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HerNameIsBuffy

John David & Abbie 8: Schrodinger No More, Baby Passenger Onboard

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JustEnough
3 hours ago, SportsgalAnnie said:

In all seriousness I live in TN we have been known to have all four seasons in a day.

 

1 hour ago, rainbowbabycakes said:

Texas too, lol

 

Hell, I'm way further north than you (Ontario, Canada) and we've had all season weather in a day.

Weather is weird, y'all. 🤯

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JustEnough
5 hours ago, BachelorToTheRapture said:

Although astronomical winter starts dec 21, meteorological seasons are different. December-February winter, March-May spring, June-August summer, and September-November fall. This is based on the climate and gives meteorologists (also scientists) specific timelines for collecting data. Of course, ours also collect seasonal data such as snowfall for 2018-2019 that goes from October-April this year. IMO meteorological seasons make more sense to most people as they're based on the climate rather than the length of days.

I actually didn't know that this was a thing so thank you for posting it. I've always just been taught/known about seasons switching on the solstice/equinox.

Even knowing that my brain always wants to make it switch on the 1st of Dec/Mar/Jun/Sep and always felt wrong 😅 

My kids all know the same as I was taught and one of my small humans is especially literal and if I ever mix up my brain vs the actual science that I was taught, I get corrected posthaste.  Especially since that particular small human has a birthday that falls before the autumn equinox but within September and it's very important to him that I not forget his birthday is in Summer, definitely not Autumn/Fall lol

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jjmennonite
5 hours ago, TeaGrannie said:

Are you from Alberta too? I saw the pictures of the snow today. 

Apparently Alberta doesn’t participate in scheduled seasons, lol. 

Yes, Alberta. If you don’t like the weather, just stay a while. I know they say that other places too, and furthermore, I don’t like this weather, and I have been staying, and I still don’t like it. 

I was in Nicaragua last May they are most definitely in the Northern hemisphere. When the rains started, they said winter had arrived. . . in May, in the Northern hemisphere. Obviously it makes sense, because it got colder, but it hurt my geeky brain to accept that. (They also use chicken-bus to describe the cheaper buses, in the middle of a Spanish sentence, by a non-English speaker. My geek brain found that adorable). 

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LacyMay
53 minutes ago, jjmennonite said:

Yes, Alberta. If you don’t like the weather, just stay a while. I know they say that other places too, and furthermore, I don’t like this weather, and I have been staying, and I still don’t like it. 

Fellow Albertan here. I feel where you're coming from. 

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Irishy

No defined seasons here in Ireland thanks to the Gulf Stream. You might get the same temps and conditions on Christmas Day as June 1st. Mild, damp and grey. The only way we know it’s summer is that it’s light 19 hours a day (today!) and miserable darkness by 4pm in winter. This summer is not going well so far. Haven’t shown off my beautiful coral shellac pedicure yet.

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Depressed
tabitha2
Posted (edited)

On the Topic I would like to recommend a fascinating  book I have read several times. 

 

https://www.amazon.com/East-Wind-Melts-Ice-Serenity/dp/0099506947/ref=mp_s_a_1_2?keywords=east+wind+melts+the+ice&qid=1561120060&s=gateway&sprefix=east+wind+melts&sr=8-2

 

If you prefer the Audible version has a lovely narrator that fits the mood of the book perfectly.   

 

Edited by tabitha2

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Blue jay
4 hours ago, Someone Out There said:

Apparently the Indigenous people of Australia with their various countries (~250) defined 2 to 7 seasons with the most common being 6.  An interesting article on seasons in Australia can be found here: https://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/ockhamsrazor/sprinter-and-sprummer/5705564.

Thanks for this! Marking seasonal passage is very linked to culture. Linking seasons to amounts of light (as per @VelociRapture) is one way and makes sense in a culture where hours of light fluctuate significantly and it is meaningful - like in Northern Europe for example. But this is not the only way to mark the concept of seasons and in other parts of the world, like near the equator where hours of light are less meaningful, other systems of natural cycles make be more relevant. It can just as easily be marked by other seasonal benchmarks like frost dates, flora or fauna habits etc. these may be more culturally meaningful in other areas. Unfortunately, colonialism means we have exported the culturally meaningful definitions of one region and insisted every culture and location around the world should take note. 

Facts are facts - but they aren’t. I don’t know the (factual!) indigenous ways of marking seasons in the area of Canada that I live. And there is a good reason why. Colonialism has disappeared this factual knowledge and replaced it with it’s own. Defining facts is a privilege, and if we think we know THE facts, we should probably ask whose knowledge is also being erased or deemed irrelevant. Because that is exactly what Trump is doing - deeming other people’s knowledge irrelevant.

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medimus
On 6/21/2019 at 11:18 AM, Irishy said:

No defined seasons here in Ireland thanks to the Gulf Stream. You might get the same temps and conditions on Christmas Day as June 1st. Mild, damp and grey. The only way we know it’s summer is that it’s light 19 hours a day (today!) and miserable darkness by 4pm in winter. This summer is not going well so far. Haven’t shown off my beautiful coral shellac pedicure yet.

I found it very interesting when living in Ireland that seasons are often referred to as per the celtic calendar, according to length of day. Now living as far North as it is possible to live and still be technically in the UK, where the weather is pretty much the same all year around give or take a few degrees and storms, it does make sense. 

So lots of nature books I borrowed in the library in Ireland had seasons:

-Spring from saint Bridget's day (first of Feb) till Bealtaine (first of May), with the middle being the Spring equinox

-Summer from Bealtaine till Lunasa (beginning of August), middle is the summer solstice/Midsummer which was yesterday and absolutely beautiful here

-Autumn from Lúnasa till oíche Shamhna (Halloween/31st of October), with the autumn equinox in the middle and

-Winter from Oíche Shamhna till saint Bridget's day again, with Midwinter/winter solstice in the middle

 

I had never heard of this before. I was taught the equinox to solstice to equinox to solstice system and I always used to find it vaguely annoying when people got it wrong and said things like 'it's summer' in May. But I quite like the above system, as it does make sense, just using different parameters to the other one. Though I find August as autumn the hardest to get my head around, though the words for September and October literally mean mid harvest and end of harvest in Irish, so the I suppose August as beginning of harvest does make sense.

Oh dear, that was a long ramble.

 

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Wine time!
OyToTheVey

I define seasons a bit differently. For me it's: Boob Sweat, This is Kinda Nice, Hockey, and Holyshit I'm Dying from Allergies.

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SorenaJ

Seasons in the UK are kinda cool, meh, kinda warm, meh. 

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WiseGirl
2 hours ago, medimus said:

Spring from saint Bridget's day (first of Feb) till Bealtaine (first of May), with the middle being the Spring equinox

-Summer from Bealtaine till Lunasa (beginning of August), middle is the summer solstice/Midsummer which was yesterday and absolutely beautiful here

-Autumn from Lúnasa till oíche Shamhna (Halloween/31st of October), with the autumn equinox in the middle and

-Winter from Oíche Shamhna till saint Bridget's day again, with Midwinter/winter solstice in the middle

I like this interpretation of the seasons.

Mine are: Heavenly summer -warm and hot, bittersweet but beautiful Fall, Winter Hell - cold and snow, and Hopeful Spring that it will get warm again. (I look for the first sign of crocuses because that gives me hope warm weather will come.) 

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Glasgowghirl
On 6/21/2019 at 2:32 AM, SportsgalAnnie said:

I thought the seasons were Football, Baseball, Hockey/Basketball


In all seriousness I live in TN we have been known to have all four seasons in a day.

Ha, here it's just football/soccer season, then Summer with a world cup or European Championship every other year that Scotland didn't qualify for or they were knocked out first round. That now applies to both the women and the men.

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Nervous
Satan'sFortress

I want to live somewhere that is in the 70s and sunny every day, and at night, you might need a light jacket or cardigan. Every day.  All year.  Maybe I need ceiling fans, but not necessarily whole house AC.  I will never need to scrape ice or snow off my car, or wear a heavy winter coat.  San Diego, CA seems to fit the bill nicely, except for the fact that I am not a millionaire!

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Smee
Posted (edited)
On 6/21/2019 at 8:40 PM, Someone Out There said:

Apparently the Indigenous people of Australia with their various countries (~250) defined 2 to 7 seasons with the most common being 6.  An interesting article on seasons in Australia can be found here: https://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/ockhamsrazor/sprinter-and-sprummer/5705564.

I was just going to say, my son (who is 7) came home from school the other day saying that there are 6 seasons in Kakadu National Park. Which makes sense because the whole idea of giving each “season” 3 months and expecting the weather to behave in a similar fashion for that time is not at all realistic for most tropical regions - or most of Australia at all, for that matter. Winter solstice is 21st June and I’ve been swimming the ocean in June before. Further north it’s probably always summer. I think it’s cool that they’re teaching kids this stuff in public schools now, because I’m pretty sure the sum of my grade 2 exposure to indigenous perspectives was doing dot paintings with cotton buds.

I doubt Jessa and family care that much what science says.

Edited by Smee

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Someone Out There
20 minutes ago, Smee said:

I was just going to say, my son (who is 7) came home from school the other day saying that there are 6 seasons in Kakadu National Park. Which makes sense because the whole idea of giving each “season” 3 months and expecting the weather to behave in a similar fashion for that time is not at all realistic for most tropical regions - or most of Australia at all, for that matter. Winter solstice is 21st June and I’ve been swimming the ocean in June before. Further north it’s probably always summer. I think it’s cool that they’re teaching kids this stuff in public schools now, because I’m pretty sure the sum of my grade 2 exposure to indigenous perspectives was doing dot paintings with cotton buds.

I doubt Jessa and family care that much what science says. 

I think the seasons mostly make sense as a time delimiter here... Up north it there would be at least the dry season, the build up to wet season, and wet season.  One of the speakers or tour guides in the trip I did last year made the comment that people from the south do the great northern migration during winter, during the build up people in the north do a southern migration.  The build up is when it is hot and very humid without the relief of rain.

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medimus
7 hours ago, Smee said:

I was just going to say, my son (who is 7) came home from school the other day saying that there are 6 seasons in Kakadu National Park. Which makes sense because the whole idea of giving each “season” 3 months and expecting the weather to behave in a similar fashion for that time is not at all realistic for most tropical regions - or most of Australia at all, for that matter. Winter solstice is 21st June and I’ve been swimming the ocean in June before. Further north it’s probably always summer. I think it’s cool that they’re teaching kids this stuff in public schools now, because I’m pretty sure the sum of my grade 2 exposure to indigenous perspectives was doing dot paintings with cotton buds.

I doubt Jessa and family care that much what science says.

The seasons as defined by 21st of June to 21st of September to 21st of December to 21st of March are not about weather though. They are about the tilt of the earth's axis. So they apply to the whole globe.

The seasons where we say that the summer solstice is midsummer and the winter solstice is midwinter are about daylight hours (also not about weather). These do apply globally but matter much much more the further away you are from the equator (currently I go to bed before it is dark and get up several hours after sunrise, there is technically no night, only twilight. In December I was at work before it was light and still there after sunset so never saw daylight. I was so excited the first time I left work and it was still just about twilight).


It makes complete sense that different places have different traditional seasons as defined by weather! And I expect there to be a huge, rich, interesting variety of them, but they are not the same as the astronomical seasons.

Super interested in the two-seven seasons!

8 hours ago, Satan'sFortress said:

I want to live somewhere that is in the 70s and sunny every day, and at night, you might need a light jacket or cardigan. Every day.  All year.  Maybe I need ceiling fans, but not necessarily whole house AC.  I will never need to scrape ice or snow off my car, or wear a heavy winter coat.  San Diego, CA seems to fit the bill nicely, except for the fact that I am not a millionaire!

We have a very stable temperature here, but it is stable at between 5 and 15 degrees celsius (which i think is mid forties to mid fifties farenheit?). The maximum temperature ever recorded here was 23 degrees which google tells me is 73° fahrenheit.

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adidas
8 hours ago, Smee said:

I was just going to say, my son (who is 7) came home from school the other day saying that there are 6 seasons in Kakadu National Park. Which makes sense because the whole idea of giving each “season” 3 months and expecting the weather to behave in a similar fashion for that time is not at all realistic for most tropical regions - or most of Australia at all, for that matter. Winter solstice is 21st June and I’ve been swimming the ocean in June before. Further north it’s probably always summer. I think it’s cool that they’re teaching kids this stuff in public schools now, because I’m pretty sure the sum of my grade 2 exposure to indigenous perspectives was doing dot paintings with cotton buds.

I doubt Jessa and family care that much what science says.

They teach six Indigenous seasons here (NSW) but Noongar seasons are based in WA and they change year by year depending on the weather. So I wish there was a local perspective. I think in Darwin they only have (and teach) two seasons - wet and dry. 

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Sairrr

In very northern Canada we’ve got almost winter, winter, not quite winter and construction.

Basically if it’s not winter I’m probably complaining about how hot it is because I can’t handle the heat for two months of summer. I mean, it’s about 9pm and it’s 18C (64F?) with the sun still beating down for a couple hours yet so it gets to be a bit much. (Yes, I do know that temperature is nothing for most people!)

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Cheetah
21 minutes ago, Sairrr said:

In very northern Canada we’ve got almost winter, winter, not quite winter and construction.

Basically if it’s not winter I’m probably complaining about how hot it is because I can’t handle the heat for two months of summer. I mean, it’s about 9pm and it’s 18C (64F?) with the sun still beating down for a couple hours yet so it gets to be a bit much. (Yes, I do know that temperature is nothing for most people!)

Ah I was going to drop the 'construction' one in but you beat me to it :-).  I was in Duluth MN last week and it was construction all over the place. 

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viii

In Saskatchewan we’ve got hockey is starting, balls deep into hockey, hockey is ending soon, and summer 😂

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Cheetah
On 6/22/2019 at 5:15 PM, Satan'sFortress said:

I want to live somewhere that is in the 70s and sunny every day, and at night, you might need a light jacket or cardigan. Every day.  All year.  Maybe I need ceiling fans, but not necessarily whole house AC.  I will never need to scrape ice or snow off my car, or wear a heavy winter coat.  San Diego, CA seems to fit the bill nicely, except for the fact that I am not a millionaire!

I nearly have that in the SF suburbs.  We had way too long of a rainy season this winter (although it was quite nice to finally get the entire state out of the long drought... Lake Shasta is full, etc) and I was kind of climbing the walls with the extended dreary weather.  None of it was especially bad compared to anywhere else, it just went on too long.  We've been having the perfect weather this past week though... sunny days and highs in the 70s, cooling off to the 50s overnight.   But yeah, the housing costs are crazy and the traffic sucks. 

When I was in Duluth I was reminded of my great aunts ... one of whom had had a place there and then the other had lived with her husband in Houston.  After the husband died, they started trading off living in Duluth over the summers and in Houston over the winters.  Win-win.  

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Sairrr
5 minutes ago, Cheetah said:

Ah I was going to drop the 'construction' one in but you beat me to it :-).  I was in Duluth MN last week and it was construction all over the place. 

Construction has sprung up everywhere around here by now too! Frustrating when you’re expecting to only ever spend 10-15 minutes getting literally anywhere and suddenly you’re stuck in a line of traffic!

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Cheetah
On 6/21/2019 at 3:18 AM, Irishy said:

No defined seasons here in Ireland thanks to the Gulf Stream. You might get the same temps and conditions on Christmas Day as June 1st. Mild, damp and grey. The only way we know it’s summer is that it’s light 19 hours a day (today!) and miserable darkness by 4pm in winter. This summer is not going well so far. Haven’t shown off my beautiful coral shellac pedicure yet.

Are you guys getting the heat wave that continental Europe is getting this week?

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Smee
7 hours ago, Sairrr said:

In very northern Canada we’ve got almost winter, winter, not quite winter and construction.

Basically if it’s not winter I’m probably complaining about how hot it is because I can’t handle the heat for two months of summer. I mean, it’s about 9pm and it’s 18C (64F?) with the sun still beating down for a couple hours yet so it gets to be a bit much. (Yes, I do know that temperature is nothing for most people!)

So, where I live it’s currently 9:40pm and 14C... in the middle of winter... and rather than laugh at you, I’m thinking how if my husband gets the 1yr exchange to Canada we’re applying for, my whole “I’m not cold! I prefer the cold! Much rather be cold than hot” attitude is going to bite me in the ass come Canadian winter. Also, good to know I probably won’t need to pack shorts. I tend to be in jeans once it drops below 24C.

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