go see St. George's Chapel and pay my respects to her Majesty.   I hope by the time I go the line won't be overly long then.

I've wanted to go to St. George's Chapel for years, mostly because I want to see Henry VIII and Jane Seymour's final resting place. However, there's extra reason to go now. I'm hopeful that one of these days I'll be able to go. 

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2 minutes ago, viii said:

I've wanted to go to St. George's Chapel for years, mostly because I want to see Henry VIII and Jane Seymour's final resting place. However, there's extra reason to go now. I'm hopeful that one of these days I'll be able to go. 

When I went to Italy back in my Catholic days I got to see the final resting places of JPII (both places), John XXIII, and a number of other Popes. I’m glad I waited a few years because by then the crowds weren’t there when I went. 

When I went to Spain, Morocco, and Portugal I spent a couple hours at Heathrow.  So I’d like to go back and see more of the country.  Im deciding where on the list it should go of places I wanna see. 

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More than anything she was a granny 

 

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6 hours ago, tabitha2 said:

“Look at my red Boots!”

 

Just about died. How adorable is that?

Love seeing the little royals before any awareness of their status in life--they're as completely innocent as any other kid, no matter how privileged they are. They don't know they're privileged, and they certainly don't know Granny is the Queen, she's just Granny. 

And now, after watching that again, I want to go buy a nice wool tartan skirt, a soft wool jumper, and some really sensible walking shoes, and dig out my one strand of good pearls (inherited from my MIL). Just the outfit for leading a pony along with one's grandchild! 😆

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The new marker at the George VI chapel has been revealed

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Buckingham Palace released a photo Saturday giving the first public glimpse of the new ledger stone installed at the final resting place of Queen Elizabeth II.

The image shows the hand-carved Belgian black marble slab with brass letter inlays set into the floor of King George VI Memorial Chapel, St. George’s Chapel, at Windsor Castle in Windsor, England.

Surrounded by floral wreaths and bouquets, it is inscribed with her name and the years of her birth and death, alongside those of her father, George VI; her mother, Elizabeth; and her husband, Philip, who died last year. It replaces a previous slab that had only her parents.

The release came ahead of the queen’s burial site opening to visitors next week as Windsor Castle reopens to the public.

 

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13 minutes ago, SoSoNosy said:

I wonder why Margaret's name isn't on the slab; she is there, too.

She has a separate stone, but it's not clear why. Possibly to do with the Chapel being the mother church of the Order of the Garter and while George VI and then Elizabeth II were both Sovereign of the Order, and Prince Philip and the Queen Mother were both members, Princess Margaret wasn't a member.

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