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Mom's Corner by Teri


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Caroline
2 hours ago, fundiefan said:

I did Christmas shopping for my great niece & nephews this weekend. They are 3, 6 & 14. 

Their mom suggested, for the younger ones, books & something they can "make"/be creative with. For the teenager, my budget can't cover most of his wants, so she just said cash & chocolate. For them all, I typically get them a bag of "stocking stuffer" candy/trinkets along with their gifts. Mostly because I am far from a primary gift giver & when we are all together opening gifts, I like to see them revel in happiness at ALL THE CANDY since I never provide the shiny gift. Plus, great-aunt here. I don't have to put them bed after all that sugar. 

It kind of made me sad for the Maxhell offspring while picking it all out. Growing up without anything fun & random. Nothing just for the sake of being happy in the moment. For the teen, he is getting $25 in cash, but in 5's & singles, each wrapped around a candy bar, stuffed in a bag of more chocolate. For the littles, they got a book each - both have non human characters! the horrors -  to go with their bags of candy & finger paints & stamping kits. 

Nothing edifying. Nothing they can make a living at. But, creativity, imagination, and good old sugar filled fun. 

I don't say this to toot my horn, I'm pretty sure everyone who can does similar - candy is part of the season for kids (and adults). I say this because really, it's so innocuous, so irrelevant to anything - how we shop for loved ones - but it inspires a spark of sadness at the kids who spent their lives experiencing none of it. And while the sad fact of life is that there are far too many kids who don't get to experience it, due to finances/parental situations, the Maxhells had the means to bring joy to their children, they simply chose not to. While the parents without the means would do anything to spark that joy in their children if they could, just for one day. 

I'm pretty sure their god is shaking his/her head at Steve & Teri and how they have deprived their offspring of...life. 

 

You're a wonderful aunt!  My favorite aunt /second mom is 93.  She worked hard all of her life doing factory work and caring for her bed-ridden mother, my grandmother,  for many years.  She did it joyfully, never made a lot of money, but enriched our lives in too many ways to count.  She never married or had children of her own, but treated my siblings, cousins, and me as her own.    She always did exactly what you are doing:  She gave us humble gifts, beautifully and thoughtfully put together.  She was also a magnificent gift wrapper.   She made every holiday special in the simplest of ways. We knew how much she loved us.   She suffers from severe dementia now, doesn't know who we are, but is always happy to see us when we visit.  Unfortunately she's in a nursing home and only my sister and cousin who live nearby have been able to visit for 30 minutes at at time on very specific days of the month.  She's a wonderful human being who gave so much of herself to us.    You are doing the same for the younger people in your family.  How lucky for them :)

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Teri and Steve don't want to give children "appetites" for spending their teen years reading?? Teri writes in the latest Mom's Corner; "We don’t, however, want to give these children appetit

So reading is acceptable as long as it's for enlightenment or punishment. Oh Teri, you pathetic wizened husk of a human being, I hope all your children and grandchildren read every book they can

Husband attends a yearly computer conference for the system he works on, and it's always in a different city.  Company pays for his travel, accommondations and meals.  Since he refuses to fly, they wi

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Bluebirdbluebell

Two things:

1. I have to admit that it makes sense to me to put some restriction on children's reading. However I wouldn't be surprised if the live at-home children still face scrutiny in their reading choices. 

2. The main thing that still bothers me about the latest mom's corner is that Sarah is writing to Steve's and Teri's specifications. I wonder if she was able to write freely that would change her writing. 

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crawfishgirl

I think that the main reason she writes is to provide another income stream for the family.  When her first book was free on Amazon (many years ago), I read part of it.  The young characters did things such as baking and dog-sitting to raise money.  Those stories seem to reflect her home life.  Rearing eight kids is not cheap, and since fun and an advanced education is not allowed, it is an acceptable way to supplement the household income. 

                  

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@crawfishgirl, and that book gave us a glimpse into life in Maxhell: Mom Moody spends most of her time in her room “reading the Bible,” and can’t be arsed to play a game with her family or help her daughter learn how to bake, and Dad Moody is a smug, self-righteous so-and-so.

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Lady Grass Lake
On 12/6/2020 at 12:58 PM, fundiefan said:

I did Christmas shopping for my great niece & nephews this weekend. They are 3, 6 & 14. 

Their mom suggested, for the younger ones, books & something they can "make"/be creative with. For the teenager, my budget can't cover most of his wants, so she just said cash & chocolate. For them all, I typically get them a bag of "stocking stuffer" candy/trinkets along with their gifts. Mostly because I am far from a primary gift giver & when we are all together opening gifts, I like to see them revel in happiness at ALL THE CANDY since I never provide the shiny gift. Plus, great-aunt here. I don't have to put them bed after all that sugar. 

It kind of made me sad for the Maxhell offspring while picking it all out. Growing up without anything fun & random. Nothing just for the sake of being happy in the moment. For the teen, he is getting $25 in cash, but in 5's & singles, each wrapped around a candy bar, stuffed in a bag of more chocolate. For the littles, they got a book each - both have non human characters! the horrors -  to go with their bags of candy & finger paints & stamping kits. 

Nothing edifying. Nothing they can make a living at. But, creativity, imagination, and good old sugar filled fun. 

I don't say this to toot my horn, I'm pretty sure everyone who can does similar - candy is part of the season for kids (and adults). I say this because really, it's so innocuous, so irrelevant to anything - how we shop for loved ones - but it inspires a spark of sadness at the kids who spent their lives experiencing none of it. And while the sad fact of life is that there are far too many kids who don't get to experience it, due to finances/parental situations, the Maxhells had the means to bring joy to their children, they simply chose not to. While the parents without the means would do anything to spark that joy in their children if they could, just for one day. 

I'm pretty sure their god is shaking his/her head at Steve & Teri and how they have deprived their offspring of...life. 

 

For future years, there is a website called bitsandpieces.com that also sends out a catalog.  They have not only jigsaw puzzles but all kinds of other puzzles.  They have brainteasers, things like the old metal wire puzzles but also puzzle boxes, and these very devious money holders, where you have to solve the device before you can get to the money inside.   I have a lot of nephews an nieces and they all want money, so we've tried to find ways to outsmart them.  You'd have to know your recipient, if they like puzzles or not, but their catalog alone is fun to read.        

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PennySycamore

@Lady Grass Lake,  I just got a catalogue from Bits and Pieces a few days ago.  I wish my husband would look for gifts for the grandkids there instead of on Amazon.  

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Joe Pukepail
On 12/4/2020 at 7:18 PM, mango_fandango said:

The only way I can imagine saying no about reading material to a young person (tween age/early adolescence) is if it contained adult/violent material such as rape or similar. I read Jacqueline Wilson’s autobiography of her early teens (from about 11-14) where she mentioned reading Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov and she was really disturbed by it. And she has been vocal in the past about not restricting reading material for kids based on age. 

My mom never restricted anything I read. I definitely read things that were beyond my ability to really understand, but in a way, I think that helped prepare me for real life.

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HeartsAFundie
On 12/8/2020 at 6:36 PM, PennySycamore said:

@Lady Grass Lake,  I just got a catalogue from Bits and Pieces a few days ago.  I wish my husband would look for gifts for the grandkids there instead of on Amazon.  

We have a round pizza puzzle from Bits and Pieces.  It was by far one of the toughest puzzles we ever completed.    

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smittykins

My mom used to do jigsaw puzzles; I don’t have the patience for it.  I know I’ve seen round one-color puzzles.

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Bluebirdbluebell

The new Mom's Corner by Teri sounds like Steve wrote it.  It is about the importance of reading the bible and spending time with the bible every day even while you have babies and toddlers.

It's an extremely emotional, overwrought post about reading the bible.  

Their advice is to go to bed earlier and get up earlier to read God's word.  That will not work for all families especially those with newborns or newborns and older children. 

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allyisyourpally5

Technically speaking that doesn’t really change the day length?

On a work day I’m awake at 5:30am and often going to bed at 9ish (if I’m sensible and haven’t got any work left) because otherwise I’ll get exhausted - I hardly sit down all day and have to be so switched on. 

On the contrary, on weekends or school holidays, I’ll sleep in until 9 easily, and go to bed way past midnight - it’s probably the same length day in reality! 
 

Steve some people go to that place called work, you once did, even if half your family don’t know the full true meaning of “going to work” and don’t want to get up even earlier to read the Bible again and again. Personally I would say quality time, not quantity. Stop and enjoy your life a bit man!

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ClareDeLune

Steve is writing about training babies in church, and teri is writing about getting up early when you have babies and toddlers. 

I bet they are aiming it at one of their son's families!  The young ones must definitely be doing things wrong with all their trips and church friends and fun!

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fundiefan

They are pushing their books/scheduling wares hard lately. Everything they post comes down to "scheduling is the answer" - and of course, they have the means for you to implement it! Send them money & they'll show you the magical answer to all your problems. 

As the year closed and the new one began, did you evaluate yourself spiritually, looking back and looking forward? Can you see spiritual growth in your life? If so, do you want more? If not, do you want it this year?

I can say easily & confidently that the answer to every one of Teri's little questions meant to make you demean yourself, is a resounding NO. 

Since they pay lip service to people making time for what they want to make time for - again, in a condescending Maxwell way - I have to say I agree. And, it's not a new concept and there is absolutely nothing wrong with it. 

 

 

 

 

 

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allyisyourpally5

Does anyone have a copy of the scheduling book?  It always seemed pretty huge and I don’t get what it really needs to be filled with.....

likewise that chore pack one - once you’ve seen a Chore Pack, do you really need to buy the books? It’s a pretty simple concept..... 

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smittykins
On 1/23/2021 at 1:26 PM, allyisyourpally5 said:

likewise that chore pack one - once you’ve seen a Chore Pack, do you really need to buy the books? It’s a pretty simple concept..... 

Yup, I once Googled “chore packs” and found several bloggers use the basic concept without actually buying the Maxwell merch(3x5 cards, lanyards, plastic ID card sleeves, all of which is probably much cheaper than the books).

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danvillebelle

I owned the scheduling book 20+ years ago.  As we've said repeatedly in the other main thread, they are hopelessly out of date.  When they started their brand, smartphones didn't exist and not that many people were on the internet.  Now everyone has the equivalent of a computer in their pocket and can set up schedules and timers and whatever they want in seconds.  As far as I know, the content of that book has not changed all this time.  I mean, it discussed baby and preschooler schedules, because Mary was a toddler when they wrote it.  

The only people I can see purchasing it now are a) families as self-isolating as they were/are, b) women who like cutting/pasting projects as a hobby or a means to relax.  Otherwise it is full of nothing but basic common sense about ordering your day, and the Maxwell's particular boring, self-flagellating take on Christian life.  

The Christian homeschooling wave they were riding was a dependable source of income in the late 90's/early 2000's (see also: Vision Forum).  It's just not any more - it's been totally replaced with blogs, Instagram and apps.

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Bluebirdbluebell
7 hours ago, danvillebelle said:

I owned the scheduling book 20+ years ago.  As we've said repeatedly in the other main thread, they are hopelessly out of date.  When they started their brand, smartphones didn't exist and not that many people were on the internet.  Now everyone has the equivalent of a computer in their pocket and can set up schedules and timers and whatever they want in seconds.  As far as I know, the content of that book has not changed all this time.  I mean, it discussed baby and preschooler schedules, because Mary was a toddler when they wrote it.  

The only people I can see purchasing it now are a) families as self-isolating as they were/are, b) women who like cutting/pasting projects as a hobby or a means to relax.  Otherwise it is full of nothing but basic common sense about ordering your day, and the Maxwell's particular boring, self-flagellating take on Christian life.  

The Christian homeschooling wave they were riding was a dependable source of income in the late 90's/early 2000's (see also: Vision Forum).  It's just not any more - it's been totally replaced with blogs, Instagram and apps.

Other people I see purchasing it now include women who are burned out from taking care of a large expanding brood, and homeschooling, who are desperately seeking any help they can get.

I also think there are advantages to posting a schedule where the kids can see it versus having it on your phone where only the mother can see it. 

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allyisyourpally5

I agree a visual schedule is probably beneficial to many kids but I’m pretty sure you can make a grid and print it out - you don’t need their “scheduling kit”.

Having said that didn’t they do an online scheduling system of some kind? Not sure if it’s still running - but you had to buy the book new  and then pay for the program - don’t know if that’s still in existence.

They need to reformat all of those Managers items into Apps and forums - charge a monthly subscription if they wish but they need to move on, especially if they promote themselves as IT experts. They could actually slot into the market if they worked at it. The problem is they’re late. Thousands of homeschooler instagrams already exist and they’ve finished homeschooling. Plenty of Christian families on social media. Plenty of Apps to help with daily planning already exist. They need to think harder.

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Hane

@allyisyourpally5, keep in mind that it’s only recently Sarah shared with us the wonder that is Google.

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Coconut Flan
2 hours ago, allyisyourpally5 said:

I agree a visual schedule is probably beneficial to many kids but I’m pretty sure you can make a grid and print it out - you don’t need their “scheduling kit”.

When COVID at home instruction began last spring, one of the first things my daughter did was put up a schedule for each kid.  It was an obvious no-brainer need.  She didn't need a book, charts, instructions, etc.  All it took was a sheet of printer paper and a black marker.  Life isn't so tough when you don't make each tiny thing a huge deal as the Maxwells tend to do.

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Elegant Mess
3 hours ago, allyisyourpally5 said:

They need to think harder.

That's what concerns me.  They don't strike me as creative enough to think outside the box.

Couple this with their isolation, they may not know where there's a niche to exploit.

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kpmom

When COVID was first new the Maxwell's did try to use it to sell more of their MOTH books and scheduling kits, but I really wonder how many young parents want to bother with a handmade schedule when there are so many other options.

@allyisyourpally5they do still sell SchedulingBreeze , their internet based schedule maker, but as you said, you still have to buy the book plus pay $15 per year (Which the Maxwells helpfully point out divides out to $1.25 per month 😄).

TBH, looking at Scheduling Breeze, I'm not sure why anyone would pay for that and not just use an Excel type program to make up a schedule. s

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allyisyourpally5
11 hours ago, kpmom said:

When COVID was first new the Maxwell's did try to use it to sell more of their MOTH books and scheduling kits, but I really wonder how many young parents want to bother with a handmade schedule when there are so many other options.

@allyisyourpally5they do still sell SchedulingBreeze , their internet based schedule maker, but as you said, you still have to buy the book plus pay $15 per year (Which the Maxwells helpfully point out divides out to $1.25 per month 😄).

TBH, looking at Scheduling Breeze, I'm not sure why anyone would pay for that and not just use an Excel type program to make up a schedule. s

Thank you for reminding me! I knew there was something.....

Yes this is the issue.....they have thought to move their program online but haven’t made it unique and original enough (or worth it) and you STILL have to purchase the book. And people these days often don’t like annual payments and subscriptions - they want to pay by the month and drop out anytime. 
 

I forgot about the invention of google that we were introduced to not long back.

Im assuming that the brothers (especially the younger) have managed to keep themselves a bit more up to date, otherwise their businesses will fail. 
 

If they want to push themselves as experts on homeschooling, they really need to involve one of the “extended” families and push them to the front as the visual face of the brand. Yes, Teri has 30 years of experience but, for one thing she’s done and people like to hear from others going through the same as them and feel like someone’s by their side, and second of all she paints homeschooling as so hard and miserable.
People want someone they can relate too - I’m seeing it on Facebook all the time right now “Oh my goodness I tried to do math with the children today and I used real food to add together and they just ate it all instead!!! Anyone else doing as terribly as me?” Steve and Teri are no longer relatable. They’re old. They’re not juggling full time parenthood anymore and when they did, the world was not the same. New issues and technology and opportunities and such are there.

Plus even with just how many hard right evangelical Christians there are, I still think the Maxwells are just that bit too extreme and that bit too.....boring! So many “no can’t do that”

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Foudeb

The current crisis is probably not helping them at all - their usp was homeschooling and isolation as the one true way. Now everyone is homeschooling and isolating so we all know what it's like, and that it sucks. (no offence to the dedicated homeschoolers out there, if you can teach hats off to you. Many of us can't, and therefore leave it to the professionals). 

They don't even come across with a "we'll make it easy for you" vibe, it's more "you'll be in the trenches and will really suffer but that's what God wants" which is... Not appealing. 

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