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Mom's Corner by Teri

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Caroline
2 hours ago, fundiefan said:

I did Christmas shopping for my great niece & nephews this weekend. They are 3, 6 & 14. 

Their mom suggested, for the younger ones, books & something they can "make"/be creative with. For the teenager, my budget can't cover most of his wants, so she just said cash & chocolate. For them all, I typically get them a bag of "stocking stuffer" candy/trinkets along with their gifts. Mostly because I am far from a primary gift giver & when we are all together opening gifts, I like to see them revel in happiness at ALL THE CANDY since I never provide the shiny gift. Plus, great-aunt here. I don't have to put them bed after all that sugar. 

It kind of made me sad for the Maxhell offspring while picking it all out. Growing up without anything fun & random. Nothing just for the sake of being happy in the moment. For the teen, he is getting $25 in cash, but in 5's & singles, each wrapped around a candy bar, stuffed in a bag of more chocolate. For the littles, they got a book each - both have non human characters! the horrors -  to go with their bags of candy & finger paints & stamping kits. 

Nothing edifying. Nothing they can make a living at. But, creativity, imagination, and good old sugar filled fun. 

I don't say this to toot my horn, I'm pretty sure everyone who can does similar - candy is part of the season for kids (and adults). I say this because really, it's so innocuous, so irrelevant to anything - how we shop for loved ones - but it inspires a spark of sadness at the kids who spent their lives experiencing none of it. And while the sad fact of life is that there are far too many kids who don't get to experience it, due to finances/parental situations, the Maxhells had the means to bring joy to their children, they simply chose not to. While the parents without the means would do anything to spark that joy in their children if they could, just for one day. 

I'm pretty sure their god is shaking his/her head at Steve & Teri and how they have deprived their offspring of...life. 

 

You're a wonderful aunt!  My favorite aunt /second mom is 93.  She worked hard all of her life doing factory work and caring for her bed-ridden mother, my grandmother,  for many years.  She did it joyfully, never made a lot of money, but enriched our lives in too many ways to count.  She never married or had children of her own, but treated my siblings, cousins, and me as her own.    She always did exactly what you are doing:  She gave us humble gifts, beautifully and thoughtfully put together.  She was also a magnificent gift wrapper.   She made every holiday special in the simplest of ways. We knew how much she loved us.   She suffers from severe dementia now, doesn't know who we are, but is always happy to see us when we visit.  Unfortunately she's in a nursing home and only my sister and cousin who live nearby have been able to visit for 30 minutes at at time on very specific days of the month.  She's a wonderful human being who gave so much of herself to us.    You are doing the same for the younger people in your family.  How lucky for them :)

Edited by Caroline

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Bluebirdbluebell

Two things:

1. I have to admit that it makes sense to me to put some restriction on children's reading. However I wouldn't be surprised if the live at-home children still face scrutiny in their reading choices. 

2. The main thing that still bothers me about the latest mom's corner is that Sarah is writing to Steve's and Teri's specifications. I wonder if she was able to write freely that would change her writing. 

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crawfishgirl

I think that the main reason she writes is to provide another income stream for the family.  When her first book was free on Amazon (many years ago), I read part of it.  The young characters did things such as baking and dog-sitting to raise money.  Those stories seem to reflect her home life.  Rearing eight kids is not cheap, and since fun and an advanced education is not allowed, it is an acceptable way to supplement the household income. 

                  

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Hane

@crawfishgirl, and that book gave us a glimpse into life in Maxhell: Mom Moody spends most of her time in her room “reading the Bible,” and can’t be arsed to play a game with her family or help her daughter learn how to bake, and Dad Moody is a smug, self-righteous so-and-so.

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Lady Grass Lake
On 12/6/2020 at 12:58 PM, fundiefan said:

I did Christmas shopping for my great niece & nephews this weekend. They are 3, 6 & 14. 

Their mom suggested, for the younger ones, books & something they can "make"/be creative with. For the teenager, my budget can't cover most of his wants, so she just said cash & chocolate. For them all, I typically get them a bag of "stocking stuffer" candy/trinkets along with their gifts. Mostly because I am far from a primary gift giver & when we are all together opening gifts, I like to see them revel in happiness at ALL THE CANDY since I never provide the shiny gift. Plus, great-aunt here. I don't have to put them bed after all that sugar. 

It kind of made me sad for the Maxhell offspring while picking it all out. Growing up without anything fun & random. Nothing just for the sake of being happy in the moment. For the teen, he is getting $25 in cash, but in 5's & singles, each wrapped around a candy bar, stuffed in a bag of more chocolate. For the littles, they got a book each - both have non human characters! the horrors -  to go with their bags of candy & finger paints & stamping kits. 

Nothing edifying. Nothing they can make a living at. But, creativity, imagination, and good old sugar filled fun. 

I don't say this to toot my horn, I'm pretty sure everyone who can does similar - candy is part of the season for kids (and adults). I say this because really, it's so innocuous, so irrelevant to anything - how we shop for loved ones - but it inspires a spark of sadness at the kids who spent their lives experiencing none of it. And while the sad fact of life is that there are far too many kids who don't get to experience it, due to finances/parental situations, the Maxhells had the means to bring joy to their children, they simply chose not to. While the parents without the means would do anything to spark that joy in their children if they could, just for one day. 

I'm pretty sure their god is shaking his/her head at Steve & Teri and how they have deprived their offspring of...life. 

 

For future years, there is a website called bitsandpieces.com that also sends out a catalog.  They have not only jigsaw puzzles but all kinds of other puzzles.  They have brainteasers, things like the old metal wire puzzles but also puzzle boxes, and these very devious money holders, where you have to solve the device before you can get to the money inside.   I have a lot of nephews an nieces and they all want money, so we've tried to find ways to outsmart them.  You'd have to know your recipient, if they like puzzles or not, but their catalog alone is fun to read.        

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PennySycamore

@Lady Grass Lake,  I just got a catalogue from Bits and Pieces a few days ago.  I wish my husband would look for gifts for the grandkids there instead of on Amazon.  

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Joe Pukepail
On 12/4/2020 at 7:18 PM, mango_fandango said:

The only way I can imagine saying no about reading material to a young person (tween age/early adolescence) is if it contained adult/violent material such as rape or similar. I read Jacqueline Wilson’s autobiography of her early teens (from about 11-14) where she mentioned reading Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov and she was really disturbed by it. And she has been vocal in the past about not restricting reading material for kids based on age. 

My mom never restricted anything I read. I definitely read things that were beyond my ability to really understand, but in a way, I think that helped prepare me for real life.

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HeartsAFundie
On 12/8/2020 at 6:36 PM, PennySycamore said:

@Lady Grass Lake,  I just got a catalogue from Bits and Pieces a few days ago.  I wish my husband would look for gifts for the grandkids there instead of on Amazon.  

We have a round pizza puzzle from Bits and Pieces.  It was by far one of the toughest puzzles we ever completed.    

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PennySycamore

@HeartsAFundie, my mom almost always was working on a jigsaw puzzle.  Her dad was the same way.  She also loved crosswords and crytograms.  

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smittykins

My mom used to do jigsaw puzzles; I don’t have the patience for it.  I know I’ve seen round one-color puzzles.

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sparkles

NM

Edited by sparkles

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Bluebirdbluebell

The new Mom's Corner by Teri sounds like Steve wrote it.  It is about the importance of reading the bible and spending time with the bible every day even while you have babies and toddlers.

It's an extremely emotional, overwrought post about reading the bible.  

Their advice is to go to bed earlier and get up earlier to read God's word.  That will not work for all families especially those with newborns or newborns and older children. 

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allyisyourpally5

Technically speaking that doesn’t really change the day length?

On a work day I’m awake at 5:30am and often going to bed at 9ish (if I’m sensible and haven’t got any work left) because otherwise I’ll get exhausted - I hardly sit down all day and have to be so switched on. 

On the contrary, on weekends or school holidays, I’ll sleep in until 9 easily, and go to bed way past midnight - it’s probably the same length day in reality! 
 

Steve some people go to that place called work, you once did, even if half your family don’t know the full true meaning of “going to work” and don’t want to get up even earlier to read the Bible again and again. Personally I would say quality time, not quantity. Stop and enjoy your life a bit man!

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ClareDeLune

Steve is writing about training babies in church, and teri is writing about getting up early when you have babies and toddlers. 

I bet they are aiming it at one of their son's families!  The young ones must definitely be doing things wrong with all their trips and church friends and fun!

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fundiefan

They are pushing their books/scheduling wares hard lately. Everything they post comes down to "scheduling is the answer" - and of course, they have the means for you to implement it! Send them money & they'll show you the magical answer to all your problems. 

As the year closed and the new one began, did you evaluate yourself spiritually, looking back and looking forward? Can you see spiritual growth in your life? If so, do you want more? If not, do you want it this year?

I can say easily & confidently that the answer to every one of Teri's little questions meant to make you demean yourself, is a resounding NO. 

Since they pay lip service to people making time for what they want to make time for - again, in a condescending Maxwell way - I have to say I agree. And, it's not a new concept and there is absolutely nothing wrong with it. 

 

 

 

 

 

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allyisyourpally5

Does anyone have a copy of the scheduling book?  It always seemed pretty huge and I don’t get what it really needs to be filled with.....

likewise that chore pack one - once you’ve seen a Chore Pack, do you really need to buy the books? It’s a pretty simple concept..... 

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smittykins
On 1/23/2021 at 1:26 PM, allyisyourpally5 said:

likewise that chore pack one - once you’ve seen a Chore Pack, do you really need to buy the books? It’s a pretty simple concept..... 

Yup, I once Googled “chore packs” and found several bloggers use the basic concept without actually buying the Maxwell merch(3x5 cards, lanyards, plastic ID card sleeves, all of which is probably much cheaper than the books).

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