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Coconut Flan

JRod 90: Mrs. Bennett with Goat Photos

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HarryPotterFan
15 hours ago, nastyhobbitses said:

Ella Enchanted was my fucking JAM when I was a kid. The movie was an abomination, though. 

I LOVE that book. To this day I want to throttle the idiots who made the movie.

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Black Aliss
17 hours ago, KnittingOwl said:

I’m really loving the discussion of YA books. If anyone has recommendations for a 7-year old girl (reading at 2-3 grade level), I’d love them! She really likes the Princess in Black, Junie B. Jones, and Mercy Williams books. We started reading Harry Potter together. 

Anything by Lynne Reid Banks (author of the Indian in the Cupboard series discussed earlier) but especially The Fairy Rebel and The Farthest Away Mountain. The Betsy-Tacy books by Maud Hart Lovelace would be appropriate, especially the earliest ones where Betsy, Tacy, and Tib are about 7 years old. The Redwall series by Brian Jacques has a lot of strong female characters (all animals; there are no humans in his books).

ETA: I can't believe no one as mentioned the Pippi Longstocking books, so hated by fundies because Pippi has no tolerance for authority figures.

For YA titles, If I had one chance to travel back in time I would bring The Blue Sword and The Hero and the Crown, both by Robin McKinley, to my 10 year old self, who desperately needed those books back then.

Edited by Black Aliss
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thoughtful

I completely forget to mention my sci-fi and dystopia stage - anybody beside me read Heinlein, Bradbury, Asimov and Clarke?

One of my best book sources, besides the library, was an older cousin's room, where I went to be alone during family visits. I remember sitting on the floor, reading his copy of Make Room! Make Room! which gave me some nightmares, and Johnny Got His Gun, which gave me a lot of nightmares.

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Waffle Time
Blessings of the Corn

Re: Old Yeller and Where the Red Fern Grows: I am still scarred from Old Yeller. I refuse to read/or watch the movie - it only took one time for both. I will still read/watch Where the Red Fern Grows and cry my eyes out.

Also, whenever anyone asks me about celebrity crushes I kind of laugh. My first crushes were fictional book characters; mainly: Gilbert Blythe from Anne of Green Gables, Professor Bhaer from Little Women, and  Dr. Neil MacNeill from Christy - these are ones I remember the most. I have always had odd taste. :)

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thoughtful

Another heartbreaker in the vein of The Yearling and Where the Red Fern Grows was Goodbye, My Lady.

I've re-watched the film of it recently enough to know that stereotypes and painful dog-training practices abound, but can't remember the book well enough to know if it is cringeworthy for those reasons. The film provides a nice look at an early Sidney Poitier performance, and an adorable Basenji:

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Aggravated
Loveday
On 3/14/2019 at 1:17 PM, FleeJanaFree said:

Phyllis Reynolds Naylor is most well known for Shiloh, but I have to recommend her Alice series. They are still so relevant today, and I can't  wait to  give them to my nieces. Typically each school year (6th grade through senior year) has 4 books. They are the most realistic tween/teenager books I've ever read and I still read them often now in my thirties. One thing I love about the series is she's doesn't tackle a hard subject and it's gone and dealt with problem solved forevermore. Like sexual assault- most of us don't have a solitary incident in our lives. It's an ongoing occurrence in society. At different times in the series Alice's deals with it (wondering if Patrick putting lemons On  her boobs while she sleeps is assault, a teacher rubbing up against her from behind, an attempted rape in college, etc) Two of her friends were taken advantage by men older than them, etc. she writes them in such a smart, thoughtful  way. I love how these books deal with sex as a subject.

youll adore her dad, Ben. She wrote a final book to wrap up her life, college through retirement and I SOBBED when he died. 

Im going to write her an actual letter letting her know what an impact she had on me. 

I know you wrote this four pages back, but I'm just catching up and had to comment on this. I LOVED the Alice books! I started getting them for my daughter when she was in about 5th grade, and we read them together for several years. But it sounds like we missed the last book or two--I didn't know Alice's dad dies! :cry:  I don't know if I can handle it--but I'll risk it, I'm going to put the ones I missed on reserve at the library right now!

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WhatWouldJohnCrichtonDo?
17 hours ago, KnittingOwl said:

I’m really loving the discussion of YA books. If anyone has recommendations for a 7-year old girl (reading at 2-3 grade level), I’d love them! She really likes the Princess in Black, Junie B. Jones, and Mercy Williams books. We started reading Harry Potter together. 

If she likes fairies, there's a series by Kiki Thorpe set in Neverland, with human girls visiting the fairies there. The first book is called In a Blink. My daughter got the first one at our school's book fair when she was in 2nd or 3rd grade. She has at least 15 of them now. 

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Peaches-n-Beans
8 hours ago, thoughtful said:

So, this brings up another fun question - what are everyone's experiences with reading something aimed at an age much younger or older than you were at the time (or are now), or other people giving you the "You're reading that? At your age?" reaction?

Never from my parents, my mom let us read pretty much anything and assumed we wouldn't understand if it was too mature (And she was right I was 20 before I realized there was a lot of graphic sex in "It") my dad is well read but in a different way then my mom so I think a lot of the time my sister and I were reading things that were "too mature" he hadn't read them and didn't know they were too mature. 

My grandmother on the other hand, well basically she was a 4th grade teacher from the midwest and though she had never read 90% of the things I read she used to comment on everything. "Harry Potter" "Percy Jackson" anything Stephen King (Which okay was completely fair I should not have had a small library of stephen king at 12) basically if it wasn't perceived as "Christian" we got a comment. 

EDIT: Okay old yeller scarred me for life. I read it when I was about nine and ever since then Rabies has been on the top of my worst fear list. It's completely irrational I know, but when I used to feed a colony of feral cats I carried around a can of green beans to throw at rabid foxes. Yes there were rabid foxes, several of my fellow colony feeders had seen them and that was enough for me.

Edited by Peaches-n-Beans

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thoughtful
11 minutes ago, Peaches-n-Beans said:

I carried around a can of green beans to throw at rabid foxes

Well, now we are back on-topic! Jill would say that a green been can is a great weapon, since Satan is in there!

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Meh
Evangeline
37 minutes ago, Peaches-n-Beans said:

I carried around a can of green beans to throw at rabid foxes. Yes there were rabid foxes, several of my fellow colony feeders had seen them and that was enough for me.

300 pages of YA book drift and we come full circle back to Jill. 

Well done, folks, well done. 

Jill, we just can't quit you! 

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Wine time!
Spanger

There were no books I was FORBIDDEN to read.  There were a few books I’d see my mom reading and be curious about, that she either told me I should wait until I was older, or talk to her about it while I read them- off the top of my head, it was “Memoirs of a Geisha,” “She’s Come Undone” and “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings.”  The only one I pushed to read ASAP was She’s Come Undone (I liked the cover!).  I don’t think I really absorbed the scenes she was most worried about me reading, but I also didn’t finish the book the first time I tried to read it.  Now that I’m older I think the connection was she wanted to talk to me about books with non-consensual sex, which makes sense, and I’m glad I wasn’t banned from them.

My parents really let me and my sister have free reign.  Honestly, disappearing into books was the only thing we all had in common with eachother, lol.  But going to the library with my dad and little sister every week was SUCH a huge part of my childhood.  My dad once told me the one of the things that made him love my mom was that she actually read books- (that and my older half brother, not my dad’s bio-kid, but my dad loved HIM as much as he loved my mom.  My dad was a catch, I guess!)

Anyway- if I could call out one book I maybe wish I’d been banned from- I wish I hadn’t encountered “IT” as young as I did.  There was a certain scene with a toothless old homeless man trying to earn a dime that scarred me deeply- even though I re-read it like 7 times when I came across it.  The clown was fine by me, and overall the book was not ‘too scary’- just not the right literary tid-bit to come across at the time I did.

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Waffle Time
mango_fandango

I was never forbidden any books either. My tastes (when younger) were not really what could be perceived as “dodgy”, though.

I never much liked “teen” books because they were aaaallllll about romance/snagging “the guy”; I know relationships are often a big “thing” for teens but they were all pretty much the same old story. I also had no interest in boys at all at that age; I’m straight, it was just a case of boys not really crossing my radar. I’ve not read (much) chick lit either; I’ve flicked through some at the charity shop I volunteer for and they are also very formulaic. They’re mostly set in England, although I imagine American chick-lit is similar. 

One thing I did read that was outside of my usual range was Brave New World (Aldous Huxley). I’d read 1984 for school and found it pretty interesting, and knew that Brave New World is also a well-known dystopian book. I have also read some more YA-oriented dystopian books — more samey plots — but not Hunger Games although I know the general story through googling. 

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Ms. Squishels

One of my favorite things about being a parent was getting to re-read all the books I loved as a kid by reading them out loud or listening to them on audio books with my son.  I loved sharing my love of books with him.  And then he got to have Harry Potter and lots of other great books for his generation.  We loved Hank the Cowdog so much.  My son was in a Hank the Cowdog fan club and got a news letter every month for a while.  BTW, has anyone mentioned Pippi Longstocking??  I so wanted to be her!   My son and I also loved Watership Down.  I don't love the thread drifts either, but I couldn't help myself.  :). Okay.  Come on Jill.  We miss you, Silly Jilly.

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waltraute
I completely forget to mention my sci-fi and dystopia stage - anybody beside me read Heinlein, Bradbury, Asimov and Clarke?
One of my best book sources, besides the library, was an older cousin's room, where I went to be alone during family visits. I remember sitting on the floor, reading his copy of Make Room! Make Room! which gave me some nightmares, and Johnny Got His Gun, which gave me a lot of nightmares.
Yes, yes, yes, and YES. I think I read everything by Bradbury and moved on from there to every sci-fi book I could get my hands on, and especially the books by the authors you mention.

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J.O.Y.nomore
5 hours ago, thoughtful said:

I completely forget to mention my sci-fi and dystopia stage - anybody beside me read Heinlein, Bradbury, Asimov and Clarke?

One of my best book sources, besides the library, was an older cousin's room, where I went to be alone during family visits. I remember sitting on the floor, reading his copy of Make Room! Make Room! which gave me some nightmares, and Johnny Got His Gun, which gave me a lot of nightmares.

I'm still in my sci-fi and dystopia stage! ;)

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Dandruff
16 minutes ago, waltraute said:

Yes, yes, yes, and YES. I think I read everything by Bradbury and moved on from there to every sci-fi book I could get my hands on, and especially the books by the authors you mention.

@thoughtful, you, and I must be triplets.  I've since expanded my range of genres, but doubt I'll ever lose my affinity for SF.  As an adult I've also enjoyed many of the "Dune" (Herbert), "Gateway" (Pohl), and "Ender" (Card) series books.

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Peaches-n-Beans

Y'all i wish I was joking about the green beans but @frumperlicious can confirm I am not the only one in our cat feeding group who carried around canned veggies to toss at rabid animals. The Rabies problem was that bad in our town. Thankfully all the cats were vaccinated or I may not have been able to stomach it. The "irrational" fear of rabies is suddenly a lot less irrational when you're confronted with it

that and my dumba** picked up a bat in a shoebox in my backyard when I was 8 and came (this) close to needing a round of rabies shots. Thankfully the rat wasn't rabid but if anything put the fear of god into me it was that. 

Or is it the fear of Jill?.... 🤔

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Wine time!
justmissedquiver

I've had the envy monster raise its head reading all your amazing posts about YA and kids lit. My fundie parents kept books out of the house. I'm taking notes about what to look for at our up coming library sales 😁

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Puzzled
precious blessing

@Pecansforeveryone I loved The Witch of Blackbird Pond! I'd forgotten the name of it, but I remember doing a small book report for it where I dressed up as a character in the 6th grade.

I've never been a big reader, but my teachers always assumed I was and they pushed me to read independently, which I'm only now realizing was a really great thing of them to do. In the 5th grade, my science teacher made me read The Giver.

My sister and I loved the Dear America series and Goosebumps, I still have many of the books. Harry Potter, The Chronicles of Narnia, Jane Austen, etc... My mom read us Where The Red Fern Grows, The Bridge to Terabithia...

During middle school, after classes I would wait at the nearby library for a couple hours before my mom picked me up. I ended up reading Shakespeare for the first time then (A Midsummer Night's Dream, Twelfth Night, in particular), Lord of the Flies, E.A. Poe, Robert Frost, books about drying flowers, and the occult.

Edited by precious blessing

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sparkles

Sorta late the to the book discussion but I had to chime in. I was a voracious reader as a kid but strangely, I can remember very little of what I read. I was never much into series books, although I read at least one Nancy Drew, Cherry Ames and Bobbsey Twins book but didn’t think much of them. Never read the Little House books or Anne of Green Gables and so forth and still don’t know why. Hands down, my favorite book as a kid (which I got through a kid’s Book of the Month Club) was Joan Aiken’s “The Wolves of Willoughby Chase.” I wanted to be just like Bonnie, who didn’t take shit from anyone. They made it into a horrible movie and it still pains my heart. I also loved “The Spider Plant,” which was written by my great-aunt Yetta Speevak. Very cool story about a Puerto Rican girl in NYC. I actually bought a copy of it last year, since I’d lost my original.

I did read a lot of YA as an adult because my daughter was a (very young) spontaneous reader and finding material that was both age appropriate and suitable for her reading level was quite a chore. (I finally gave up and let her read whatever she wanted.) “Holes” was a big standout. I loved that book.

So do any FJers of um,  a certain age remember SRA? Those color-coded reading cards that came in a big box? I got in major trouble in second grade for sneaking off to read them instead of doing my lessons. 

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notarocketstoveman
28 minutes ago, sparkles said:

So do any FJers of um,  a certain age remember SRA? Those color-coded reading cards that came in a big box? I got in major trouble in second grade for sneaking off to read them instead of doing my lessons. 

I freakin' loved SRA! I wish I could find them at a garage sale.

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Waffle Time
BlackberryGirl

I annoyed the shit out of my 6th grade teacher by finishing the entire SRA pack in about 4 days. He gave up trying to test me and just let me read whatever I wanted and do 3 paragraph book reports. 

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HarryPotterFan
10 hours ago, J.O.Y.nomore said:

I'm still in my sci-fi and dystopia stage! ;)

I liked dystopia until Trump got elected and then it felt too real...

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anachronistic
2 hours ago, justmissedquiver said:

I've had the envy monster raise its head reading all your amazing posts about YA and kids lit. My fundie parents kept books out of the house. I'm taking notes about what to look for at our up coming library sales 😁

Oh my goodness! Justmissedquiver, you are so lucky! (I’m not being sarcastic.) You have before you a huge, huge FEAST of deliciousness, a table heaving with everything good. And most YA and kids books can be consumed in an hour or an afternoon. If you don’t like something, don’t finish it. You won’t have books forced down your throat in school until you utterly despise a perfectly good book (Bridge to Terebithia) and you will know the meanings of all the words. The first bite of an apple is the best - this is a fact. And the first read of a book is also the best. You have so many marvelous first reads! You’re going to have a wonderful time!

Some people go to Disney world as a kid and have a good time and look back at it fondly later. Some people go there as an adult and have just as good a time but are able to better recall it. You have better than Disney world. You have better than a water park. You have BOOKS and stories and adventures and being able to love a character without knowing that they die - is it appropriate to wish you bon voyage?

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SilentSnark

I was an avid reader growing up and read well above my age range. I was reading at a college level in middle school, and I don’t remember my parents ever restricting my reading choices - I was reading the adult left behind books in late elementary school (which although Christian at the time, the books themselves could get pretty explicit). I don’t read as much now but that’s due to a lack of time and my own inability to moderate my reading. Typically if I pick up a book I’ll read it in one sitting due to being a fast reader and being deeply engrossed in the story. It’s hard to carve out single chunks of the day like that sometimes. But I also suffer from headaches. I need to look into audiobooks more, I’ve only just gotten into podcasts and become mildly obsessed. I never got into audiobooks the way I got into actual books but perhaps I need to give it another shot. 

 

On a Jill note: I have to say I’m always hopeful and surprised when a Jill topic becomes hot - I can’t remember ever hoping a girl would get married off, but dang I wish so hard for Nurie. I feel like for all of the kids, marriage and getting outside of their extremely isolated family bubble is going to be a positively life changing experience - for the better. Those kids are so crippled, I’m honestly surprised that Timothy has stuck it out so far in his college pursuits. I feel like moving across the country and engaging in non-homeschool educational activities, while also working full time and living without his siblings and parents is a huge adjustment to make. I’m happy and pleased he seems to be doing so well - I think it would be easily to fail, ie tuck tail and come home. It’s just so many life lessons to learn all at once. I can’t begin to imagine how it will be for the girls and getting married, but marriage seems like the only way the girls will have even part of a “normal” (relatively speaking) world open to them. Jill is just so damn toxic. 

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