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Dillards 89: I'd Watch a Netflix Xpecial and so Would My Mom


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Derick has earned himself some goodwill over these last couple of years by basically keeping his mouth shut regarding LGBTQ issues, abortion, immigration, etc. It’s hard to say if his positions are really changing or he’s just keeping them to himself. I’m very curious if he’s going to use his law career to push conservative agendas or just to support his family.

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Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, purple_summer said:

Basically the idea that dads/older brothers have to be on standby with a shotgun at all times to protect their delicate womenz from the evil menz. 

I have to admit though, it’s pretty much my favourite part in the twilight series when Charlie was cleaning out his shotgun when Bella brought Ed over. Charlie, Anna and the guy from the decendents were the best part of that movie. 
edit to add maybe this term is less offensive for me because. Shotguns are not as common in Australia as america. I think if someone walked in on a father was cleaning any type of gun at the table an Aussie would assume he was a bikie or something and gtfo (excluding rural country areas). Guns are in Australia but are very much not the norm for the majority of Aussies. And for that I thank god. I’m not anti gun but am very grateful for our strict laws. To summarise shotgun weddings etc don’t bother me because I’m not overly exposed to them. 

Edited by AussieKrissy
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10 hours ago, BemusedByFundamentalism said:

May I ask what the shotgun "joke" is? I'm not from the USA. 

Someone else has explained it. (Beautiful girl with many suitors = father must protect her with a shotgun.)  I just want to add that I have heard essentially the same joke in Spanish among Spanish Americans.

(In contrast, the term “shotgun wedding” does not translate directly to Spanish.)

7 hours ago, QuiverFullofBooks said:

My law school graduation didn’t involve hooding. I think most universities reserve hoods for PhDs.

Masters and even Bachelors may have hoods. They don’t usually have hoodings though.

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2 minutes ago, closetcagebaby said:

To be fair, threatening a 100 year old creepo virgin who wants to eat your daughter is probably an okay use of a shotgun. 😂

I snorted my coffee ba ha ha 

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On 5/7/2021 at 2:17 PM, Don'tlikekoolaid said:

I used to be confused about trans women competing in women’s sports.  Mainly because my trans friend and I rode bikes for fun and would get all competitive and she beat me every time. I now realize it was because she had only just started hormone therapy.  I discovered when hormone therapy is completed there is no unfair advantage.  I educated myself and changed my opinion.  I’m happy I’m able to change.  Fuck TERF.  And fuck that traitor Caitlyn Jenner.

And for example, over the last 8 years there have been 11 trans students competing in sports in Florida. The sponsors of the anti-trans bill in Georgia could not produce a single example. There are more cis girls playing boys football- nearly 3000.

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Jill looks amazing in the picture with Derick. Does anyone know about Dereck's medallion he's wearing? Is that something all law graduates from University of Arkansas get or is that a special honor?

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2 hours ago, EmCatlyn said:

Someone else has explained it. (Beautiful girl with many suitors = father must protect her with a shotgun.)  I just want to add that I have heard essentially the same joke in Spanish among Spanish Americans.

(In contrast, the term “shotgun wedding” does not translate directly to Spanish.)

Masters and even Bachelors may have hoods. They don’t usually have hoodings though.

I agreed on the hoods for all levels but not hoodings, though that can be situational. I have a Bachelors, two Masters degrees, and a PhD (yeah, I spent way too much time in school and still work for a university). I wore a hood for all the ceremonies, and was hooded for one Masters and the PhD. The Bachelors hood was standard at the small private women's liberal arts college I went to, and all regalia belonged to the college, so we also wore it for senior pictures taken in the fall for the yearbook (!). At the Masters level, while each ceremony involved a hood, the difference between the two that the one in which I was hooded was at a smaller branch college of a public state school where the highest available degree was a Masters and there were only a handful of us (so we marched in and crossed the stage first, being hooded in the process, before the bachelors students crossed with no hoods at all), while the second ceremony was at a flagship state school where there were over two hundred of us receiving the same Masters degree. In contrast, all PhD graduates at the same flagship can get hooded by their doctoral advisor if they attend their departmental ceremony and/or the university-wide doctoral hooding ceremony, but no one is hooded at the university-wide all degree-level ceremony, PhD students enter already wearing their hoods.

Additionally, as someone said upthread, law students are indeed not usually included in doctoral hooding ceremonies despite wearing hoods for commencement, as the JD isn't a research doctorate with students working on specific research projects under individual advisors (despite being lots of hard work and entirely deserving of the degree!). However, Doctors of Juridical Science (JSD) are often hooded, as this is a research degree, as are recipients of other non-PhD degrees that are research based and culminate in a dissertation or other capstone project, such as Doctors of Education, Doctors of Musical Arts, and Doctors of Audiology. This will all likely differ by institution, but provides some context for who may be hooded when.

Interestingly, there are actually different types of hoods for each degree level! At each progression the hood gets longer, and doctoral hoods have a whole extra swoopy bit down the sides. They all have the ridiculous pointy bit at the end of the hood itself though. Sleeves on the robes also change depending on degree level, with Masters robes having the most ridiculous sleeves, but interestingly much like kimono sleeves they're excellent for sticking things like phones in as long as you remember they're there and don't swing them around and knock anyone out. Whoops!

Example of the differences from https://static.scs.georgetown.edu/upload/kb_file/Graduation_Apparel_How_To_Guide_SCS.pdf

image.png.ed8720462e620e5533a16b85f158b517.png

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10 hours ago, atheistjd said:


Interesting... mine definitely did and I always thought it was for all terminal degrees. Wonder if it’s regional?

I got hooded. I'm in Kentucky.

9 hours ago, front hugs > duggs said:

I can’t believe it’s been three years of Derrick in law school, but also the pandemic has warped my sense of time. Many here predicted he would never complete his law degree. I hope he uses his degree to 1)support his family and 2) not make anything worse for those already disenfranchised. 
 

Do you have a focus or concentration in law school? Do we know what Derricks is?

Lots of people who were doing something corporate or headed that way took all the corporations courses offered. (I learned all I knew about corporations when I studied for the Bar). One of the people in my class aimed toward tax and a Masters of Law in tax so he took all the tax classes he could.

I worked full-time as a paralegal with the Public Defender the whole time I was in law school. I tried to keep it quiet but one of my classmates caught me on the phone (no cell phones then; at least none we could afford) talking to my supervisor because I had an idea about the motion we were writing for our client driving to school. I didn't think about what I was doing; I just knew I had to get that idea in his head because it was so important to the motion. That meant about two weeks in, everybody knew I was a paralegal.

My focus was to graduate, take the Bar and pass it so I could be a PD attorney and actually sign the motions and other pleadings I was drafting or helping to draft.

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45 minutes ago, metheglyn said:

I agreed on the hoods for all levels but not hoodings, though that can be situational. I have a Bachelors, two Masters degrees, and a PhD (yeah, I spent way too much time in school and still work for a university). I wore a hood for all the ceremonies, and was hooded for one Masters and the PhD. The Bachelors hood was standard at the small private women's liberal arts college I went to, and all regalia belonged to the college, so we also wore it for senior pictures taken in the fall for the yearbook (!). At the Masters level, while each ceremony involved a hood, the difference between the two that the one in which I was hooded was at a smaller branch college of a public state school where the highest available degree was a Masters and there were only a handful of us (so we marched in and crossed the stage first, being hooded in the process, before the bachelors students crossed with no hoods at all), while the second ceremony was at a flagship state school where there were over two hundred of us receiving the same Masters degree. In contrast, all PhD graduates at the same flagship can get hooded by their doctoral advisor if they attend their departmental ceremony and/or the university-wide doctoral hooding ceremony, but no one is hooded at the university-wide all degree-level ceremony, PhD students enter already wearing their hoods.

Additionally, as someone said upthread, law students are indeed not usually included in doctoral hooding ceremonies despite wearing hoods for commencement, as the JD isn't a research doctorate with students working on specific research projects under individual advisors (despite being lots of hard work and entirely deserving of the degree!). However, Doctors of Juridical Science (JSD) are often hooded, as this is a research degree, as are recipients of other non-PhD degrees that are research based and culminate in a dissertation or other capstone project, such as Doctors of Education, Doctors of Musical Arts, and Doctors of Audiology. This will all likely differ by institution, but provides some context for who may be hooded when.

Interestingly, there are actually different types of hoods for each degree level! At each progression the hood gets longer, and doctoral hoods have a whole extra swoopy bit down the sides. They all have the ridiculous pointy bit at the end of the hood itself though. Sleeves on the robes also change depending on degree level, with Masters robes having the most ridiculous sleeves, but interestingly much like kimono sleeves they're excellent for sticking things like phones in as long as you remember they're there and don't swing them around and knock anyone out. Whoops!

Example of the differences from https://static.scs.georgetown.edu/upload/kb_file/Graduation_Apparel_How_To_Guide_SCS.pdf

image.png.ed8720462e620e5533a16b85f158b517.png

45 minutes ago, metheglyn said:

I agreed on the hoods for all levels but not hoodings, though that can be situational. I have a Bachelors, two Masters degrees, and a PhD (yeah, I spent way too much time in school and still work for a university). I wore a hood for all the ceremonies, and was hooded for one Masters and the PhD. The Bachelors hood was standard at the small private women's liberal arts college I went to, and all regalia belonged to the college, so we also wore it for senior pictures taken in the fall for the yearbook (!). At the Masters level, while each ceremony involved a hood, the difference between the two that the one in which I was hooded was at a smaller branch college of a public state school where the highest available degree was a Masters and there were only a handful of us (so we marched in and crossed the stage first, being hooded in the process, before the bachelors students crossed with no hoods at all), while the second ceremony was at a flagship state school where there were over two hundred of us receiving the same Masters degree. In contrast, all PhD graduates at the same flagship can get hooded by their doctoral advisor if they attend their departmental ceremony and/or the university-wide doctoral hooding ceremony, but no one is hooded at the university-wide all degree-level ceremony, PhD students enter already wearing their hoods.

Additionally, as someone said upthread, law students are indeed not usually included in doctoral hooding ceremonies despite wearing hoods for commencement, as the JD isn't a research doctorate with students working on specific research projects under individual advisors (despite being lots of hard work and entirely deserving of the degree!). However, Doctors of Juridical Science (JSD) are often hooded, as this is a research degree, as are recipients of other non-PhD degrees that are research based and culminate in a dissertation or other capstone project, such as Doctors of Education, Doctors of Musical Arts, and Doctors of Audiology. This will all likely differ by institution, but provides some context for who may be hooded when.

Interestingly, there are actually different types of hoods for each degree level! At each progression the hood gets longer, and doctoral hoods have a whole extra swoopy bit down the sides. They all have the ridiculous pointy bit at the end of the hood itself though. Sleeves on the robes also change depending on degree level, with Masters robes having the most ridiculous sleeves, but interestingly much like kimono sleeves they're excellent for sticking things like phones in as long as you remember they're there and don't swing them around and knock anyone out. Whoops!

Example of the differences from https://static.scs.georgetown.edu/upload/kb_file/Graduation_Apparel_How_To_Guide_SCS.pdf

image.png.ed8720462e620e5533a16b85f158b517.png

Thank you. I'm ignorant enough that I was trying to figure out why you would wear a hood on your head for graduation. Can you tell I'm not a college graduate - hooded or not. I really feel dumb.

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I have to wear full academic dress for formal work events (usually no more than 3 or 4 times a year) so the hood discussion in my world usually goes along the lines of:

’bloody hoods, WHY do they never stay on our shoulders?! Mine falls down every time and I look shabby. Have you got pins? Can you help me pin mine to my gown please?’

Then we have a big grumble about sexism because hoods (or gowns) aren’t made for women. Only men were supposed to get degrees and our English supply company refuses to budge from tradition by changing their pattern. 

Then we have a whine about the gowns not being suitable for Australian weather. Again - made in England, 100% wool. But hey - the label says Cambridge, so we feel fancy even if we are close to fainting from heat exhaustion 🤣

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I’m a PhD candidate (in Australia) and am glad @metheglyn explained because I didn’t know what “getting hooded” meant. I wore academic dress/robes including a hood when I graduated from my Bachelors and again from my Masters, and there were a couple of PhD grads at each of those ceremonies, but everyone was in the whole kit and caboodle before walking on stage so I didn’t realise “hooding” was a ceremonial thing. Every different degree/faculty had their own colour/material for their hoods, but I don’t recall if different degree levels meant different shapes. I do remember there were some different caps for the rarer higher level research degrees.

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So what’s next for Derick? I have no idea how the US system works. Here (England) once you have your law degree or equivalent you do either the bar or solicitor course then do either pupillage as a barrister or training contract as a solicitor with a law firm/chambers/ government department until you’re fully qualified. Does Derick have to do further study or does he just do on the job training with a law firm? 

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12 hours ago, JDuggs said:

I’m very curious if he’s going to use his law career to push conservative agendas or just to support his family.

Good point.  It would be great if he started working for GRACE (Godly Response to Abuse in the Christian Environment) or similar. 

GRACE was founded by Boz Tchividjian, Billy Graham's grandson and not the scandalous one -- that would be Tullian.  

From the GRACE wiki: 

Quote

In Tchividjian's view, the legalistic, authoritarian culture of some Protestant organizations was particularly susceptible to what he called "spiritual abuse"—the attempt of religious leaders to silence victims or convince them that they deserved their abuse. Tchividjian has stated that "When it comes to child sexual abuse, too many churches and Christian organizations prefer to sacrifice individuals in order to protect themselves. We end up living out the very antithesis of the Gospel that we preach. The consequences are devastating."

I wouldn't blame him for just wanting to make money, though.  He's been in school for 7 years. His undergrad degree is in accounting -- so business law might be a better fit.  I do hope he'll shed his toxic beliefs concerning the sexuality of his fellow humans, though.  The world will be better for it. 

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27 minutes ago, Idlewild said:

So what’s next for Derick? I have no idea how the US system works. Here (England) once you have your law degree or equivalent you do either the bar or solicitor course then do either pupillage as a barrister or training contract as a solicitor with a law firm/chambers/ government department until you’re fully qualified. Does Derick have to do further study or does he just do on the job training with a law firm? 

Most people who get a Juris Doctorate like Derrick will study for the next couple months and then take the Bar Exam in whatever state they’d like to practice in. 

After he passes the Bar, he’s fully qualified. Law school in the US is the further study. In the UK the law degree is kind of like our bachelors (undergraduate) degrees. In the US, you have to already have a bachelors degree to go to law school. 

Now, that’s not to say he would get test results and then the next day argue cases. If he goes into litigation, he’d start as a junior associate somewhere and have to put in long hours as the bottom rung. 

There is potential for additional study if you go into advanced tax law, but it’s not required. 

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@theotherelise thank you for the explanation. It will be interesting to see which direction he takes. Tax would be obvious give. His previous experience but I can see h8m doing something like trying to become a district attorney. 

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6 hours ago, theotherelise said:

Most people who get a Juris Doctorate like Derrick will study for the next couple months and then take the Bar Exam in whatever state they’d like to practice in. 

After he passes the Bar, he’s fully qualified. Law school in the US is the further study. In the UK the law degree is kind of like our bachelors (undergraduate) degrees. In the US, you have to already have a bachelors degree to go to law school. 

Now, that’s not to say he would get test results and then the next day argue cases. If he goes into litigation, he’d start as a junior associate somewhere and have to put in long hours as the bottom rung. 

There is potential for additional study if you go into advanced tax law, but it’s not required. 

On that note, assuming Derick plans to practice law in Arkansas, the dates for the next Arkansas state bar exams are July 27-28, 2021, and then February 25-26, 2022. Many aspiring lawyers have to take the exam more than once, with Arkansas' exam apparently considered the second most difficult after California by some metrics (not necessarily on pass rate itself though). https://crushbarexam.com/which-state-has-the-hardest-bar-exam/ 

Since law school doesn't exactly teach students to pass the bar exam itself, there's a whole secondary market based around bar exam preparation materials and courses, with the Barbri course (www.barbri.com) being one of the most population options, but not the only one. It's another almost $4000 on top of the cost of law school, by the way!

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1 hour ago, RainbowSky said:

So I wonder if anyone is going to call him Dr Dillard now? 

Dr Derwood for me lol 

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21 hours ago, Not that josh's mom said:

Thank you. I'm ignorant enough that I was trying to figure out why you would wear a hood on your head for graduation. Can you tell I'm not a college graduate - hooded or not. I really feel dumb.

I know a lot of people who don’t know the “hoods” are called “hoods.” 😉  I have heard them called “capes” by college students.    And I didn’t know about “hooding” until I was in graduate school, even though my mom had a graduate degree and had been “hooded” in a ceremony. (It happened before I was born).

 Anyway, don’t feel that there is anything wrong with not knowing this. It’s silly, trivial stuff important only when you are involved in it.  😉

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21 hours ago, adidas said:

.... Then we have a whine about the gowns not being suitable for Australian weather. Again - made in England, 100% wool. But hey - the label says Cambridge, so we feel fancy even if we are close to fainting from heat exhaustion 🤣

 
I know what you mean by heat exhaustion!  Regalia goes back to medieval Europe, and was “perfected” during the little Ice Age.  It doesn’t work well for spring and summer graduations in the US.

My academic regalia is made of polyester (not my choice, it was what was offered).  It looks like broadcloth and velvet ( with the hood also having satin) and it is just as hot as wool — worse, because it doesn’t breathe.   The main use of the graduation “program” booklets was as a fan. 😉  
 
I won’t be wearing it again though, because I just retired. 

 

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So since people are talking about law degrees, I've been learning a lot about the legal field and I find that I am really interested in being a paralegal. I'm in my 30s and have young children and work full-time so I'm not sure if it would be worth it to change careers since I'd have to do some sort of training course first. Currently I work at a nonprofit in operations and my bachelors degree has nothing to do with my current job or the legal field. My biggest fear is to invest money in training and then hate the job, and also although I'd be new to the field, I wouldn't be new to working professionally and I'm worried I'd be treated poorly by lawyers - like I'm not expecting a boss to roll out the red carpet and cater to me, but I have read some paralegal stories about big ego lawyers. Are there paralegals on FJ who would share a little about their experience?

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@bertnee I feel you! Since my company unexpectedly closed down in February and I have not been able to find a new position because of my by now very visible pregnancy, I have been thinking of looking into a career in accounting.

I'm in a very similar position as you are, and finding myself mulling the very same questions.

I guess the answer would be better late than never? No idea, but if any paralegals or accountants on FJ would be willing to chime in, it would be much appreciated :)

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I have my paralegal degree, though I barely used it. I worked at a non profit that wasn’t very well run. I ended up doing more secretarial work than paralegal. It’s like any job- some coworkers have big egos, others treat you very warmly. 
 

personally, I make more money as a nanny! Nearly twice as what I got paid at  a law firm. I really suggest you take a job focused on the kind  of specialty you like if possible, to make it interesting . I enjoyed family law and hearing peoples crazy stories. Hated, hated, hated real estate . So boring to me. 
 

I guess I didn’t give that career much of a chance, but why stay when I get paid more to have fun with kids? Leaving worked out for me. 

Edited by FleeJanaFree
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