Jump to content
IGNORED

Jinjer 58: Going for the DMIN


Coconut Flan

Recommended Posts

It's credit card. That was once common, when companies had to pay what seemed like a sizeable percentage to some of them to credit card companies for each transaction. Bulk transactions cost them less. 

It's less common now, partly because nearly everyone uses a bank or credit card, so there are more transactions, and partly because most gas stations are owned by large conglomerates who aren't losing any substantial profit by it. But not all of them, of course, locally owned ones do exist in every area.

At Circle K, I think, it's sort of the opposite; you get a few cents off per gallon if you use their digital pay system, and cash costs more. 

2 hours ago, IsmeWeatherwax said:

The sign shows a different price for cash and credit. Does that credit card or on credit? and why have 2 prices? When I fill up I pay the same price whether I pay cash or card

I have a sort of top of new page curse, I think.

  • Upvote 3
  • Thank You 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 hours ago, JermajestyDuggar said:

Yep. Where I live has is like 3.29? I remember when my husband floated the idea of Southern California a long time ago when we were dating. I was like, nope! It’s so expensive that we would not be able to afford anything and we would live like we were actually poorer than we were. I’m sure it’s beautiful there. But I would rather just visit, not live there.

I have lived in LA most of my life and was born here. I paid 5 dollars for gas many times over the years. It’s high here. And part of why it’s high is because people want to live her. People like JinJer come from all over, raising prices and then complaining. So annoying to me. 

10 hours ago, IsmeWeatherwax said:

The sign shows a different price for cash and credit. Does that credit card or on credit? and why have 2 prices? When I fill up I pay the same price whether I pay cash or card

It’s super common here. Most gas stations have cheaper cash prices. I didn’t realize it was an LA thing. 

  • Upvote 5
  • Thank You 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

24 minutes ago, artdecades said:

t’s super common here. Most gas stations have cheaper cash prices. I didn’t realize it was an LA thing. 

Perhaps the whole area.  It's that way in San Diego and Orange counties, too.

  • Upvote 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's been like that for years everywhere I've lived- Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Colorado. And pretty much every other state we've driven through.

Edited by Scrappinmac
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, artdecades said:

I have lived in LA most of my life and was born here. I paid 5 dollars for gas many times over the years. It’s high here. And part of why it’s high is because people want to live her. People like JinJer come from all over, raising prices and then complaining. So annoying to me. 

It’s super common here. Most gas stations have cheaper cash prices. I didn’t realize it was an LA thing. 

I’m in PA, right on the top part by Lake Erie. The big truck stops do that here too, where paying with cash is one price, and paying with card is another price. The one chain boasts  pretty good diesel discount if you pay with cash.

Also, I get that everyone is really generically annoyed by high prices right now. But can anyone really say that they complained enough on social media and gas prices came down instantly? I get that we all have the right to be annoyed and complain, but I’ll guess I don’t understand if people are just venting or if they expect actual change. 

Edited by SunnySide
  • Upvote 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, SunnySide said:

I’m in PA, right on the top part by Lake Erie. The big truck stops do that here too, where paying with cash is one price, and paying with card is another price. The one chain boasts  pretty good diesel discount if you pay with cash.

I drove through that area a few years ago, it was beautiful!

  • Love 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It’s probably one of the very few things their ‘influencer’ status doesn’t get them a discount or freebie. They aren’t paying market rate rent (or at least weren’t), they tag every eaterie and shop they go to. They have no problem paying for expensive sports shoes, but the price of gas clearly bothers them.

  • Upvote 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know this is an unkind instinct and the product of decades of various economics but the grumbles of americans about gas prices make me immediately do the maths with our almost two pounds a litre petrol which is almost 9 dollars a gallon. 

  • Upvote 14
  • Rufus Bless 2
  • I Agree 7
  • Thank You 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, Father Son Holy Goat said:

I drove through that area a few years ago, it was beautiful!

Thank you! I think it’s a nice area too. The lower cost of living, especially with what’s going on right now doesn’t hurt. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, medimus said:

I know this is an unkind instinct and the product of decades of various economics but the grumbles of americans about gas prices make me immediately do the maths with our almost two pounds a litre petrol which is almost 9 dollars a gallon. 

So much of our American lifestyle is based on cheap gas: suburban spread and lack of good public transport in most places. (Where I live only the poor and elderly use the bus.) In some cases an expanded public transport went underused because it couldn’t compete for convenience with private cars powered by cheap gas.

  If people have chosen where they live and work partly on the availability of cheap gas, they will be angry when it disappears and will predictably blame the Democrats. 

  • Upvote 10
  • I Agree 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Where I live the suburban sprawl has created a catch 22. To find anything remotely affordable housing wise, many people have to go further out and have a long commute which means either long time on the public transport or having a car and paying the prices. There is more reliable public transport in the urban center, but housing costs there are astronomical. I don't know what the solution is. Every year, there's a lot of fighting about funding a lightrail, but I don't know whether that would solve anything or not. Maybe as the satellite communities grow, people can work where they live and stop community? 

 

  • Upvote 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, neuroticcat said:

Where I live the suburban sprawl has created a catch 22. To find anything remotely affordable housing wise, many people have to go further out and have a long commute which means either long time on the public transport or having a car and paying the prices. There is more reliable public transport in the urban center, but housing costs there are astronomical. I don't know what the solution is. Every year, there's a lot of fighting about funding a lightrail, but I don't know whether that would solve anything or not. Maybe as the satellite communities grow, people can work where they live and stop community? 

 

And this is why so many people are demanding to work from home now that they know it’s possible due to the pandemic. I remember thinking back at the beginning of the pandemic that more people will want to work from home even when the pandemic is over. My husband has worked from home since 2008. So many of his coworkers wanted to work from home too but his company kept telling them no. I think now that many people have experienced it, they know they can do it. And their bosses can’t pretend like it isn’t possible anymore. If you can work from home, you aren’t at the mercy of gas prices. You are not forced to live in a very expensive area close to your job. I think the future will show more people working from home. I know it’s not possible for everyone. But I think there will be more as time goes on. 

  • Upvote 11
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, medimus said:

I know this is an unkind instinct and the product of decades of various economics but the grumbles of americans about gas prices make me immediately do the maths with our almost two pounds a litre petrol which is almost 9 dollars a gallon. 

I find it fascinating, too. Where I am it’s around $5 per gallon cash. It’s not unusual for me to drive 100 miles (~160km) over one shift. If gas were $9 a gallon my driving area would probably be quite smaller!

Edited by Giraffe
Adding kilometers
  • Upvote 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, JermajestyDuggar said:

And this is why so many people are demanding to work from home now that they know it’s possible due to the pandemic. I remember thinking back at the beginning of the pandemic that more people will want to work from home even when the pandemic is over. My husband has worked from home since 2008. So many of his coworkers wanted to work from home too but his company kept telling them no. I think now that many people have experienced it, they know they can do it. And their bosses can’t pretend like it isn’t possible anymore. If you can work from home, you aren’t at the mercy of gas prices. You are not forced to live in a very expensive area close to your job. I think the future will show more people working from home. I know it’s not possible for everyone. But I think there will be more as time goes on. 

Aside from all the cars that aren’t burning fossil fuels and polluting our environment, there’s also the major savings in workers’ time and quality of life. I retired in 2015. I worked from 1980-2015 contiguously (aside from 2 MLOAs) and never lived closer than a 45 min drive. That was  an additional 90 mins to my work day, on a good day.  Whatever needs to be done to eliminate that should be done!

  • Upvote 9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, SassyPants said:

Aside from all the cars that aren’t burning fossil fuels and polluting our environment, there’s also the major savings in workers’ time and quality of life. I retired in 2015. I worked from 1980-2015 contiguously (aside from 2 MLOAs) and never lived closer than a 45 min drive. That was  an additional 90 mins to my work day, on a good day.  Whatever needs to be done to eliminate that should be done!

I’ve been working from home since way before the pandemic. 
My commute was an hour and a half there and back. The three hours a day on the train and bus was exhausting and exasperating my health issues. By 2015 it got so bad I knew I could either resign or go full time telework. Thank goodness I had a good boss who approved my request by saying he wondered what took me so long to apply. 

  • Upvote 11
Link to comment
Share on other sites

America isn't set up to do anything in most places without a car. Most roads have no sidewalks or edges where you can walk. At the entrance to my neighborhood both left and right the asphalt ends in a ditch. You cannot walk there. There's a blind curve. There's a piece of sidewalk on the far side of the road but you can't tell if cars are coming because of the curve.

So you have to drive to the store,  library, Dr, work etc etc. Even to the park to go walking. High gas prices can really hurt when every little thing requires driving. So I understand why people gripe about it. 

But it's also why I drive a civic and quit a job with 30 min commute vs my new job with 15 min drive.

My job went virtual.for a few months at beginning of pandemic. Being an introvert I loved it at first...but to my surprise I came to hate it. There was no beginning and end to the day and I think I need the push of dealing with people at work to avoid becoming a fully fledged mountain hermit living in a cave.

 

  • Upvote 17
Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's a lot I liked about working at home, but my office space was cramped, too many trips to the refrigerator, etc... My husband works from home, so instead of calling me a few times a day to chat where I can put him on speaker and go on with my work, he'd be in my doorway or in a chair , so I couldn't half ass listen to him. 

I went back to the office as soon as they told us we could, and I most of the best of both worlds. I have the commute, which does suck, but other stuff is great. Most people didn't come back or are only here sporadically. I have a 4 person office, with a door to myself. I close the door, put on music/audio book/Netflix and get my work done. My hermit heart is happy, but I do still see some people which keeps me in practice socially.  😄 I just have to remember to NOT sing along with my Pandora when the door is open. That would drive out the remaining coworkers... 😆

I love my car and will be sad to see it go, but I think I'll definitely have to get something less gas hungry when my lease is up. Responsibility sucks sometimes. 

  • Upvote 10
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jinger’s latest video is ‘Jinger’s Kitchen’ and today she’s making tater tot casserole. I don’t think this is meant to be comedy.

  • Upvote 2
  • Haha 26
Link to comment
Share on other sites

36 minutes ago, Idlewild said:

Jinger’s latest video is ‘Jinger’s Kitchen’ and today she’s making tater tot casserole. I don’t think this is meant to be comedy.

Her latest $chtick!

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

57 minutes ago, Idlewild said:

Jinger’s latest video is ‘Jinger’s Kitchen’ and today she’s making tater tot casserole. I don’t think this is meant to be comedy.

Too bad neither Jinger nor Jeremy are funny. 

  • Upvote 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

And most people are commenting about how she looks to pull a piece of hair out of it at one point. 

  • Upvote 2
  • Disgust 2
  • WTF 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This has turned out to be one of their more popular videos. 31k views in 12 hours. Not much in the scheme of YouTube overall, but good numbers for Jinjer.

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Coconut Flan locked this topic
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.