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Moscow Mitch McConnell


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fraurosena

It's called democracy, Mitch... a complete anathema to you.

 

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Somebody needs to knock him in the head and explain that Scrooge pre-ghost visits was never meant to be an aspirational role model.  $600 is essentially one extra paycheck for many people. That's

This came across my FB feed.  I heard he hates the name - so I'm all for it!  

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Alisamer

It's becoming clearer and clearer that the Republicans who are in elected positions oppose anything that will threaten their power, regardless of the will of the people. What I don't get is the regular people who are Republicans, who go right along with them - without bothering to understand what and why they are supporting, and often against their own interests.

I keep seeing stuff in Republican ads "our opponent believes in government run health care!" and "Democrats will admit DC and Puerto Rico as states!" thrown about as scare tactics. I see them and my response is either "good!" or "OK, that's fine." If the people of DC and/or Puerto Rico want to be states, I say let them. Wasn't "no taxation without representation" part of the whole point of the founding of the US? Let them have equal representation.

Is there a good, non-racist, non-partisan, humane reason NOT to admit DC and Puerto Rico as states? I'm genuinely asking, because this is an issue I'm not well educated on just yet. 

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GreyhoundFan
1 hour ago, Alisamer said:

Is there a good, non-racist, non-partisan, humane reason NOT to admit DC and Puerto Rico as states? I'm genuinely asking, because this is an issue I'm not well educated on just yet. 

No, there's no good reason. It's simply the fear of people of color having as much say as places like Wyoming, Idaho, and North Dakota.

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Audrey2
3 hours ago, Alisamer said:

It's becoming clearer and clearer that the Republicans who are in elected positions oppose anything that will threaten their power, regardless of the will of the people. What I don't get is the regular people who are Republicans, who go right along with them - without bothering to understand what and why they are supporting, and often against their own interests.

I keep seeing stuff in Republican ads "our opponent believes in government run health care!" and "Democrats will admit DC and Puerto Rico as states!" thrown about as scare tactics. I see them and my response is either "good!" or "OK, that's fine." If the people of DC and/or Puerto Rico want to be states, I say let them. Wasn't "no taxation without representation" part of the whole point of the founding of the US? Let them have equal representation.

As horrified as I am, I'm not entirely surprised. Many states had a Republican takeover in their state, which started to affect the US House and, unfortunately, they're taking over everything.

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SassyPants

Yesterday we drove through KY, and south of Bowling Green and north of the TN border there’s a big billboard that says America Needs Trump and McConnell in 2020. My husband just about wrecked the motor home. 

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On 9/19/2020 at 4:32 PM, GreyhoundFan said:

If I knew MoscowMitch had polio, I had forgotten it.  It must have paralyzed his heart instead of his legs, since he cares not one whit about fellow human beings:

 

Politofact says this is false. His treatment for polio was not publicly funded. He is still a disgusting slimy weasel.

https://www.politifact.com/factchecks/2019/apr/29/facebook-posts/no-mitch-mcconnell-was-not-cured-polio-child-becau/

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fraurosena

I hate to disagree with Ted here, but I don't believe McConnell is disagreeing with Trump's covid response so much as he is looking out for his own hide.

 

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GreyhoundFan

"Mitch McConnell is laughing at all of us"

Spoiler

We are living through the greatest economic crisis since the Great Depression. Millions upon millions of Americans are jobless. Industries ranging from restaurants to entertainment are warning they will go out of business en masse without immediate and substantial government aid.

Mass layoffs continue to be announced, and more are expected. The desperation of the unemployed, now going without the federal supplement that made skimpy state unemployment benefits livable, is growing. Last week, the head of a food bank in Alabama told PBS that his organization couldn’t keep up with the demand.

And Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) is laughing at our nation’s suffering.

The laughter came Monday night, during a debate between McConnell and Amy McGrath, his Democratic challenger for Senate. McGrath castigated McConnell for his lack of action on further economic stimulus and relief for the millions of Americans suffering the economic consequences of the coronavirus pandemic.

When McConnell pointed out he had helped pass the first rounds of relief in the spring, and suggested the lack of action was the fault of the Democrats who wanted to spend money on things unrelated to the crisis, McGrath came out swinging.

“The House passed a bill in May and the Senate went on vacation. I mean, you just don’t do that. You negotiate. Senator, it is a national crisis.”

And McConnell laughed.

He continued to chuckle as McGrath went on: “If you want to call yourself a leader, you’ve got to get things done.”

Perhaps McGrath should have used the word “recess” to describe more precisely the Senate’s week-long break. But otherwise she got this one exactly right.

Most Americans think we need to do more to help people struggling as a result of the pandemic and the economic pain of lockdowns, shutdowns and social distancing mandates. And when I say “most,” I mean a large majority. Poll after poll shows Americans favor extending the $600-a-week unemployment supplement that was allowed to expire by the inaction of Senate Republicans.

But as long as Republicans continue to control the Senate, it’s unlikely Americans will receive significant help.

McConnell’s response to the economic catastrophe that has resulted from the pandemic is full-on contempt for the suffering and needy. Republicans’ proposed aid packages have been ridiculously inadequate, with the result Democrats will not back them. On Tuesday, after the debate, McConnell once again proposed a “skinny” stimulus, one targeted at small-business owners, that would also offer some unemployment assistance.

This is not serious. Our economic need is not “skinny,” but large and ever-growing. That’s why House Democrats passed a $3 trillion aid package in May. Even President Trump knows it — on Tuesday he tweeted, “STIMULUS! Go big or go home!!!” (What was that again about McConnell saying he would back a large bill on pandemic relief if only Trump was behind it?)

But these pretend attempts at action pay off for McConnell in one important way. A majority of Americans believe both parties should share blame for the impasse. They believe it is the fault of both parties that people cannot receive the help they so desperately need.

McConnell’s laugh gives lie to that belief, demonstrating the heartlessness and cruelty at the heart of the Republican project. It’s been a 40-year effort by the Republican Party to tear down the scaffolding of the New Deal and return us to a meaner, nastier world where individual citizens are left to fend for ourselves, even as the wealthiest Americans and largest businesses receive tax breaks and regulatory relief that leave us all poorer.

Americans don’t want the Republican agenda. They want to see the Affordable Care Act expanded, not overturned. They want to see an increase in Social Security benefits, not means-testing. They want increased taxes on the wealthy, not further tax cuts for the one percent.

And just to be clear: Republicans have passed up chance after chance to deliver more pandemic aid. They resisted it from the very beginning — even hours before passing the package with the unemployment supplement in March, a number of Republicans were publicly whining it was too generous. Many have repeatedly claimed that unemployment benefits are keeping Americans out of the workforce, instead of the fact that if you are, say, a waiter or hotel housekeeper, jobs are not exactly plentiful at the moment.

And now McConnell is so confident that his plans will succeed, he couldn’t even be bothered to fake empathy onstage for a few hours on Monday night. His knowing laugh makes it clear what a continued Republican majority in the Senate means: that Americans will continue to get treated with contempt by politicians who claim to be acting on their behalf.

What a bad joke.

 

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SassyPants
53 minutes ago, GreyhoundFan said:

"Mitch McConnell is laughing at all of us"

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We are living through the greatest economic crisis since the Great Depression. Millions upon millions of Americans are jobless. Industries ranging from restaurants to entertainment are warning they will go out of business en masse without immediate and substantial government aid.

Mass layoffs continue to be announced, and more are expected. The desperation of the unemployed, now going without the federal supplement that made skimpy state unemployment benefits livable, is growing. Last week, the head of a food bank in Alabama told PBS that his organization couldn’t keep up with the demand.

And Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) is laughing at our nation’s suffering.

The laughter came Monday night, during a debate between McConnell and Amy McGrath, his Democratic challenger for Senate. McGrath castigated McConnell for his lack of action on further economic stimulus and relief for the millions of Americans suffering the economic consequences of the coronavirus pandemic.

When McConnell pointed out he had helped pass the first rounds of relief in the spring, and suggested the lack of action was the fault of the Democrats who wanted to spend money on things unrelated to the crisis, McGrath came out swinging.

“The House passed a bill in May and the Senate went on vacation. I mean, you just don’t do that. You negotiate. Senator, it is a national crisis.”

And McConnell laughed.

He continued to chuckle as McGrath went on: “If you want to call yourself a leader, you’ve got to get things done.”

Perhaps McGrath should have used the word “recess” to describe more precisely the Senate’s week-long break. But otherwise she got this one exactly right.

Most Americans think we need to do more to help people struggling as a result of the pandemic and the economic pain of lockdowns, shutdowns and social distancing mandates. And when I say “most,” I mean a large majority. Poll after poll shows Americans favor extending the $600-a-week unemployment supplement that was allowed to expire by the inaction of Senate Republicans.

But as long as Republicans continue to control the Senate, it’s unlikely Americans will receive significant help.

McConnell’s response to the economic catastrophe that has resulted from the pandemic is full-on contempt for the suffering and needy. Republicans’ proposed aid packages have been ridiculously inadequate, with the result Democrats will not back them. On Tuesday, after the debate, McConnell once again proposed a “skinny” stimulus, one targeted at small-business owners, that would also offer some unemployment assistance.

This is not serious. Our economic need is not “skinny,” but large and ever-growing. That’s why House Democrats passed a $3 trillion aid package in May. Even President Trump knows it — on Tuesday he tweeted, “STIMULUS! Go big or go home!!!” (What was that again about McConnell saying he would back a large bill on pandemic relief if only Trump was behind it?)

But these pretend attempts at action pay off for McConnell in one important way. A majority of Americans believe both parties should share blame for the impasse. They believe it is the fault of both parties that people cannot receive the help they so desperately need.

McConnell’s laugh gives lie to that belief, demonstrating the heartlessness and cruelty at the heart of the Republican project. It’s been a 40-year effort by the Republican Party to tear down the scaffolding of the New Deal and return us to a meaner, nastier world where individual citizens are left to fend for ourselves, even as the wealthiest Americans and largest businesses receive tax breaks and regulatory relief that leave us all poorer.

Americans don’t want the Republican agenda. They want to see the Affordable Care Act expanded, not overturned. They want to see an increase in Social Security benefits, not means-testing. They want increased taxes on the wealthy, not further tax cuts for the one percent.

And just to be clear: Republicans have passed up chance after chance to deliver more pandemic aid. They resisted it from the very beginning — even hours before passing the package with the unemployment supplement in March, a number of Republicans were publicly whining it was too generous. Many have repeatedly claimed that unemployment benefits are keeping Americans out of the workforce, instead of the fact that if you are, say, a waiter or hotel housekeeper, jobs are not exactly plentiful at the moment.

And now McConnell is so confident that his plans will succeed, he couldn’t even be bothered to fake empathy onstage for a few hours on Monday night. His knowing laugh makes it clear what a continued Republican majority in the Senate means: that Americans will continue to get treated with contempt by politicians who claim to be acting on their behalf.

What a bad joke.

 

And yet the good folks of KY will vote him right back in. It is the very notion of insanity-

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RosyDaisy

Keep in mind that states in the Bible Belt like Kentucky vote based on 3 issues:  anti-abortion, pro-gun, and anti-LGBT.  They don't care about anything else.  As long as McConnell supports those issues, the majority of people in Kentucky will keep voting for him even though it's not in their best interests.

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GreyhoundFan

A good one from Dana Milbank: "McConnell helps ‘working families’ by killing coronavirus relief. That’s rich, Mitch."

Quote

The Trump administration and House Democratic leaders are in striking range of a deal to send $1,200 stimulus checks to American families and to pump $2 trillion into the flagging economy.

But Rich Mitch is having none of it.

As The Post reported, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.) — anti-Trump Republicans have taken to calling him “Rich Mitch” because of his $34 million net worth — told Republican colleagues Tuesday that he had warned the White House not to strike an agreement with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) on a coronavirus relief package before the Nov. 3 election.

Who cares if tens of millions of Americans are in increasingly desperate straits? Even if negotiators reach agreement despite McConnell’s sabotage, he refused to commit to voting on it before the election.

Then, on Wednesday, McConnell had the chutzpah to stand on the Senate floor and claim he was looking out for the little guy. “Maybe coastal elites who can practically find a million dollars in their couch cushions are indifferent about whether we get an outcome here,” he said, alleging that “blue-state billionaires” are Democrats’ top priority — not “working families like the Kentuckians I represent.”

McConnell had just blocked $1,200 checks for working families. He had blocked expanded food stamps for the hungry. He had blocked protections for those in danger of losing their homes. He had blocked funds that would avoid another round of job losses in states and municipalities. Instead of a $2 trillion relief package that enjoys the support of more than 7 in 10 Americans, he offered a previously rejected plan with a quarter of the relief and a corporate liability shield so working people won’t be made whole if an employer’s recklessness makes them sick.

Yet McConnell claims he’s fighting elites to “get an outcome” for working families. What outcome? Bankruptcy?

It’s a timely reminder, a dozen days before Election Day, that removing President Trump won’t repair dysfunction in Washington as long as McConnell remains in charge of the Senate.

The apparent absence of any principle but power in McConnell, and his ability to propound rank dishonesty with perfect piety, should have lost the ability to shock by now. He righteously insisted that no Supreme Court nominee be considered eight months before an election and now plans to ram through a Supreme Court confirmation eight DAYS before an election. He successfully fought bipartisan efforts to protect the election now underway from Russian interference.

Yet this one is particularly cruel. We’re in the most unequal recovery in modern history, with low-income families and racial minorities suffering disproportionately, and McConnell is blocking a rescue while blaming others.

He has been politically unwise; had he allowed a vote on the $3 trillion relief package that passed the House in May, that stimulus would now be buoying the economy, to Trump’s, and Republicans’, benefit. (At the time, McConnell said he hadn’t “felt the urgency” of immediate action.)

He has been inconsistent; after allowing a $7 trillion increase in the debt under Trump, much of it in gifts to the wealthy, he has found deficit religion now that ordinary people need more help as they face the pandemic’s second wave.

He’s being reckless with the human cost of his actions; Federal Reserve Chair Jerome H. Powell has said that too little stimulus “would lead to a weak recovery, creating unnecessary hardship for households and businesses” — a warning echoed with growing alarm by other Fed officials and economists in recent days.

And McConnell’s being cynical. He told Republican colleagues he didn’t want a coronavirus relief deal before the election so he could keep the focus on the Supreme Court confirmation. He also wants to avoid a vote on a major relief bill that would split Republicans.

So on Wednesday he served up the same fig-leaf relief bill he offered last month, and it met with the same party-line failure — but not before the majority leader performed one more Orwellian chef-d’oeuvre.

Claiming Democrats should support his bill because it contains (small) quantities of relief programs they like, McConnell said: “It turns out there’s a special perk to being a United States senator. When you actually support something, you get to vote for it.” He repeated the line for emphasis.

That is some world-class cant. McConnell has refused for five months to allow a vote on the House-passed, $3 trillion relief bill. He won’t commit to a pre-election vote on a $2 trillion compromise he’s trying to kill. And yet he stands on the Senate floor, chin in chest, sneer on lips, and says, “When you actually support something, you get to vote for it”?

That’s rich, Mitch.

 

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Audrey2
1 hour ago, WiseGirl said:

What's going on?

Screenshot_20201021-220433_Facebook.jpg

Maybe with all of his deals with the devil, the devil is starting to collect his due.

It could also be that Trump's goons roughed him up.

Edited by Audrey2
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GreyhoundFan

I have no words to describe how much I despise this slug. "McConnell’s intriguing comment about the GOP and ‘the next election’"

Quote

While most Americans were wrapping up their weekend on Sunday, the Senate was debating something on which the ultimate conclusion is all but certain: Amy Coney Barrett’s confirmation to the Supreme Court.

But sometimes in the course of debating foregone things, word choices can be notable. And one particular line from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has raised some eyebrows.

At the end of his remarks, McConnell did what he often does: spike the football on his political gamesmanship. McConnell has spent the better part of the last four years rubbing Democrats’ noses in how the battle for the judiciary has played out — all of it stemming from his blockades of Merrick Garland’s Supreme Court nomination and other Barack Obama court picks. So, of course, McConnell was going to spend some time doing that Sunday.

The comments, though, could also be read to point to an impending GOP loss.

“This is something to really be proud of and feel good about,” McConnell said of Barrett’s confirmation. “We made an important contribution to the future of this country. A lot of what we have done over the last four years will be undone sooner or later by the next election. It won’t be able to do much about this for a long time to come.”

What McConnell said about the staying power of Barrett’s confirmation is unquestionably true. Senate Republicans will soon have filled three vacancies to the Supreme Court in President Trump’s first term, tiling it in a clear 6-to-3 conservative direction. Given how long justices serve and how unpredictable the timing and frequency of vacancies can be, it could indeed take many years or even decades for Democrats to undo that.

But what about the other thing McConnell said — that the GOP’s accomplishments will in many other cases “be undone sooner or later by the next election.” It’s one thing to say that it would take a long time for Democrats’ to claw back; it’s another to suggest that effort “will be” commencing after “the next election.” That, after all, would require Democrats to have the power to do so, which they would get only by winning the presidency and/or the Senate. Some have cast McConnell’s comments as waving a white flag in the 2020 election.

Another read on the comments is also plausible, though. Perhaps McConnell is simply referring to the “next election” in broader terms, rather than specifically 2020. He might have meant Democrats will need to keep winning the next election — whether in 2020, 2022, 2024, etc. — to claw their way back. Politics is somewhat cyclical, which means Democrats are probably due for a return to power at some point in the near future.

McConnell’s office noted that the Senate majority leader has often made a similar point — that whatever the makeup of Washington in the near future, the more than 200 judicial nominees confirmed under Trump will be his lasting legacy.

When McConnell signaled in May 2019 that he would fill a Supreme Court vacancy if it arose in 2020, for instance, he said: “You want to have a long, lasting positive impact on the country. Everything else changes. … What can’t be undone is a lifetime appointment to a young man or woman who believes in the quaint notion that the job of a judge is to follow the law.”

But McConnell’s choice of words is difficult to completely divorce from the significant deficit Trump now faces. And it’s arguably not the only sign that McConnell might believe his party is in line for a loss, whether in the presidential race and/or in the Senate (which is more of an open question).

He has stood strongly against the White House’s proposals for a big coronavirus relief bill, for instance, despite the White House’s apparent anxiety to get a deal done before the election. This might reflect legitimate concerns in his conference about the size of the relief package, but you would think Senate Republicans might try harder to do what they could to salvage the presidency — if they believed it was salvageable.

McConnell has also distanced himself somewhat from the coronavirus response that has so dogged the White House. He said recently, for example, that he has declined to visit the White House because “my impression was that their approach to how to handle this is different from mine and what I suggested that we do in the Senate, which is to wear a mask and practice social distancing.”

McConnell is an exceedingly strategic politician, almost always thinking multiple steps ahead and choosing his words carefully. Maybe his Sunday comments were just a wayward choice of phrasing. Either way, McConnell’s comments sound a lot like those of a man who would like to help pre-write the post-mortems of a GOP loss before the election is over.

 

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GreyhoundFan

Please, Rufus, let Loeffler and Perdue be defeated in the GA senate run-off so MoscowMitch won't have unfettered power.

"How Mitch McConnell might quietly make it easier to cripple Biden’s presidency"

Quote

The talks over the $908 billion stimulus package have hit a rough patch, because Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) is insisting that it must contain liability protections for businesses. The Senate Majority Leader also wants far less in spending — around $500 billion — but his most ardent wish is to protect companies from lawsuits by workers and consumers who are infected by coronavirus.

Which hints at a way that McConnell could end up using these talks to make it easier for himself to cripple Joe Biden’s presidency later.

Democrats fear a scenario that runs as follows: If McConnell can emerge from these talks having secured liability protections that last long enough, then there will be nothing more he really wants from any future stimulus package.

This in turn, could deprive Democrats of leverage against him to get more next year in economic assistance for state and local governments, for the unemployed, for small businesses, for, well, anyone. If McConnell gets his way now, it could be easier for him to cripple the Biden presidency with austerity later.

And amid a downturn next year, an outcome like this would make the recovery more miserable – leading to terrible humanitarian consequences, while simultaneously saddling Biden with the politics it would entail.

“Anybody who knows how Mitch McConnell works can see this coming from a mile away,” Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) told me in an interview.

“He’d like to get liability protection for his political supporters," Wyden added. "Then, after Jan. 5th, when McConnell gets most of what he wants on liability, he’ll have no incentive to provide any more economic relief for the American people.”

“Then he’s going to resist what we’ll try to do to help people in January,” Wyden continued.

This will allow McConnell to put into practice the “same economic sabotage playbook he used from 2009 to 2016,” Wyden said, in a reference to the Republican effort to cripple the recovery under former President Barack Obama through austerity and withholding all cooperation.

McConnell and other Republicans have proposed a liability shield that lasts for five years. But Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah), a key driver of the $908 billion proposal, has suggested a much shorter time-frame in hopes of finding a compromise, and other senators are in talks in hopes of finding one as well.

But Wyden noted that if McConnell can secure liability protections for, say, a year or two as opposed to five, this could still serve his broader purpose. He’ll have no need to make concessions on another stimulus package for that length of time, since he’s gotten what he apparently wants more than anything else.

“McConnell has focused for months and months on one thing — liability protections for his supporters,” Wyden told me.

Democrats oppose these protections on the grounds that they could put workers in an even more precarious position amid the pandemic, especially as Trump’s federal government is both overly reluctant to issue strict enough coronavirus workplace guidelines and is pulling back from workplace safety enforcement.

McConnell tossed out another surprise on Tuesday afternoon, suggesting that the Senate forget about both liability protections and aid to state and local governments for now, and compromise on other fronts.

The $908 billion compromise includes aid to state and local governments (McConnell opposes them) and Democrats would be loath to see those tossed, since that could cripple the recovery further (which perhaps explains McConnell’s opposition).

But all this new move really shows is how McConnell is determined to leverage those liability protections above all else: By tying them to the fate of aid to state governments, he essentially seems to be saying that if Democrats want the latter, they’ll need to accept the former.

What’s galling about all this is that millions of people are now facing serious hardship because previous congressional aid programs are on the verge of ending. Still Republicans are insisting that this debate unfold in a place where the choice is between a too-stingy aid package and a much-too-stingy one.

Indeed, even the White House is now privately pushing for the rescue package to include direct stimulus checks of $600 to individuals, as The Post reports. (The package lacks any such payments). But as it is, that’s only half the $1,200 payments that Republicans themselves agreed to last spring.

Since then, McConnell has opposed such payments for months, even as President Trump has done little more than lurch back and forth between seeming to support them and then losing interest. And there’s no sign Trump will prevail on McConnell here at any rate.

Meanwhile, the current compromise proposal includes only $300 per week in additional unemployment assistance, and it’s unclear how long that would even last.

This is why Wyden and other Democrats have introduced legislation that would increase the unemployment assistance payment to $600, and have it run longer term, tied to the unemployment rate. But there’s no chance McConnell will accept having assistance tied to actual economic conditions on the ground, since that would frustrate his sabotage effort.

 

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GreyhoundFan

I wish some aide would put crazy glue on Mitch's coffee cup so we wouldn't have to listen to his crap anymore.

image.png.c7dd30f752af0588a0c1ec7c0e2e1d6d.png

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Cartmann99

 

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front hugs > duggs

Well, Charlie Kirk. TYPICALLY people don't embarrass themselves by spouting absolute bullsh!t and continue to show their face in public. 

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fraurosena

He is absolutely evil. Georgia, it’s up to you to stop him.

 

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Alisamer
On 12/26/2020 at 2:49 AM, fraurosena said:

He is absolutely evil. Georgia, it’s up to you to stop him.

 

Nice to have verbal confirmation, but this has been the Republican policy at least since Obama was elected. They spent literally the entire 8 years stomping their feet and saying "NUH-UH!" to everything any democrat proposed like toddlers resisting nap time, and now Trump has spent the past 4 years doing his level best to eliminate everything Obama actually got done. Even, in some cases, replacing it with nearly the exact same thing, just with a different name and his own signature on it.

Pure evil. No compassion, no sense, no care for anyone but themselves. 

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GreyhoundFan

Fuck you Mitch: "McConnell blocks Senate Democrats’ initial attempt to approve $2,000 stimulus checks amid growing pressure on GOP leader to act"

Quote

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.) on Tuesday blocked consideration of a House bill that would deliver a $2,000 stimulus payments to most Americans — spurning a request made by President Trump even as more Senate Republicans voiced support for the dramatically larger checks.

McConnell’s move was just the beginning of a saga that is likely to engulf the Senate for the rest of the week. Democrats are pushing for an up-or-down vote on the House bill, while more Republicans acknowledge a need for larger stimulus checks.

Those included calls from Georgia’s two embattled Republican senators — David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler — who find themselves in the midst of a tough re-election battle that will decide the fate of the chamber next week. GOP Sen. Deb Fischer of Nebraska also lent support Tuesday, declaring that “people are hurting and we need to get them more aid.”

McConnell instead took note of Trump’s Sunday statement that called for not only larger checks, but also new curbs on large tech companies and an investigations into the November election — and suggested they would be dealt with in tandem.

“Those are the three important subjects the President has linked together,” he said. “This week the Senate will begin a process to bring these three priorities into focus.”

The shifting Senate winds come a day after the House passed a bill to plus up stimulus checks with a bipartisan 275-134 vote. That proposal, called the CASH Act, aims to boost the $600 payments authorized in the massive year-end spending-and-relief package that Trump signed Sunday by another $1,400.

After McConnell spoke Tuesday, Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) then made a request to take up the House-passed bill.

“There’s a major difference in saying you support $2,000 checks and fighting to put them into law,” he said. “The House bill is the only way the only way to deliver these stimulus checks before the end of session. Will Senate Republicans stand against the House of Representatives, the Democratic majority in the Senate, and the president of their own party to prevent these $2,000 checks from going out the door?”

McConnell objected without further comment.

The debate has created strange political bedfellows, aligning Trump with his Democratic foes in Congress, who have sought larger stimulus payments for months amid signs that the economy has worsened.

The Georgia senators joined Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), who endorsed the idea on Monday, and Sen. Josh Hawley (R-Mo.), one of its earliest proponents.

“Absolutely, we need to get relief to Americans now, and I will support that,” Loeffler said on Fox News. Perdue, meanwhile, tweeted hours later he backs “this push for $2,000 in direct relief for the American people.”

The new wave of Republican support left Hawley convinced hours later that the Senate has “got the votes” to advance the proposal, adding in a tweet: “Let’s vote today.”

Emboldened politically, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) also issued his own ultimatum on Monday, threatening to hold up the chamber unless lawmakers are able to vote on the heightened stimulus payments.

The addition of new Republican support only further intensified the political pressure on McConnell, who now must navigate a path that addresses the president’s concerns without exposing his party to political attacks one week before a pair of Georgia special elections that will determine the Senate majority.

The comments from Loeffler and Perdue came as Sanders’s demand for a vote on the House’s $2,000 checks bill raised the prospect that the two senators would have to to spend several unexpected days in Washington amid the closing week of their re-election campaigns.

Trump also weighed in Tuesday morning: “Give the people $2000, not $600. They have suffered enough!” he wrote in a tweet that shared news of Sanders’s ultimatum.

Sanders’s threat scrambled a tight timeline for the final days of the current Congress, which will end on Sunday when the new class of lawmakers is sworn in. Besides the drama over Trump’s late demands, the Senate must also weigh in on Trump’s pending veto of the annual Pentagon policy bill.

The House voted overwhelmingly to override the veto Monday, setting up action in the Senate. An informal plan of holding the vote on Wednesday and sending senators home until the Jan. 3 swearing-in could very well be threatened by the checks drama: Sanders is threatening to withhold his consent for an earlier vote on the veto unless McConnell allows a vote on the larger checks — meaning a final vote on the override could be pushed to Friday.

“Let me be clear: If Senator McConnell doesn’t agree to an up or down vote to provide the working people of our country a $2,000 direct payment, Congress will not be going home for New Year’s Eve,” Sanders said in a statement late Monday. “Let’s do our job.”

Acceding to Sanders is not an easy choice for the majority leader: The larger checks have only scant support among Senate Republicans, who insisted for months than any pandemic relief measure following on the March Cares Act cost taxpayers no more than $1 trillion.

Adding $2,000 checks to the roughly $900 billion package that Trump signed Sunday would add $464 billion to the cost of the legislation — a staggeringly high price tag for many Republicans who have spent years fretting publicly about a growing national debt.

Both Loeffler and Perdue have taken public credit in their campaigns for delivering the $600 checks in the signed bill. But they have not weighed in on the $2,000 checks, while their Democratic opponents — Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff, respectively — have both enthusiastically embraced the larger amounts.

There are significant pockets of support for larger checks inside the GOP: Hawley was an early and aggressive support of direct stimulus checks, pushing with Sanders for $1,200 checks at a time when most Republicans preferred to see smaller payments or no checks at all. And Rubio lent support to the larger checks on Monday.

“I agree with the President that millions of working class families are in dire need of additional relief, which is why I support $2,000 in direct payments to Americans struggling due to the pandemic,” Rubio said in a statement, adding: “I share many of my colleagues’ concern about the long-term effects of additional spending, but we cannot ignore the fact that millions of working class families across the nation are still in dire need of relief.”

Trump’s demands are not limited to larger checks. In a Sunday statement released after he signed the massive stimulus bill, Trump said the Senate would “start the process for a vote that increases checks to $2,000, repeals Section 230, and starts an investigation into voter fraud.”

“Section 230” is a reference to a 1996 federal law that broadly indemnifies tech platforms such as Facebook, Twitter and Google for the actions of their users. Trump has railed against the tech companies as they have started to crack down on his unfounded postings alleging voter fraud in the November election, as well as much more aggressive actions targeting postings made by his supporters containing threats and disinformation.

Sen. Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.), who worked to convince Trump to sign the relief bill, said in an interview Monday that there would be a vote on the checks and on the law governing tech companies, but he did not know if those votes would be held before the current Congress adjourns.

He predicted that if there was a stand-alone vote on the $2,000 checks, it would pass the Senate with the necessary 60 votes.

“What drove [Trump’s] thinking was, I’m not going to give in until I get a vote on the checks in the Senate, and I’m not going to sign this bill until we finally address section 230,” he said. “I don’t know how Mitch is going to do it.”

 

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McConnell is apparently going to poison pill the bill with something the Dems will have to refuse. 

This is all the shits. I'm sure Trump is still golfing. 

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