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Polio is back, yes polio


laPapessaGiovanna
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Authorities have confirmed a case of polio in Venezuela. The first after 30 years. There are other four reported cases not yet confirmed. They don't yet know if it's a wild strain or a mutated virus derived from vaccinated people that spread due to the country desperately deteriorating situation. The reported case is from April.

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There are not a lot of things I want go yell at the world on my Facebook. Like, ever.

I’m not saying that particularly snarkily.

Edited by AliceInFundyland
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This is a link to the current spread of polio, although they don't have the Venezuelan case listed yet. One positive thing is that there aren't any new cases in Syria so far this year. But we already have more cases than we did at this point last year. :( 

http://polioeradication.org/polio-today/polio-now/this-week/

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It seems almost impossible to imagine. I just don’t have any words for how scary this seems. 

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This is bad news. 

Grew up in the 1950s & so had the vaccine, thank heaven.

My parents recalled vividly how no one went to public swimming pools or other gathering places in the summer (in the 1930s & 1940s) because thatʻs when polio seemed to be spread the most easily.

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This is horrible. My grandparents managed to avoid polio but some of their friends died or were permanently disabled by it :(

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In Venezuela there's no vaccines or treatments to anything (not even alcohol in the hospitals). A lot of "old" diseases are back in there.

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12 hours ago, AmazonGrace said:

Just what we need.

My grandma had polio as a child and she always had a limp because of it.

My grandmother had it at age 19(while she was carrying my mom), and was on crutches, and later in a wheelchair, for the rest of her life. 

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My uncle had polio as a child and was left pretty disabled overall. :( He caught it as a young child before the vaccines became wide spread. 

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My Aunt had it when she was a teenager, she was on crutches for many years and eventually in a wheelchair. She was never able to live independently but she lived with my parents. They built their garage into an apartment for her, she was a seamstress and was at least able to earn a little money. But she never married or had the life that she wanted. She helped raise us, and we loved her dearly, but I'm pretty sure she wanted her own family.  It's a horrifying disease. We named our daughter after her.

My late boss's daughter had it when she was young teen, she went from being a gifted dancer to unable to walk without crutches. She had health issues all her life, she was able to have one child but she was never really strong. She died in her 70's, but was never really healthy.

The thought of something like polio coming back is terrifying. I read that Kat Von D is not going to vaccinate her children.  I want to shake her until her teeth fall out!

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1 minute ago, Briefly said:

The thought of something like polio coming back is terrifying. I read that Kat Von D is not going to vaccinate her children.  I want to shake her until her teeth fall out!

That makes me think. It seems like those who choose not to vaccinate fall into two camps- the ones whose children had terrible reactions to the vaccinations they had, so no more are attempted, and those who choose not to vaccinate for other reasons. I wonder, how many cases (and/or famous cases) it would take to get some who choose not to (for example, the ones that believe vaccinations cause autism or that humankind has fought the diseases for centuries) to vaccinate, or if it would even make a difference.

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Neighbor maybe 15 years ago did not vaccinate his young kids, until he got  a post-doc in the Middle East.  Then the entire family got the full sequence for everybody before leaving the US.  

Pakistan, Afghanistan and Nigeria still had polio cases as recently as four years ago, and health-care workers in Pakistan and Afghanistan attempting to vaccinate for polio are murdered periodically, as recently as January of this year.  At this point, more people are dying from trying to prevent polio in those countries than are dying or sickened from the disease.  Thanks, Taliban.  Google "health care workers vaccinating for polio killed in Afghanistan and Pakistan" and quite a few articles will come up. 

Edited by Howl
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10 hours ago, Howl said:

Pakistan, Afghanistan and Nigeria still had polio cases as recently as four years ago, 

All three have current cases from this year (Pakistan and Afghanistan have wild cases while the Nigerian case is vaccine derived)

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No cases in my family but my mother told us how afraid everyone was and how they had no idea how it spread. She said people were afraid to go swimming. I've known people who were weakend in body by it's effects all their lives and in their senior years. 

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Mr. Briefly reminded me that his grandfather on his mom's side also had polio.  He died before we met, so everything I've heard about him is family story. But he sounds like he did not let it slow him down.  He was drafted but honorably discharged because one of his arms was basically useless.

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Two children in my small village school got polio. When the vaccine came out ,I was about 8, and my parents couldn't get me vaccinated fast enough. We didn't have anything to prevent whooping cough, measles, etc., but we got that, and we were grateful.

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I remember lining up with a bunch of other people at a community center to get a sugar cube with the polio vaccine on it.

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16 hours ago, Howl said:

Neighbor maybe 15 years ago did not vaccinate his young kids, until he got  a post-doc in the Middle East.  Then the entire family got the full sequence for everybody before leaving the US.  

Pakistan, Afghanistan and Nigeria still had polio cases as recently as four years ago, and health-care workers in Pakistan and Afghanistan attempting to vaccinate for polio are murdered periodically, as recently as January of this year.  At this point, more people are dying from trying to prevent polio in those countries than are dying or sickened from the disease.  Thanks, Taliban.  Google "health care workers vaccinating for polio killed in Afghanistan and Pakistan" and quite a few articles will come up. 

And thanks CIA, unfortunately. The US instituted a fake vaccination campaign in Pakistan as part of their efforts to find Bin Laden, and that played a huge role in sowing distrust of vaccines in the area.

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Kat is also vegan and without being a giant hypocrite, that wouldnt work out anyway.

Edited by RainbowSky
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I have a friend in her 70s who had polio as a child.  For many years it seemed that she’d survived without any significant long term effects, but it turned out that the effects were just delayed, and she has something referred to as post polio syndrome.  She’s doing pretty well now, but sometimes she needs to use a scooter instead of walking.

My father was a test subject in Jonas Salk’s vaccine trials.  I’m not sure if it was his entire elementary school that was involved, or just his class.  My dad said that Dr Salk actually gave the injections to all the kids in the class, instead of having a nurse or someone else give them.  Imagine how scared all of the parents must have been, to allow their children to be used in a medical experiment.  According to my dad, his parents were thrilled that he was getting the experimental vaccine.  I only learned about this part of my dad’s history recently, but I really wish I had known about it before his parents died.  I’d have loved to ask them about it.

11 minutes ago, Butterfly said:

I don’t understand the swimming pool parts. Does it spread through water? 

It’s spread through ingesting contaminated food and water, much like hepatitis A is spread.

a chlorinated swimming pool was probably pretty safe, but people didn’t know how it was being transmitted at the time.  

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5 hours ago, Butterfly said:

I don’t understand the swimming pool parts. Does it spread through water? 

It spreads through body fluids and fecal matter, I guess overcrowded and not properly sanitized swimming pools in the summer heat were the right evironment for it to reach a high number of people. Polio is an enterovirus that in 90% of cases is either asymptomatic or causes typical enterovirus symptoms. Unfortunately in the rest of cases it manages to pass into the bloodstream and into the Central Nervous System, of this cases only a quarter end up in a form of paralysis. So for every case of paralysis causing polio there are potentially thousands of contagious people more, who don't show symptoms other than maybe those of a banal enterovirus.

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19 hours ago, Butterfly said:

I don’t understand the swimming pool parts. Does it spread through water? 

I think that at one point that was the belief.  It was more that it spread in places like that because there were so many people gathered and it is so contagious.  My mother talked about how her parents thought it was a water-borne illness, too.  Eventually, groups were discouraged from gathering in larger numbers anywhere, not just at pools.  Or at least that's what she always said.  As with many diseases, especially in that time period, it wasn't really understood by the general public at first.

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