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Coconut Flan

Maxwell 44: Must We Permit Mephistopheles and Beelzebub to Perform Financial and Performance Audits

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daisyjane1234

re: Four point eleven.

I wondered about John 4.11.  

Beloved, if God so loved us, we ought also to love one another. (KJV)

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Rosie
5 hours ago, mango_fandango said:

Teri has written a post on making soup. This bit struck me:

“allowing each person to choose how much he wants in his serving” (bolding mine)

Why the male pronoun, when 4 out of 5 of the inhabitants of the MaxBorg are female? Why not just use “they/their”??

Teri may also do a post on bean soup in the future. Apparently one of the Maxwell daughters “doesn’t do well eating beans”. Wonder what that means, particularly since they eat bean burritos so often!! 

My inner fourth-grade boy is wondering which of the daughters farts a lot, and how the Maxwells react to farting.

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NoseyNellie

Add me to the list that Teri cannot cook on the fly..that she needs a recipe for even a basic soup.. and cannot figure out the spices and seasonings by her own taste.  

Baking.. yeah.. that takes more science with leavening and correct moisture levels on many items.  

 

But I WILL give credit where it is due.. although the topic was pretty dull.. it was one of the more info filled posts in a long time!  

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browngrl

I tend to look at recipes as suggestions not rules.This is particularly true for soup which is a great way to use up left overs and odds and ends left in the fridge. So I was set to snark on Teri but then I remembered an instagram post by Jill Rodrigues. She posted the most awful looking soup - it looked more like toxic brown sludge than anything edible. Clearly there are some fundies who need Teri's cooking tutorial.

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DooDahDame

Sorry to be a downer but could the book be about COVID and the elderly, from the former Church of St. Maxwell, who died and didn’t know where they would be going? I really don’t think Sarah has the empathy to tackle that subject and we all know she doesn’t have the skill nor the talent.

As for washing dirty windows, just close the damn drapes!

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Dru
On 11/14/2020 at 6:02 AM, freejugar said:

I don't know how Chris makes a living to support his wife and kids (and medical bills!). He shoots one wedding a year or so, and he only has 5 websites he's done, some of them are quite old. 

He is the one I really don't get how he's supporting his family. Nate has a legit consulting service, Joe and Jessie are legit programmers at SO, and John is doing his thing with irrigation. The ladies, of course, live at home, so there's that.

On 11/14/2020 at 6:30 PM, sparkles said:

Damn, Swift Otter actually had a pretty decent site at one point but they’ve gone off the deep-end again. What a mess! I’m pretty sure that Steve was gone from the site at one point but he just can’t stay away it seems. Chief Synergist. Please. 👀 You name is Steve Maxwell, not Steve Jobs. And even Steve Jobs wouldn’t have given himself a dumb ass title like that.

Not for nothing, but some of their non-family staff look like they just got out of puberty and their pimples have cleared up. I know that tech is an industry where it’s not unusual to be young but they really do look like kids. 

Oh man! I remember the site being pretty decent last time I looked at it. Wow! What a mess! I wonder what happened, because from what I had gleaned they are a legit busy business.

13 hours ago, Austrian Atheist said:

Our family enjoys soup year round. For most of my married life, I made soup from a recipe. Then my daughter, Anna, introduced me to making soup with a general plan but not specifics. Isn’t it great when our children become our teachers?

Terri has had experience in cooking soup for a big family of at least ten eaters for decades - and she seems to be amazed that this task is possible without a recipe. Come on Terri, it is soup - not rocket since! 

As much as I hate to stick up for Teri, I was a strict recipe follower before my divorce. My mom didn't really cook, I ate out as a young adult, and then my (ex) husband cooked. It wasn't until after my divorce and all the fun financial shit that goes along with that that I had to really start learning to cook.

 

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DonutWench
9 hours ago, Rosie said:

My inner fourth-grade boy is wondering which of the daughters farts a lot, and how the Maxwells react to farting.

Lol! To be fair, beans of all kinds really hurt my stomach and make me feel bloated and awful, so I avoid them at all costs, but (thankfully?) don’t have this particular effect, so that may not be the issue. 

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Dominionatrix

Teri asked readers to comment with soup tips, but the first comment is just an off-topic compliment, and Teri’s response is absolutely cracking me up. 

Sorry, Cyndi, but if you don’t make soup, Teri simply does not have the time!

 

74EA262C-3F4E-4D47-95BD-EA1B6A532A8B.jpeg

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HereticHick

"Are you a soup maker, Cyndi?" gives me a "What's the Frequency Kenneth" kind of vibe

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fundiefan

When I make something for the first time, I typically follow a recipe. I like browsing recipes & finding new things to try. But, if it turns out to be something I like & want to make again, I'll forego the recipe. Or, maybe use certain parts as a jumping off point. 

I don't like any frozen veggies in soup and I don't like green beans or corn in any form in soup. But otherwise, just about anything goes. The most important part of soup, to me, is the broth & how it tastes. You know, herbs & spices. Those things Teri knew nothing about until her daughter became the spice queen of the house. 

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SPHASH

New book has been dropped.  Apparently Aunt Shannon caused an accident that killed Emma's little sister.

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freejugar

I'm surprised the title isn't matchy matchy as with the Moody series.

Wasn't there a mean aunt Nicole too in the last book? how many horrible aunts does Mollie Moody 2.0 have?

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jegfile

Did Mary do the illustrations? I loved the double page one. Give credit where credit is due, Sarah!

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freejugar

wait, whose sister died, aunt shannon's sister (emma's aunt) or emma's sister?

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deborahlynn1979

The book is recommended for ages 7 - 12. When I was 12, I was reading V.C. Andrews and sneak-reading Harlequin Romance titles, along with all the Michael Crichton I could find. I can't imagine someone on the cusp of puberty wanting to read this dreck.

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Nothing if not critical

I'm confused by the capitalisation and the lack of an article for "Landlady" - makes her sound like an ominous supernatural entity... 😱

Edited by Nothing if not critical

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fundiefan

Of course aunt Shannon was forgiven only AFTER Emma becomes a Christian and has a whole new sparkle. 

Because no heathen non Christian could possibly forgive an accident. Or have a sparkly life. 

At 12, I read Follett's Eye of the Needle. I was reading more, but I remember that one because I read it on the plane to visit my grandfather - my first trip on a plane. 

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HereticHick
27 minutes ago, deborahlynn1979 said:

The book is recommended for ages 7 - 12. When I was 12, I was reading V.C. Andrews and sneak-reading Harlequin Romance titles, along with all the Michael Crichton I could find. I can't imagine someone on the cusp of puberty wanting to read this dreck.

And passing around Judy Blume's Forever?

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fundiefan

I watched he videos for Sarah's book and their "14th printing" of Meek & Quite spirt BS.

I'm thinking their whole making good communicators thing was geared solely towards the boys. 

Sarah is terrible in both videos. Like, really bad. No doubt she was speaking in front of her father or mother while recording, and she still talked like she was scared shitless. Stunted, muffled, and not rehearsed at all. 

Those videos are huge arguments against the Maxwell way of teaching to communicate. 

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NoseyNellie

Oh Yes!  All the forbidden Judy Blume books were smuggled in and read in my room!  VC Andrews were also devoured!  Pre-teen to early teen years were also the Ann Rule years.. Loved so true crime/non fiction!  Scared myself silly expecting to be kidnapped and murdered at any time!  

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usedbicycle

When I was 12 I read Catcher in the Rye in one sitting and was forever changed. Holden Caulfield hiring a prostitute and then just wanting to talk instead was so angsty and chivalrous at the same time. 

55 minutes ago, fundiefan said:

Sarah is terrible in both videos. Like, really bad. No doubt she was speaking in front of her father or mother while recording, and she still talked like she was scared shitless. Stunted, muffled, and not rehearsed at all. 

Those are hard to watch. If someone I knew spoke like that, I would tactfully ask them if they were depressed. And WTF is up with Teri's clickbait new chapter "My Greatest Lesson since Writing this Book" in her homeschooling manual? It's probably something totally unhelpful like never skip your morning devotions.

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Maggie Mae

How can a book be aimed toward 7-12? When I was 7 I was reading Baby-Sitter's Club, sweet valley, Sleepover Club, etc. By the time I was 12, I was reading a combination of YA and Adult books - Jurassic Park,  Christopher Pike, Fear Street, VC Andrews, etc. 

There's such a range of abilities and interests and growth between those ages. At some point in there, I read Judy Blume and the Barthe DeClements books (is she still alive?), Paula Danzinger, The Wayside Stories, and so on. 

She's signing the first 100 copies sold! But due to "high demand" she can't possibly fit any personalization into her very busy schedule of dusting ceiling fans and not washing Grandma's windows. 

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fundiefan

Anyone watch Forever with Dean Butler? My mom let us watch it. I don't remember how close it was to the book or if they even mentioned "Ralph". But, the fact that my mom let her 11 year old watch it tells you how little things were censored in my growing up years. 

I remember Dean Butler starting on LHOTP shortly after that and my pre-teen friends and I were in love & still called him Michael.

 

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SPHASH

Between the ages of 7 through 12 I was reading or a teacher was reading to me Sweet Pickles series, Sweet Valley High, Encycolpedia Brown, Beverly Cleary, Judy Blume, and Laura Ingalls Wilder.  8th grade I was into the A Girl called Al series.

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JordynDarby5

I was reading Babysitters Club, Nancy Drew and Sweet Valley during 7-12, VC Andrews, Fear Street, Harlequin, Nora Roberts, history books, biographies and murder mysteries from 12 on. Most wouldn't have been allowed but I usually sneaked them with my backpack and hiding them behind books they would approve of. 

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