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Gwen Shamblin Lara 17: The Hair Apparant


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5 hours ago, formergothardite said:

As someone born and raised in the South I do not own pearls and don’t see them worn often where I live.The south is a diverse place full of an assortment of cultural norms and I would imagine it would be hard to give Southern Lessons that fit all the southern states. Even in the same towns, cultural norms can vary from group to group. 

I live in Los Angeles and wear a black dress and pearls to almost any formal/dressy event just because I like them and it's an easy combo 😁

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You can all thank Breakfast at Tiffany’s for that combo of little black dress and pearls.

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4 hours ago, JermajestyDuggar said:

And southerners say coke. And we find it kind of strange. 

Probably even stranger to a mid-westerner is this exchange. That happens All. The. Time.

Hey I'm gonna get me a drink.

Bring me a Coke will ya please?

What kind?

Dr, Pepper  (RC/ Cheerwine/ Sundrop./ Big Orange/ Nehi Grape, etc. And RC is pronounced AhR-uh-Cee)

Signed Red Hair Black Dress -- born, raised, and always lived in the South.

Edited to add - Cherry Lemon Sundrop is the bomb

Edited by Red Hair, Black Dress
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3 hours ago, formergothardite said:

I have a craving for cherry lemon sundrop right now. 

I’m disappointed the local bakery near me that made cherry lemon sundrop cupcakes closed down. 

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1 hour ago, Red Hair, Black Dress said:

Probably even stranger to a mid-westerner is this exchange. That happens All. The. Time.

Hey I'm gonna get me a drink.

Bring me a Coke will ya please?

What kind?

Dr, Pepper  (RC/ Cheerwine/ Sundrop./ Big Orange/ Nehi Grape, etc. And RC is pronounced AhR-uh-Cee)

Signed Red Hair Black Dress -- born, raised, and always lived in the South.

Edited to add - Cherry Lemon Sundrop is the bomb

You're making me homesick for VA now....

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7 hours ago, JermajestyDuggar said:

I am Midwestern through and through. I’ve seen people say things about southerners that would describe midwesterners pretty well. I think there’s some overlap. But like southerners, midwesterners vary greatly. The only thing I can say with certainty is that many of us say pop. And southerners say coke. And we find it kind of strange. 

Midwesterner here says soda! :D 

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7 hours ago, Alisamer said:

... "Thirsty? I got Coke, Cheerwine and SunDrop. I'm all out of sweet tea." 

"Soda" gets used here sometimes. I've even heard "sodee" or "fizzy drink" from some old people. 

A new Southern friend endeared himself to me when I asked what he’d like to drink and he replied, “Any Co-Cola product!”  
 

Crow that I am, I’ve stolen that phrase to amuse myself, befuddle my friends and annoy my Junior JBs: (to the server) “You have Co-Cola products? Just Pepsi? I’ll take a coffee.”

:GPn0zNK:

4 hours ago, JermajestyDuggar said:

You can all thank Breakfast at Tiffany’s for that combo of little black dress and pearls.

And I do. I truly, ooly DO. ❤️ 

6 hours ago, JanasTattooParlor said:

Totally agree with this. I’m near Charleston, SC and I would say most people here don’t have an accent or have a slight one. The one thing that always tells people I’m from this area is that I drop the “r” in Charleston and say “Chalston” instead, but other than that I don’t really have an accent. 

First time I was in the lowcountry somebody talked about going to “Alla Pom.”  When I finally figured it out, I loved it!
 

Been back several times but everybody who’s said it, since, has said “Isle of Palms.” I've been so. disappointed. I’d thought I had a secret password, but, no. Alas. 

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11 hours ago, Cornelia13 said:

If you hear "Bless her heart" ... it's not a good thing ... 😆😆

I am really wary of the Bless Your Heart reaction on FJ because I honestly can't work out how it's going to be perceived. The times someone's used it on something I've posted I've worked myself into knots trying to work out what they meant, and whether I should be offended/upset or not!  Spare a thought for those of us navigating unfamiliar cultural waters in a leaky boat here, heh.

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7 hours ago, MamaJunebug said:

First time I was in the lowcountry somebody talked about going to “Alla Pom.”  When I finally figured it out, I loved it!
 

Been back several times but everybody who’s said it, since, has said “Isle of Palms.” I've been so. disappointed. I’d thought I had a secret password, but, no. Alas. 

Well, be disappointed no more! My husband and I both say Isle of Palms as “Alla Pom” and it actually takes some concentration to say it the correct way. I didn’t actually realize I said it this way until I was reading your post and knew exactly what Alla Pom was before reading the next part. Now I’m trying to figure out what other cities around here I say differently, and I’m sounding out words to my husband while he just shakes his head at me 😂

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1 hour ago, JanasTattooParlor said:

Well, be disappointed no more! My husband and I both say Isle of Palms as “Alla Pom” and it actually takes some concentration to say it the correct way. I didn’t actually realize I said it this way until I was reading your post and knew exactly what Alla Pom was before reading the next part. Now I’m trying to figure out what other cities around here I say differently, and I’m sounding out words to my husband while he just shakes his head at me 😂

ftom disappointment to delight!  Especially that my spelling rang true to you!! :happy-bouncycyan:

My anonymity is as important to me as I’m sure yours is to you, but next time I head East, I will PM you about a possible meet-up!!! I remember a great Cajun place on Alla Pom!  🤗 And I’ll be fine if we just continue as  on-screen friends! ❤️ 

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1 hour ago, JanasTattooParlor said:

Now I’m trying to figure out what other cities around here I say differently, and I’m sounding out words to my husband while he just shakes his head at me 😂

I'm not sure why I even remember this because I've never been to Baltimore, MD and have no connection there, but back in, it must've been the 80s, there was this quirky TV show I loved, called "The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd" and I remember one episode where a character goes on a bit about how he's from there and the locals pronounce it "Ballmer". 🤷‍♀️😄

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I was born and raised in Minnesota but somehow ended up with “soda” as my preferred soft drink label. Strong Minnesota accents are especially terrible with the word “pop.” Very JillRod paaahp. I’m now in NC and haven’t yet learned what people say here. 

Edited by fundiewatch
Lots of typos.
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5 hours ago, Ozlsn said:

I am really wary of the Bless Your Heart reaction on FJ because I honestly can't work out how it's going to be perceived. The times someone's used it on something I've posted I've worked myself into knots trying to work out what they meant, and whether I should be offended/upset or not!  Spare a thought for those of us navigating unfamiliar cultural waters in a leaky boat here, heh.

Yeah "bless your heart" is one of those phrases that could mean anything.

Like how "dude" depending on context and intonation, could mean one of any dozens of things! "Bless your heart!" exclaimed compassionately can mean "I hear your tale of woe, and can't believe all that's happening to you right now. So sorry!" in that case, and some others, it's a genuine "I feel for you" type phrase and not negative.

"Bless her heart..." with downward intonation and side-eye plus a thin-lipped head shake, as in the mother of the bride toward the white-wearing wedding guest I mentioned before, meant something along the lines of "I don't know why I expected better from her, we all know she's always been... tacky."

"Well bless your heart." said patronizingly with a lean in and possibly a pat on the arm or shoulder can mean "You just said something bonkers/offensive/incredibly stupid and I just want to close out this conversation before I tell you to go fuck yourself."

Sometimes in text it's meant to be vague in a dismissive way. Kind of like "I heard what you said, now shut up, because it was stupid." Very similar to the "move along" reaction, in that way!

So yeah I don't know what it means in the reactions, either. So much depends on context and body language, with that phrase, that it's difficult to use in text unless the context is totally clear.

 

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This is only tangential to the discussion of "Alla Pom" but I think you'll get a giggle out of my misunderstanding of a place name. A very long time ago I was copying down an address from a radio show so I could write to the guest. I thought they were saying "Court Elaine." I still have to look up "Coeur d'Alene." to know how to spell it. 

Hey, I'm from New Mexico. I do better spelling Spanish words!!

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Ooo I am liking this drift!!

A middle of the Midwestern friend had a daughter who she called “Ammarie,”

AM-murrey. 

The child’s government name: Ann-Marie. 
 

Have I ever mentioned how to pronounce the name of Joe & Jesse’s town?

It’s oh-LAYTH-uh

Not LAYTH as in “lathe” - the th is as in “eighth.”  Guess I could write it

oh-LEIGHTH-uh

The ei = Long a sound 

1 hour ago, Alisamer said:

Yeah "bless your heart" is one of those phrases that could mean anything.

Like how "dude" depending on context and intonation, could mean one of any dozens of things! "Bless your heart!" exclaimed compassionately can mean "I hear your tale of woe, and can't believe all that's happening to you right now. So sorry!" in that case, and some others, it's a genuine "I feel for you" type phrase and not negative.

"Bless her heart..." with downward intonation and side-eye plus a thin-lipped head shake, as in the mother of the bride toward the white-wearing wedding guest I mentioned before, meant something along the lines of "I don't know why I expected better from her, we all know she's always been... tacky."

"Well bless your heart." said patronizingly with a lean in and possibly a pat on the arm or shoulder can mean "You just said something bonkers/offensive/incredibly stupid and I just want to close out this conversation before I tell you to go fuck yourself."

Sometimes in text it's meant to be vague in a dismissive way. Kind of like "I heard what you said, now shut up, because it was stupid." Very similar to the "move along" reaction, in that way!

So yeah I don't know what it means in the reactions, either. So much depends on context and body language, with that phrase, that it's difficult to use in text unless the context is totally clear.

 

Just FTR, I’ve never used the eyeroll reaction to comment on the FJ poster’s post, but on the fundie’s behavior being described in the post. 
 

I'm glad there’s a rule against is asking what was meant by other’s reaction emojis. There is such a rule, right? 

Edited by MamaJunebug
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25 minutes ago, MamaJunebug said:

I'm glad there’s a rule against is asking what was meant by other’s reaction emojis. There is such a rule, right? 

Yep don't question the reactions in the threads.  People are allowed to pick what they want without explanation or justification.

Just because I feel like it:  :goldfish:

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1 hour ago, ManyGoats said:

. A very long time ago I was copying down an address from a radio show so I could write to the guest. I thought they were saying "Court Elaine." I still have to look up "Coeur d'Alene." to know how to spell it. 

We have a Pedernales River in Texas. To understand how it's pronounced,  when headed that way as kids, my mom and her siblings thought they were going to see Bert 'n Alice. 

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Here in the Midwest, I’ve seen “bless his/her heart” in a different way. Like when a little kid tries really hard to do something  and fails miserably. Say he tried to pick flowers for his mom but picked a bunch of flowers from the neighbor’s garden and presented them proudly. Basically it means their heart was in the right place even though it was a mistake.

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Obviously I’m not from the US. But I’d use “Coke”/“Coca Cola” for the actual drink, and just “fizzy drink”/the name of the product for something else. Different parts of the U.K. use fizzy pop/soda/likely other phrases I’m not sure of, but I’m not sure which area uses what words. 

Somewhat different to place names, but I remember watching Frozen with my friends in our first year at university (I know we weren’t really the target audience, I don’t remember who chose it) and being utterly confused as to one of the character’s names. It sounded like Unna or Honour to me. I thought it was some Scandinavian name. Then I realised it was Anna! To me, Anna is pronounced “ah-nuh”, short ‘a’ like in “cat”. 

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16 minutes ago, mango_fandango said:

Somewhat different to place names, but I remember watching Frozen with my friends in our first year at university (I know we weren’t really the target audience, I don’t remember who chose it) and being utterly confused as to one of the character’s names. It sounded like Unna or Honour to me. I thought it was some Scandinavian name. Then I realised it was Anna! To me, Anna is pronounced “ah-nuh”, short ‘a’ like in “cat”. 

I love discussions of regional variations and such. 

Here (the US south) Anna is basically Ann-ah. Andrea is usually and-ree-uh. But I know an Andrea, who for some reason our pastor calls "ahn-dre-a". Like in Frank Zappa's song "Valley Girl" "yah my name is AAAAAHNdreah. I am a Val, I know."

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13 hours ago, MamaJunebug said:

Midwesterner here says soda! :D 

Same. I grew up saying pop. Then I worked at a Radisson for 4 years during college. Travelers from all over staying there because of the HQs in my area. One of the regular CEO VIPs, suggested I change to soda because it doesn't have multiple meanings based on context (pop=soda; pop=fart; pop=hit; etc.). I took his advice and changed. 

My family in the Richmond, VA area were the ones that said "Coke" for all soda when I met them 30+ years ago. I still remember them asking if I wanted a coke, I said yes (it was a treat my parents rarely bought soda and usually it was flavored faygo) and then I was confused when they said what kind. Plus they had thicker accents back then and trying to understand "coke" and a new drawl for middle school me with a hearing disability, it is quite comical looking back! 

Bless your heart! when I say it, it is almost always "oh good grief you are dumb". And when I mean it that way, I say it with a stupid fake accent so everyone knows I am being sarcastic. A co-worker that grew up in MS and the Midwest, taught me how to say it correctly. She went to charm school after all. :DI love that saying! 

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3 hours ago, ManyGoats said:

This is only tangential to the discussion of "Alla Pom" but I think you'll get a giggle out of my misunderstanding of a place name. A very long time ago I was copying down an address from a radio show so I could write to the guest. I thought they were saying "Court Elaine." I still have to look up "Coeur d'Alene." to know how to spell it. 

Hey, I'm from New Mexico. I do better spelling Spanish words!!

Along the same lines (and not far away, geographically) is Lake Pend Oreille, near Sandpoint, Idaho.  

But right next to Sandpoint is another town called (and spelled)  Ponderay.

I wonder how locals distinguish between them.

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56 minutes ago, church_of_dog said:

Along the same lines (and not far away, geographically) is Lake Pend Oreille, near Sandpoint, Idaho.  

But right next to Sandpoint is another town called (and spelled)  Ponderay.

I wonder how locals distinguish between them.

The first should be pronounced Pend Oh-Real. 😅 Ha ha! If you saw my previous post, you knew better than to take me seriously. 

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