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Branch Trumpvidians 4: Deplorables Are Everywhere


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My mom's neighborhood is infested with Branch Trumpvidians. This was from the 4th of July.

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18 hours ago, Howl said:

Waves of joy washed over me as I read this tweet: 

 

 

 

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A disgusting fuck face supporter has been found guilty. 

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The self-described “Trump man” who repeatedly defecated and urinated in front of a neighbor’s home because the residents are Joe Biden-supporting Democrats has been found guilty and sentenced for his nasty antics, Ohio court records show.

Jerry Detrick, 70, was cited for littering in late-May after being caught in the act of relieving himself at 3:15 AM in front of the residence Matthew Guyette, 59, shares with his husband. Detrick and Guyette live near each other in Greenville, a western Ohio city.

Guyette called 911 after spotting a man squatting down near a privet hedge. Cops subsequently identified Detrick, a retired high school teacher, as a suspect in the May 30 incident. During police questioning, Detrick confessed and admitted to defecating on Guyette’s property "multiple times."

Pictured above, Detrick said he targeted his neighbor’s home because Guyette and his spouse "are Democrats and support Joe Biden.” Detrick described himself as a “Trump man,” leading cops to conclude that “this incident is politically motivated," according to a police report.

 

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2 hours ago, 47of74 said:

A disgusting fuck face supporter has been found guilty. 

 

Yuck.  Charged with "littering?"  Is that the best they can do?  

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2 hours ago, Cartmann99 said:

 

If you want to use their "logic" (and I use that term extremely loosely), then the mortality rate of those who have had any vaccination is 100% over 120 years. Of course they won't admit that the mortality rate of those who have had no vaccinations of any sort in their life is also 100% but their 100% tends to come more quickly.

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:cray-cray:

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14 hours ago, Cartmann99 said:

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:cray-cray:

If Tyler Perry doesn't make this nonsense into a ridiculous, over the top movie, he's really missing a golden opportunity.  

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Blago must be jealous of all the other Branch Trumpvidians getting the press these days

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Former governor and convicted felon Rod Blagojevich on Monday told the ABC7 I-Team that Illinois' General Assembly violated his civil rights in removing him from office and then prohibiting him from any future run for elective office in the state.

Blagojevich was impeached and convicted in 2009 and now plans to ask that a federal jury hear his complaint that the proceedings and decisions were unconstitutional. If the ban on his holding statewide public office was to be lifted, it would open the door to another possible statewide run for the career politician.

The ex-governor, released from prison nearly a year and a half ago, has prepared a 10-page federal lawsuit. A draft copy has been obtained by the I-Team.

Blagojevich tells the I-Team that he will file a lawsuit against the state of Illinois, objecting to the way he was removed as governor and challenging the prohibition against his running for state elective office. He claims the methods used against him by the General Assembly violated his constitutional rights.

I figure he's attention starved and is doing this to get his ass back in the news.  I also think he might be doing this so he can pretend to be an attorney again by representing himself in court. 

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1 hour ago, 47of74 said:

I figure he's attention starved and is doing this to get his ass back in the news.  I also think he might be doing this so he can pretend to be an attorney again by representing himself in court. 

Does he possibly have a book coming out soon? Getting your name in the press before a book launch can help boost sales.

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2 minutes ago, Cartmann99 said:

Does he possibly have a book coming out soon? Getting your name in the press before a book launch can help boost sales.

Good point.  Hadn't thought of that.

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
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:confusion-shrug:

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This is a good op-ed from Paul Waldman: "How right-wing media and social isolation lead people to eat horse paste"

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“There is no such thing as society,” Margaret Thatcher famously said in 1987, insisting that we all had to take responsibility for our own fate. But something tells me that even Thatcher would be alarmed if she saw people so determined to isolate themselves from institutions, mutual responsibility and simple sanity that they wound up eating horse dewormer to cure themselves of a deadly disease for which there was a widely available vaccine.

The story of ivermectin — the horse paste in question — is about the omnipresent grifters who prey on the Republican masses. It’s about the merging of politics and media on the right, and how they can combine to nurture people’s worst instincts. And it’s about the atomization and alienation that conservative ideology can produce when confronted with a pandemic and taken to an absurd degree.

Ivermectin, of course, is the latest supposed miracle cure for covid-19 that people on the right have seized on as an excuse to not get vaccinated. I don’t need some vaccine that probably has a microchip in it so Bill Gates can track me! If I get sick, I’ll just take this stuff!

Last year it was hydroxychloroquine, and a month from now people may be drinking antifreeze. But now feed stores are overrun with people stocking up on horse dewormer, some of whom wind up frantically calling poison control after they overdose.

One might argue that people are idiots and always will be, so this kind of thing isn’t unexpected. But this is a conservative phenomenon, and one particular to this moment in history.

The first element that drives it forward is the unstoppable right-wing grift machine, which sees the Republican masses as gullible fools just waiting to be separated from their money. Every major development in politics or current events — the rise of Donald Trump, the tea party, the pandemic — produces a wave of opportunists who get rich (or richer) by hitting up those masses for “donations” to scam PACs, support for phony charities, or the sale of cheap memorabilia. GOP elites have long seen average Republicans as suckers and marks just waiting to be exploited.

The second element is the union of media and politics on the right that is now more entrenched than ever. Republican politicians move seamlessly into Fox News gigs, right-wing media personalities are featured performers at political rallies, and no one pretends that conservative media are much more than a propaganda apparatus for the Republican cause.

That union is responsible for an enormous amount of conservative resistance to coronavirus vaccines. Fox News hosts including Tucker Carlson, Sean Hannity and Laura Ingraham have acted as a kind of nightly clearinghouse of anti-vaccine propaganda; Republican politicians, knowing their most vocal and passionate constituents are watching those shows, parrot (or pander to) vaccine skepticism, and over time, vaccine resistance becomes a key part of Republican identity, a way to define who you are and, more importantly, whom you hate.

That’s where things really come together. It’s almost as though all the trends in conservative identity politics were built for making people resist vaccines and gravitate to quack cures, no matter how outlandish and distasteful (that’s meant literally; apparently the horse paste tastes absolutely disgusting).

The long-standing conservative inclination toward individualism and independence has in recent years grown into not just a skepticism toward institutions and systems of expertise but a burning hostility toward them. Conservatives have weaved a tale of their own noble martyrdom, in which every element of society is arrayed against them: government, corporations, pop culture, schools, the media, even democracy itself — all are supposedly opposed to their values and out to destroy them.

So the fact that government agencies, the scientific community and the mainstream media are all urging you to (1) take the vaccine, and (2) not eat horse paste only makes the horse paste more compelling.

After all, aren’t those the very people who fought against Trump, stole the 2020 election and want to turn America into a socialist dystopia? And the fact that liberals are gleefully mocking people for eating horse paste further convinces some that that’s exactly what they should do. If I have to poison myself to own the libs, it’s worth it.

All this is wrapped up in a narrative of individual rights (If I have to wear a mask in the supermarket, I’m not free!) and self-reliance, in which one’s disconnection from others becomes a source not of despair but of empowerment.

Conservatives are constantly telling each other to “do your research." That means almost the opposite of what it purports to say: It means ignore those with authority and credentials and instead dive into the sea of social media misinformation until you’ve heard enough lunatic conspiracy theories that you arrive at a whole other kind of “truth.”

The endpoint of “doing your research” isn’t the realization that coronavirus vaccines are a remarkably effective way to avoid dying; the endpoint is an embrace of QAnon-style conspiracy theories and a livestock dewormer appetizer. You’ve found a “truth” that is likely to further isolate you from your existing community — co-workers, friends, family — and substitute for it an online community of like-minded paranoiacs.

But you know who isn’t sucking down horse paste? Tucker Carlson and the rest of the multimillionaire Fox personalities. One local-market anti-vax right-wing radio host after another may be dying from covid, but that’s because they got high on their own supply. The folks running this show never forget that it’s a scam you feed the rubes — and the lonelier and more alienated the masses feel, the better.

 

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The Branch Trumpvidian who accosted an NBC reporter in Gulfport has a warrant for his arrest now. 

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The man who accosted an NBC reporter covering Hurricane Ida on Monday is now wanted for arrest.

The arrest warrants issued Tuesday charge Benjamin Eugene Dagley, from Ohio, with two counts of simple assault, one count of disturbance of the peace and one count of violation of emergency curfew.

The Gulfport Police Department has also contacted the Cuyahoga County Adult Probation Department in Ohio for a potential violation of probation. Dagley’s probation from a previous charge barred him from traveling. 

Dagley allegedly assaulted NBC News correspondent Shaquille Brewster during a live broadcast while he was covering Hurricane Ida. 

 

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A local Branch Trumpvidian thinks that cause he's a BT he can talk our rather useless rep into voting for the infrastructure bill.

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If you work hard in this country, you should be able to afford a good life. As a Trump supporter and lifelong Republican I’m calling on my congressperson Rep. Ashley Hinson to vote in support of infrastructure jobs and support for families. Congress is debating bills to do that right now, and people here in Iowa need them to become law.

We need good-paying jobs in Iowa. Small businesses and working people need support in order to survive. We also need to expand access to health care — a lot of people are stuck without insurance, and have to choose between seeing the doctor and paying rent. It shouldn’t be that way.

Representative Hinson, I know you don’t swing a hammer like me, but please vote to invest in the people who elected you.

I hope he's not holding his breath for Ashley to do so.  It would not surprise me in the least if she turns her back on him and refuses to vote for the bill just to stick it to the President.  Ashley and her fellow GQP members never want to do anything right by the American people.

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I have no doubt that the players here are BTs: "A hospital refused to give ivermectin to a covid patient. Then a judge ordered doctors to administer it."

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When her husband got so sick from the coronavirus that he was forced into a medically induced coma this month, Julie Smith turned to ivermectin — a deworming drug that some people are using to treat or prevent covid-19.

“My husband is on death’s doorstep,” she wrote, according to an affidavit. “He has no other options.”

Yet when Julie Smith got a prescription from an Ohio doctor, a hospital in West Chester Township, Ohio, allegedly refused to administer the drug to Jeffrey Smith while he was seriously ill and on a ventilator, according to a lawsuit she filed on behalf of her husband this month.

Now, the hospital is being forced to administer the unproven treatment to Jeffrey Smith, 51, after a judge ruled in Julie Smith’s favor.

On Aug. 23, Butler County Judge J. Gregory Howard ordered West Chester Hospital to treat Smith with ivermectin for three weeks, as requested by his wife. The judge made the decision even though the Food and Drug Administration has not approved ivermectin to treat or prevent covid-19 and has advised against that use amid spiking calls to poison centers after people took potent versions of the drug meant for livestock.

“West Chester Hospital shall immediately administer Ivermectin to Jeffrey Smith,” Howard wrote in his order, which was first reported by the Ohio Capital Journal and the Cincinnati Enquirer.

The Aug. 23 order, which does not explain the judge’s reasoning, says Smith shall be administered 30 milligrams of ivermectin daily for 21 days. Smith’s vaccination status is not mentioned in the lawsuit, and Jonathan Davidson, an attorney for Julie Smith, declined to comment to The Washington Post on whether the Ohio man has been vaccinated.

Davidson said Tuesday that Jeffrey Smith is alive but declined to share details of his client’s medical condition, citing the family’s privacy.

“We’re just waiting right now,” Davidson told The Post.

A spokeswoman for UC Health, which includes West Chester Hospital, said she cannot comment on litigation or the specifics of patient care because of privacy laws.

State and federal health agencies have expressed alarm at overdoses involving the deworming drug in recent weeks. The FDA, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health have warned for months against using the drug to treat the coronavirus, saying its use can “cause serious harm.” The Mississippi State Department of Health recently issued an alert advising people not to take the drug. It said that “at least 70 percent of the recent calls” to the state’s poison-control center have been from people ingesting ivermectin to treat or prevent covid-19.

A version of ivermectin approved for humans has long been used to fight parasitic infections, and some doctors have become vocal advocates of using the drug for covid, prescribing it routinely. A group of researchers who reviewed data from 14 ivermectin studies found that the results “cannot confirm the widely advertised benefits,” although other trials are ongoing.

The drug has found particular traction in conservative circles, promoted by talk-show hosts and Republican lawmakers.

Ohio reported nearly 6,000 new coronavirus infections on Tuesday, bringing the state’s seven-day average for new cases to 4,717, according to data compiled by The Post. More than 2,700 people are now hospitalized for covid in Ohio.

More than 48 percent of the state is fully vaccinated. Data from the Ohio Department of Health shows that only about 500 of the roughly 21,000 state residents who have been hospitalized with covid since Jan. 1 were vaccinated.

Jeffrey Smith, of Fairfield Township, Ohio, tested positive for the coronavirus on July 9 and was admitted to an intensive care unit six days later, according to the lawsuit filed in Butler County Common Pleas Court. The hospital, less than 30 miles outside Cincinnati, treated the father of three with its usual coronavirus protocol of remdesivir, plasma and steroids. Smith was experiencing “a period of relative stability” before his condition worsened July 27, according to the lawsuit, and he was sedated and placed on a ventilator days later.

After her husband was placed in a medically induced coma on Aug. 20, Julie Smith sought and was given a prescription of the drug by Fred Wagshul, an Ohio doctor who told the Capital Journal that the government’s stance toward ivermectin amounts to “genocide.”

Wagshul backed off the word choice in an interview with The Post but falsely claimed that ivermectin has proved more effective at warding off the coronavirus than the vaccines, although he said he also recommended immunization.

But when Smith asked doctors to administer the drug, the hospital refused to do so, telling her that ivermectin could interfere with other treatments and that there was nothing left for them to do, according to the lawsuit. Davidson acknowledged to The Post that the drug is “controversial” and said the hospital was “adamant.”

Among those who filed the lawsuit was Ralph Lorigo, the Erie County Conservative Party chairman who has sued successfully in Illinois and New York for similar orders to use ivermectin. Davidson said he believes Julie Smith read about Lorigo’s successful court actions, which resulted in her finding a physician in Wagshul who was willing to prescribe the drug. Attempts to reach Lorigo were unsuccessful.

The Front Line Covid-19 Critical Care Alliance, a nonprofit touting ivermectin as a preventive treatment for covid that lists Wagshul as a founding physician, is referenced in the Ohio lawsuit. The organization includes prices and locations of pharmacies that will supply the deworming drug, according to the Capital Journal.

As part of the complaint filed to the judge, Julie Smith signed a full release that relieved West Chester Hospital of any liability related to the ivermectin treatment. Davidson told The Post on Tuesday that Jeffrey Smith “hasn’t gotten any worse” eight days into his treatment.

Steve Feagins, chief clinical officer with Mercy Health in Cincinnati, told the WCPO television station that while he understands people’s desperation in looking for something that’s not a vaccine to help prevent or treat the virus, he called the decision to prescribe ivermectin to covid patients “a tough risk-to-benefit ratio.”

“Anything we give in a hospital, you have to know that has been pharmacy-vetted, approved, is the benefit exceeds the harm,” Feagins said. “But I could tell you, if something works and is approved and authorized, we will do it.”

 

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      This place is much nicer when there aren’t drunk douche nozzles trying to start WWIII with my sister. 

      Last time I was here I brought my sister. There was a drunk douche cannon holding court here. He and my sister took mutual exeception to each other. Well he first then my sister responded.
      We got out of there before he got even dumber since there’s another brewery across the street.  Drunk fucker didn’t follow us and I think some flashing lights a few minutes later were for him. 
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