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Gwen Shamblin Lara 17: The Hair Apparant


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48 minutes ago, Cults-r-us said:

I think one enemy of keeping FLDS members locked in is social media. Whereas before, shunned and expelled members disappeared into an unknowing abyss, causing fear and anxiety about being kicked out and keeping members in line. Now members look on line and see people who have been kicked out or left are fine (which is not entirely true as I think there is a high rate of substance abuse and suicide in their youth) and their communication is not cut off like before.

I guess same with Gwen's folk. As more leave and their relatives do not see them perishing in hopeless fatness, it will feel safer to venture out from the cult's constraints.

We have to remember the FLDS is a century or so old. Several generations born into it. Warren is at least 3rd generation.

Gwen's cult is young, yes kids are getting born into it but not generations, yet. I hope this fizzles before it becomes a FLDS or Co$. 

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Possibly/Probably a dumb question but those of you who watch the webcasts, did it make you nervous to open an account? I can't think of any reason why it would be risky but I have hesitated to do so. 

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1 hour ago, ManyGoats said:

Possibly/Probably a dumb question but those of you who watch the webcasts, did it make you nervous to open an account? I can't think of any reason why it would be risky but I have hesitated to do so. 

I did it ages ago and only skim through to see the craziness use my junk mail email and never reply to them.  I definitely don’t watch often really just lurk a little 

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Today in, They Just Don't Think, Do They?, Gwen says you can be done with sin and points out that people were skeptic that pilots and aviators couldn't overcome gravity.

Spoiler

 

You CAN Be Done With Sin

June 21, 2021

by Gwen Shamblin Lara

3 Comments

Therefore, since Christ suffered in his body, arm yourselves also with the same attitude, because he who has suffered in his body is done with sin. As a result, he does not live the rest of his earthly life for evil human desires, but rather for the will of God.
1 Peter 4:1-2

Peter, who had failed Christ at one time, held the keys to the Kingdom when he wrote the words of these verses. Just as there were early skeptics who thought pioneer aviators could not overcome the earth’s gravity, skeptics today do not believe that you can be done with sin, even though this scripture tells you that you can. The skeptics say that you are wasting your time, you are arrogant, and you are dreaming. When you fall down, they gloat and mock, saying, “Well, what is the matter? I thought you could overcome sin.” Skeptics exist inside AND outside the church building, and some even live with you. They will say, “Once an alcoholic, always an alcoholic,” or “Once you become obese, you will just have to ‘watch it’ for the rest of your life.”

But re-read Peter’s statement above. Is this not one of the most exciting things you have ever read? I have broken free of the refrigerator’s magnetism, and it no longer exerts a gravitational pull on me. I am flying, and you can, too. Let’s imitate the pioneer pilots who reached their goals by setting their minds on what was NOT seen (their dreams of flying) rather than on what WAS seen (their skeptics and the early, inevitable failures). Sin is a rebellious attitude that does not want to submit. But the exciting truth is that you have everything you need to turn it around and be DONE WITH SIN! You can do it!

Editorial note: Gwen died because her pilot spouse couldn't overcome gravity.

 

Anyway this argument is another fallacy. It''s like saying, "people said I couldn't eat ten hotdogs at once, but they were wrong, so this proves they're also wrong when they say I can't  pay this huge loan". 

Edited by AmazonGrace
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Plus former members are writing about their experiences. Brent Jeffs and Rachel Jeffs, Warren Jeffs nephew and daughter respectively have written books about leaving the FLDS. They are two of a handful. A book can change your world view and dare I say your life. 

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23 hours ago, ManyGoats said:

Possibly/Probably a dumb question but those of you who watch the webcasts, did it make you nervous to open an account? I can't think of any reason why it would be risky but I have hesitated to do so. 

I don’t watch them because I don’t want to register. 

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Today in the Annals of Thought Control: If you think anything is unfair or believe that your Remnant buddies are taking advantage of you, you're never gonna get to Heaven. Screenshot_20210622-120256.thumb.jpg.899f547e211e2b6dcc46c2f5d2d34c46.jpg

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On 6/20/2021 at 4:39 PM, Howl said:

When I worked with grad students before I retired, a student who had been raised and gone to college in the south gave "Southern Lessons" to a fellow doctoral student from the northeast who'd just gotten a job at a traditional liberal arts college in the Deep South.  It helped! 

As someone who lives in the Los Angeles area and has never been to the deep south, I'd be fascinated to learn more about those "Southern Lessons." I have a lot of stereotypes in my mind and I wonder if they are actually true. The black dress and pearls thing mentioned by @rabbitholejulie for example. Out here, pearls are rarely seen at all, and a black dress with pearls would be way overkill except in very formal situations.

Any other "lessons?"

 

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8 minutes ago, livinginthelight said:

As someone who lives in the Los Angeles area and has never been to the deep south, I'd be fascinated to learn more about those "Southern Lessons." I have a lot of stereotypes in my mind and I wonder if they are actually true. The black dress and pearls thing mentioned by @rabbitholejulie for example. Out here, pearls are rarely seen at all, and a black dress with pearls would be way overkill except in very formal situations.

Any other "lessons?"

 

As someone born and raised in the South I do not own pearls and don’t see them worn often where I live.The south is a diverse place full of an assortment of cultural norms and I would imagine it would be hard to give Southern Lessons that fit all the southern states. Even in the same towns, cultural norms can vary from group to group. 

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5 minutes ago, formergothardite said:

As someone born and raised in the South I do not own pearls and don’t see them worn often where I live.The south is a diverse place full of an assortment of cultural norms and I would imagine it would be hard to give Southern Lessons that fit all the southern states. Even in the same towns, cultural norms can vary from group to group. 

Awwww, I so love dealing in stereotypes! 😁

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I just read a Wall Street Journal article on losing pandemic weight that suggested waiting for “the growl.” Dangerously close to Gwen territory. 

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7 minutes ago, livinginthelight said:

Out here, pearls are rarely seen at all, and a black dress with pearls would be way overkill except in very formal situations.

Any other "lessons?"

 

Born and raised in the south, to family who has been in the south since at least 1652. No money left, though apparently the great-great-great grandparents were quite well off. I also graduated from a Southern women's college.

One of my graduation gifts was a nice real pearl necklace with matching stud earrings.

Things are much more casual now, but it took me years to be willing to wear pants to church, and I still try not to wear white shoes between Labor Day and Easter (athletic shoes are an exception). I read this book (A Southern Belle Primer) back in the 90s and it is hilarious but also has some accuracy to it. It's apparently been updated, too! I'm not an "old money" southern lady, but I went to college with many who were, and tend toward that sort of etiquette myself in many situations. 

But yes, the South is just as varied as any other part of the country, and it all depends on the group of people you're with. I'd say on the whole, in the South it's generally best to err on the side of good manners and friendliness, and in some situations it's better to err toward "a little too formal" rather than "a little too casual". Though a proper southern lady would never say anything about how anyone dresses... to their face. 

Some of the stereotypes are true sometimes, but none of them are true all the time or for every person or every group. 

Still, a nice black dress with pearls? Perfect for church, weddings (maybe add a bright scarf or cardigan), funerals, dinner parties, college Alumnae meetings, dances, the Kentucky Derby... 

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24 minutes ago, formergothardite said:

As someone born and raised in the South I do not own pearls and don’t see them worn often where I live.The south is a diverse place full of an assortment of cultural norms and I would imagine it would be hard to give Southern Lessons that fit all the southern states. Even in the same towns, cultural norms can vary from group to group. 

Also in the South and I see pearls more commonly worn among upper class or older southerners, usually people from old money. My grandmother had a set of everyday pearls and a set of “nice” pearls that were for weddings or other events. I’ve only ever worn a pearl necklace for sorority pictures in college, but I have a pair of pearl studs that I love to wear when I dress up. I do however, have several black dresses that I wear to almost any event. My best advice for anyone moving here is to always be polite and friendly because the Southern hospitality is real and people will remember how you were when they first met you. 

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I am Midwestern through and through. I’ve seen people say things about southerners that would describe midwesterners pretty well. I think there’s some overlap. But like southerners, midwesterners vary greatly. The only thing I can say with certainty is that many of us say pop. And southerners say coke. And we find it kind of strange. 

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3 hours ago, Alisamer said:

Born and raised in the south, to family who has been in the south since at least 1652. No money left, though apparently the great-great-great grandparents were quite well off. I also graduated from a Southern women's college.

One of my graduation gifts was a nice real pearl necklace with matching stud earrings.

Things are much more casual now, but it took me years to be willing to wear pants to church, and I still try not to wear white shoes between Labor Day and Easter (athletic shoes are an exception). I read this book (A Southern Belle Primer) back in the 90s and it is hilarious but also has some accuracy to it. It's apparently been updated, too! I'm not an "old money" southern lady, but I went to college with many who were, and tend toward that sort of etiquette myself in many situations. 

But yes, the South is just as varied as any other part of the country, and it all depends on the group of people you're with. I'd say on the whole, in the South it's generally best to err on the side of good manners and friendliness, and in some situations it's better to err toward "a little too formal" rather than "a little too casual". Though a proper southern lady would never say anything about how anyone dresses... to their face. 

Some of the stereotypes are true sometimes, but none of them are true all the time or for every person or every group. 

Still, a nice black dress with pearls? Perfect for church, weddings (maybe add a bright scarf or cardigan), funerals, dinner parties, college Alumnae meetings, dances, the Kentucky Derby... 

New Englander born and bred here.  One color I really would rather not wear to a wedding would be black.  I remember when black became a popular bridesmaid color and how strange I thought it was.  Guess I’m showing my age.

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19 minutes ago, JermajestyDuggar said:

I am Midwestern through and through. I’ve seen people say things about southerners that would describe midwesterners pretty well. I think there’s some overlap. But like southerners, midwesterners vary greatly. The only thing I can say with certainty is that many of us say pop. And southerners say coke. And we find it kind of strange. 

LOL I had a friend in junior high who had just moved from the midwest and she said pop, which was so cute at first.

If I ask for Coke, I mean Coke. Sometimes I'll get Pepsi, but usually they clarify in that case. (Tip: if you prefer coke to pepsi, adding a small squeeze of lemon or a shot of Mountain Dew to the Pepsi will make it better!) I don't think I've heard anyone ever say "coke" as a general word for a soft drink, though I keep being told that's a Southern thing to do! Most people would say "what do you want to drink" or "want a drink?" or even "want some soda?" or just say whatever they have. "Thirsty? I got Coke, Cheerwine and SunDrop. I'm all out of sweet tea." 

"Soda" gets used here sometimes. I've even heard "sodee" or "fizzy drink" from some old people. 

I have to say though, I'm close to Charlotte, NC - and I think the closer to a big city people are the less "hillbilly southern" their vocabulary and accent seems to be. Education makes a difference, the media they watch, etc. And of course people tend to code-switch depending on situation, more proper for work, more casual and possibly heavier accent at home, etc. 

A couple weeks ago I had an RC cola in a glass bottle. No moon pie, sadly. 

6 minutes ago, Granwych said:

New Englander born and bred here.  One color I really would rather not wear to a wedding would be black.  I remember when black became a popular bridesmaid color and how strange I thought it was.  Guess I’m showing my age.

My sister's bridesmaid dresses were black. Her dress was pale pink!

I'd wear black anywhere (latent goth tendencies still strong with me) but for a wedding I'd probably add some color of some sort so it wasn't all black, unless I knew it was cool with the bride. 

I would not, however, ever be caught dead wearing primarily white at a wedding. One of my cousins wore all white at another cousins wedding and there were some LOOKS.

And the bride's mother broke out a genuine "bless her heart..." with a head shake. That particular cousin was always a bit of a rebel and not that up on etiquette. 

Edited by Alisamer
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When a movie or TV show is set in the Midwest and a character says pop, I’m pleased. “The Middle” always said pop and I was glad. They did their homework. They know people in Indiana say pop. I hate it when a show takes place in a certain area of the country and no one has an accent or even uses local verbiage. 

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3 hours ago, livinginthelight said:

Awwww, I so love dealing in stereotypes! 😁

People most likely will ask where you attend church! So there is that. 😂 And total strangers will want to have long conversations with you. Once a conversation with a stranger at a gas pump ended with the other person inviting me to a pool party. People can be overly friendly. 

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24 minutes ago, Alisamer said:

"Thirsty? I got Coke, Cheerwine and SunDrop. I'm all out of sweet tea." 

 

And the bride's mother broke out a genuine "bless her heart..." with a head shake. That particular cousin was always a bit of a rebel and not that up on etiquette. 

Cheerwine .... oh, I miss Cheerwine! I haven't had that since I moved from VA! So, so good! And I'm not a soda drinker ...

 

If you hear "Bless her heart" ... it's not a good thing ... 😆😆

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In the South when someone asks  "what kind of Coke do you have?" The response is  "Coke, Sprite, Dr. Pepper, Diet Coke, Pepsi, etc.." If you are going to a party and someone asks you to bring the Cokes, they mean for you to bring a selection of carbonated drinks. 

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37 minutes ago, Alisamer said:

 I don't think I've heard anyone ever say "coke" as a general word for a soft drink, though I keep being told that's a Southern thing to do!

I grew up in New Mexico and we called all soft drinks "coke." The Mormons said "pop" but that was because they wanted to make sure we knew they didn't drink Coke.

 

Edited by ManyGoats
poor proofreading
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2 minutes ago, TN-peach said:

In the South when someone asks  "what kind of Coke do you have?" The response is  "Coke, Sprite, Dr. Pepper, Diet Coke, Pepsi, etc.." If you are going to a party and someone asks you to bring the Cokes, they mean for you to bring a selection of carbonated drinks. 

YES!!!!!! Here in Colorado it's "pop"....grates on my nerves!!!! 

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1 hour ago, Alisamer said:

I have to say though, I'm close to Charlotte, NC - and I think the closer to a big city people are the less "hillbilly southern" their vocabulary and accent seems to be. Education makes a difference, the media they watch, etc. And of course people tend to code-switch depending on situation, more proper for work, more casual and possibly heavier accent at home, etc. 

Totally agree with this. I’m near Charleston, SC and I would say most people here don’t have an accent or have a slight one. The one thing that always tells people I’m from this area is that I drop the “r” in Charleston and say “Chalston” instead, but other than that I don’t really have an accent. 
 

1 hour ago, Alisamer said:

I don't think I've heard anyone ever say "coke" as a general word for a soft drink, though I keep being told that's a Southern thing to do!

1 hour ago, formergothardite said:

People most likely will ask where you attend church! So there is that. 😂 

These are both Southern stereotypes that I’ve never had happen to me and I’m born and raised here! I say Coke to either mean Coke or Pepsi since I’m fine with either, and I’ve never once had someone ask me where I go to church. I think both of these are more rural South things and don’t happen as much closer to the cities. 
 

Also, now that it’s been mentioned, I’d kill for some Cheerwine or RC right about now!

Edited by JanasTattooParlor
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I have a craving for cherry lemon sundrop right now. 

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