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singsingsing

The Victorian Duggars

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KnittingOwl
13 hours ago, PlentyOfJesusFishInTheSea said:

I hate-read a romance novel once set in the 1880s wild west and the French immigrant heroine was called Sharisse! Hahahaha, the French don't even have an SH! It also has the absolute best/worst cover of all time (which is why I picked it up):

https://www.fictiondb.com/author/johanna-lindsey~tender-is-the-storm~23389~b.htm

That sounds terrible, but possibly in the so bad it’s good camp. Seems like perfect beach reading for my trip next week 

On 3/25/2019 at 9:29 AM, mango_fandango said:

I was also thinking of Friends :pb_lol: funny how popular culture influences names. Khaleesi is growing in usage for example. 

Arya is becoming very popular. It was ranked 942 for girls’ names in 2010, but was up to 135 in 2017. 

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CarrotCake

Hmm I wanted to check my own name as well but unfortunately I can only find the top 100 names in the Netherlands over time and my name was not that popular in my birth year. I did find out that apparently my 2nd and 3rd name were ranked 1 and 2 in my birth year. I guess the ranking also includes middle names because Maria was nr 1 (my third name) and it is almost never given as a first name here.

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Stokstaartje

I tried to make a Dutch Duggars list. But unfortunaly I ran out of time. (Damn you law school!) 

Here are at the very least the parents and first 3 kids. 
 

Hendrik Petrus Duggar (born July 18, 1965)  married Anna Josephina Duggar (September 13, 1966)

 

Their children are:

1.       Mark Michael Duggar (born March 3, 1988)

2.       Jantina Roos Duggar (born January 12, 1990)

3.       Stefan Mark Duggar (born January 12, 1990)

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Stokstaartje
35 minutes ago, CarrotCake said:

Hahah no way, I was doing exactly the same thing!

But I could not get it to work on more than the top 100 names, so I don't know how you got Jana to work for instance.

 

I used this website from the Volkskrant. If you use the sliders to only select one year you get a ranking off the top 600(??). Downsite is that it is not numberd. You have to count for yourself. But they are grouped in tens. 

For the top 100 I used the database from the meertens institute,.

 

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CarrotCake
Posted (edited)
49 minutes ago, Stokstaartje said:

I used this website from the Volkskrant. If you use the sliders to only select one year you get a ranking off the top 600(??). Downsite is that it is not numberd. You have to count for yourself. But they are grouped in tens. 

For the top 100 I used the database from the meertens institute,.

 

Thanks! I indeed used Meertens as well.

I will adjust it later 🙂

Edited by CarrotCake

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Waffle Time
catlady

Hi!  My name is Minnie Wilda. 

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CarrotCake
Posted (edited)

I adjusted my list!

Edit: shit I made a mistake but I cannot edit my post anymore. I used timeperiod birthyear - 2016 instead of birthyear only.

 

This is the real list, names with stars I used the lowest name with that letter with at least 5 babies with that name:

 

Hendrik Petrus & Anna Josephina Duggar

Kids and spouses:

Mark Michael & Leonie Priscilla Duggar

Diana Natasha Duggar 

Stefan Mark & Nellie Sabrina Duggar

Beau Esther & Simon Johannes Dillard

Janetta* Anna & Koen Thomas Seewald

Jolie* Anouk & Wouter Thomas Vuolo

Martijn Glenn & Janna Veronique Duggar

Lex Thomas & Kim Marielle* Duggar

Hanneke Maaike & Joey Maas* Forsyth

Joas* Bas Duggar

Rutger Bas Duggar

Jordy Max Duggar

Lucas Niels Duggar

Mike Bas Duggar

Mees Brent Duggar

Sylvie Charlotte Duggar

Loïs Karlijn Duggar

Pleun-Roos Martje Duggar

Romaissa Maria Duggar 

 

 

Funfact: I now share first name with a Duggar 😁

 

Edited by CarrotCake

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Nervous
Audrey2
1 hour ago, catlady said:

Hi!  My name is Minnie Wilda. 

My Great-Aunt Minnie was born in 1897. She lived several states away, so I think i only saw her once when I was about a year old, but I loved writing her. It's a good name!

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Giddy
SweetJuly

I really enjoy asking people from around the world how they feel about certain names.

For example, my husband is (Francophone) Belgian. I like to throw random French names at him and let him tell me if he thinks the names are old-fashioned or modern, ugly or nice, weird or normal. It's a lot of fun because it's usually very surprising. Names that seem like totally normal French names to me he'll consider awful or terribly outdated.

In turn, I am then very happy to spend hours explaining the intricacies and associations that exist for names in Germany and Israel.

So, please, fellow name nerds, share away - what are modern and old-fashioned names in Mexico? what would a Renaissance heroine from Florence likely/never be called? what would a Japanese peasant and aristocrat be named in the 19th century? are there regional differences in first names given in the US?

I'm curious about all this and more :)

 

 

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justmy2cents

@SweetJuly I should have thought about that before choosing my daughter's Hebrew name. According to my Israeli friend I chose an old fashioned one. She scolded me for not consulting with her first, 😂 

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JermajestyDuggar

I guess I’m Ethel Eleonore. 🙈

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Wine time!
allthegoodnamesrgone
10 hours ago, nastyhobbitses said:

I don't read/watch Outlander, but this issue bugged me so much when I read some synopses to see if I'd be interested in the show: I don't know if the situation was the same in Britain/Ireland, but Brianna wasn't really used as a name in the US until the 70s, if Google/a baby name popularity stats graph is serving me correctly. And in my mind, it's a very early 2000s name. A girl named Brianna in the 1950s sounds very out of place to me. 

The name Brianna has been around since the late 19th century, though very uncommon, I was looking it ups and it seems like it has always been very uncommon but I've known one my whole life, I graduated from HS with a girl named Brianna, she was born in 1969 or 70, so I didn't realize it was that unusual. My friend was going to name a baby Brianna if they'd had a girl, her dh's name is Brian and her's is Anna, but they had 2 boys. 

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BachelorToTheRapture
10 hours ago, nastyhobbitses said:

I don't read/watch Outlander, but this issue bugged me so much when I read some synopses to see if I'd be interested in the show: I don't know if the situation was the same in Britain/Ireland, but Brianna wasn't really used as a name in the US until the 70s, if Google/a baby name popularity stats graph is serving me correctly. And in my mind, it's a very early 2000s name. A girl named Brianna in the 1950s sounds very out of place to me. 

I'm early 1990s and I know a TON of Brianna/Briana/Breanna, etc. very close to my age. I think you may be off by a few years on when it became popular unless you're thinking of a specific spelling (I dont remember who all has which spelling).

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JermajestyDuggar

You all should watch the episode of The Unbreakable Kimmie Schmidt where there’s a baby called Linda :5624798180220_Jigglejiggledance:

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SorenaJ

Now that we are talking about names, can I ask a question about Hispanic American naming practices in the US? Sometimes I'll hear about Hispanic Americans with a Spanish-sounding first name, Jorge, Carlos, Camila etc and other time someone with a Spanish sounding surname will have more English-sounding names like John, Kelly, Christine etc. 

Is there a trend? Does it depend on how long/how many generations the person has been in the US? Does it depend on what Central or Southern American country the person is from? Social class? Sex of the baby? Basically how come you see some Hispanic American with English sounding names and some with Spanish sounding? What is most common? 

Also do Hispanic Americans keep the two-surname practice of Central and Southern American countries or they adopt the one-surname practice of the US? 

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front hugs > duggs

Not a Hispanic American, so I could be well off, but I imagine it has to do with how strong your ties are to your culture. As a Jewish American, I know several Jewish people with more Israeli or biblical names. My Hebrew school was filled with Sarahs, Jacobs, Rebeccas, Shaynas, Leahs, etc. I also know Jewish people who are less into Judaism as a religion or culture, or it doesn't play as important a role in their lives. These families had kids named Andrew, Lauren, Michael, Matthew, Ryan, etc.

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BachelorToTheRapture

I'm also not Hispanic, but have seen a lot of first generation who married someone from their own culture choosing more Hispanic names (though often ones that are more common in the U.S.) and a lot who grew up in the US (whether they were born here or immigrated as children) or who marry non-Hispanic people choosing more standard American names. I've seen similar trends with a lot of immigrants. 

If anyone (particularly if you're Hispanic American or an immigrant) has more insight I'd love to hear it!

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TZmom
12 hours ago, KnittingOwl said:

That sounds terrible, but possibly in the so bad it’s good camp. Seems like perfect beach reading for my trip next week 

Arya is becoming very popular. It was ranked 942 for girls’ names in 2010, but was up to 135 in 2017. 

My son has two Arya's with slightly different spellings in his kindergarten class of 18 kids. 

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Mama Mia
On 3/25/2019 at 7:44 AM, mango_fandango said:

I thought Emma was a pretty good bet for a 30 year old. Then I realised that this is probably me coming from an English perspective; Emma has been very popular in England for decades, so a 30 year old Emma is entirely feasible. I gather that Emma’s popularity in the US is more recent. Brayden is definitely far more incongruous for a 30 year old.

When my mum was born in 1968, she was given a name that was very unusual, as she was growing up very few people were called it, but nowadays it is very popular. It’s originally a Shakespearean name (granddad is a BIG Shakespeare fan), but her middle name is pretty classic for her age. 

I have kids in their  late 20’sand Emma and Emily were really popular. We’re in California. 

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Eponine
5 hours ago, SweetJuly said:

I really enjoy asking people from around the world how they feel about certain names.

For example, my husband is (Francophone) Belgian. I like to throw random French names at him and let him tell me if he thinks the names are old-fashioned or modern, ugly or nice, weird or normal. It's a lot of fun because it's usually very surprising. Names that seem like totally normal French names to me he'll consider awful or terribly outdated.

In turn, I am then very happy to spend hours explaining the intricacies and associations that exist for names in Germany and Israel.

So, please, fellow name nerds, share away - what are modern and old-fashioned names in Mexico? what would a Renaissance heroine from Florence likely/never be called? what would a Japanese peasant and aristocrat be named in the 19th century? are there regional differences in first names given in the US?

I'm curious about all this and more :)

 

 

Not exactly what you're asking for, but I worked as a nanny for a bit in France several years ago and there must have been a surge of girls named Salomé - there were, I think 3, in the grade of the 3-4 year old I took care of. I always had a hard time imagining that name taking off in the US due to the religious and sort of scandalous associations!

I have a name that ends in an A, and there is a French version that doesn't end like that (as no traditional French names really do), and so many people insisted on using my actual name because it sounded "nicer and more elegant" to them than the French version, while here in the US many people think traditional French names sound classy and nice. Shrug.

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Mama Mia
2 hours ago, SorenaJ said:

Now that we are talking about names, can I ask a question about Hispanic American naming practices in the US? Sometimes I'll hear about Hispanic Americans with a Spanish-sounding first name, Jorge, Carlos, Camila etc and other time someone with a Spanish sounding surname will have more English-sounding names like John, Kelly, Christine etc. 

Is there a trend? Does it depend on how long/how many generations the person has been in the US? Does it depend on what Central or Southern American country the person is from? Social class? Sex of the baby? Basically how come you see some Hispanic American with English sounding names and some with Spanish sounding? What is most common? 

Also do Hispanic Americans keep the two-surname practice of Central and Southern American countries or they adopt the one-surname practice of the US? 

Just anecdotally, I think there’s a big range in naming. I know Latino people  who have been here many, many generations, others who are first or second generation, others who were born out of the US, mostly in Mexico, but some from Central/South America —- some have traditionally Hispanic ( or indigenous) names. Others have more typically Anglo or trendy / alternative names. Even within the same family. There doesn’t seem to be much, if any, consistency or reasoning, other than liking a name. Some are family names, others from a popular show or singer or what’s trending or a baby name book . Also, there are many names that can “sound” either Anglo or Latino depending on pronunciation. 

As far as the two last names - I know a few people who do that, but more often with using the mothers last name as their middle name. I see it more with boys. 

Again, all anecdotal, but I used to sort through lots of forms that have this info, as well as my friends and family info, in an area of the US with a very high Latino population.  

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Netflix&Grading

Poor Millard Dillard and Hyman😂

Mine would be Vergie Antonette. My first name is already considered an old lady name by most and the only women I’ve met with my name are around age 70-80, so I think I could rock Vergie if I had to. My middle name wasn’t ranked the year I was born and hasn’t been since so I used the last ranking it had which was more than 10 yrs before I was born. 

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Vivi_music
Posted (edited)
13 hours ago, SweetJuly said:

I really enjoy asking people from around the world how they feel about certain names.

For example, my husband is (Francophone) Belgian. I like to throw random French names at him and let him tell me if he thinks the names are old-fashioned or modern, ugly or nice, weird or normal. It's a lot of fun because it's usually very surprising. Names that seem like totally normal French names to me he'll consider awful or terribly outdated.

In turn, I am then very happy to spend hours explaining the intricacies and associations that exist for names in Germany and Israel.

So, please, fellow name nerds, share away - what are modern and old-fashioned names in Mexico? what would a Renaissance heroine from Florence likely/never be called? what would a Japanese peasant and aristocrat be named in the 19th century? are there regional differences in first names given in the US?

I'm curious about all this and more :)

 

 

I think you are right, as to what is considered old or strange name is essentially based on the culture you grew up in. My personal gold mine for weird names are 19th century French-Canadian names (especially the second half of the 19th century to be more precise). At least, I should say these names sound weird to me in my own reality. When I do abstraction of the time-period they are associated with, I can sort of see some beauty in them. But considering they feel so outdated and eccentric for French-speaking Quebecers and Canadians alike, my mind will not really consider them as names I could ever give a child.

A quick look at a free online genealogy website and in 5 minutes (okay maybe 10 because I fall down the rabbit whole easily) I was able to find these gems: Alcide, Severe, Ovide, Télésphore, Donat (this one if so bad. From what I Googled, it is the French version of the Latin Donatus, but still... not pretty. The feminine form is worst: Donatienne), Onésime, Eusèbe, Isidore, Magloire (litteraly meaning ''my glory''), Elzéar, Herménégilde, and of course... a bunch of little Napoléon.

For the ladies: Alphrosine, Delima, Auxilia and Exilda (lots of X), Delvica, Domithilde, Scholastique, Tharsile, Pétronille, Leocadie.

And of course the strange names that were sort of invented and only in feminine names. Archange is a good example, which literally means ''Archangel''. Their were also baby girls names Desneiges (means "of the snows" in French, taken from the title of the Virgin Mary ''Notre Dame des Neiges'' meaning "Our Lady of the Snows") and Desanges (Meaning ''of the angels'' and I wonder if it also comes from the devotionnal title ''Mary Queen of Angels''). I know Rose-de-Lima was also used as a given name in honor of Saint Rose of Lima. They could just have named her Rose, but nope! Got to be over-the-top French Canadian Catholics after all. And of course, my own favourite: Jeanne-d'Arc as a given name. Not Jeanne, but the full on ''Jeanne-d'Arc'' followed by a family name. I kind of understand why these will never do a come-back.

PS: I have wondered if they had too much time to think of baby names in the dead of canadian winter. :pb_lol:

 

Edited by Vivi_music
Je ne sais pas écrire en anglais

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KnittingOwl

Did this for my family:

Samuel Jim & Mary Ellie

Daughter 1: Rachel (middle name not ranked)

Daughter 2: Aileen Alice

However, daughter 2 was born in 2018 and name stats aren’t out yet so I used 2017/1917 data. 

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VelociRapture

@nastyhobbitses To be fair to the author this one time:

I think the unusual name was a decent choice given the circumstances of Brianna’s conception and birth*. Also, Claire picked the name because Jamie told her to name the baby for his father (Brian) if it was a boy and I’m guessing she didn’t feel up for picking a new baby name all things considered.

*For those unaware, Claire accidentally travels back in time to Scotland of the 1700s, is forced into marriage with a super hot Highland warrior (who is portrayed as so perfect that it’s actually really obnoxious), gets pregnant, and then returns to her own time (and first husband) because Scotland fails to overthrow England and everyone is going to suffer horribly and/or die. 

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