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Destiny

Trump 19: Please Cry for Us Montenegro (and We Are so Sorry!)

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Spent
Destiny

Continued from here:

 

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Aggravated
GreyhoundFan

Thank you @Destiny!

 

This is a new one -- so he stole another family's coat of arms. Why am I not surprised? "The Coat of Arms Said ‘Integrity.’ Now It Says ‘Trump.’"

Spoiler

LONDON — At the Trump National Golf Club outside Washington, which hosted the Senior P.G.A. Championship this weekend, the president’s coat of arms is everywhere — the sign out front, the pro shop, even the exercise room.

The regal emblem, used at President Trump’s golf courses across the United States, sports three lions and two chevrons on a shield, below a gloved hand gripping an arrow.

A different coat of arms flies over Mr. Trump’s two golf resorts in Scotland. The lions on the shield have been replaced by a two-headed eagle, an image the company has said represents the “dual nature and nationality” of Mr. Trump’s Scottish and German roots.

But this emblem was not just about honoring his heritage.

The British are known to take matters of heraldry seriously, and Mr. Trump’s American coat of arms belongs to another family. It was granted by British authorities in 1939 to Joseph Edward Davies, the third husband of Marjorie Merriweather Post, the socialite who built the Mar-a-Lago resort that is now Mr. Trump’s cherished getaway.

In the United States, the Trump Organization took Mr. Davies’s coat of arms for its own, making one small adjustment — replacing the word “Integritas,” Latin for integrity, with “Trump.”

Joseph D. Tydings, a Democrat and former United States senator from Maryland who is the grandson of Mr. Davies, learned that Mr. Trump was using the emblem, at least at Mar-a-Lago, when he visited the property. Mr. Trump had never asked permission.

“There are members of the family who wanted to sue him,” said Mr. Tydings, a lawyer who wears his family’s coat of arms on a ring. “This is the first I’ve ever heard about it being used anywhere else.”

Mr. Trump tried to bring the American version to Scotland a decade ago.

He used the emblem on promotional materials when he started marketing a new golf course development in Aberdeenshire, on Scotland’s east coast. But the materials ran afoul of the coat-of-arms authorities in Scotland — a uniquely British problem.

Mr. Trump hadn’t registered the emblem under the Lyon King of Arms Act passed by the Scottish Parliament in 1672. The Court of the Lord Lyon has jurisdiction over the use and misuse of coats of arms.

Back then, Mr. Trump also tried to trademark the emblem in Britain. But the application was rejected by the trademark office.

By 2012, when the golf course in Aberdeenshire opened, the new coat of arms had appeared. The same one is used at Mr. Trump’s course in Ayrshire, on Scotland’s west coast, which he bought in 2014. That year, Mr. Trump trademarked the redesigned emblem.

Britain’s trademark office would not initially acknowledge the earlier application by Mr. Trump. It provided a copy last month only after The New York Times made a Freedom of Information request, and would not say why the application was rejected, citing a law restricting its ability to release information.

he College of Arms, which oversees coats of arms in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, provided more detail. The emblem originally submitted in 2007 by Mr. Trump to Britain’s trademark office matched one that had been granted to Mr. Davies, an American of Welsh descent who once served as ambassador to the Soviet Union.

“It couldn’t be a clearer-cut case, actually,” said Clive Cheesman, one of the college’s heralds, who oversee coats of arms, their design and their use.

“A coat of arms that was originally granted to Joseph Edward Davies in 1939 by the English heraldic authority ended up being used 10 or 15 years ago by the Trump Organization as part of its branding for its golf clubs,” said Mr. Cheesman, a lawyer by training. “This got them into difficulty.”

The White House referred questions to the Trump Organization, which did not respond to requests for comment.

The organization has trademarked the Davies coat of arms in the United States, which has far less attachment to such symbols. It is used on the company’s website and is a prominent branding detail of Mr. Trump’s many American golf courses and resorts — emblazoned on golf balls, shirts and bottles of body lotion.

When the Trump Organization created a Civil War memorial at the golf course near Washington commemorating a battle and a “river of blood” that never occurred, a plaque marking the fictitious event was embossed with the coat of arms.

Mr. Tydings, 89, was close to Ms. Post, his step-grandmother, whom he referred to as “Mommy-da.” He spent much of his youth at Mar-a-Lago. His grandfather, Mr. Davies, was a lawyer and diplomat, also serving as ambassador to Belgium and as a special envoy for President Harry S. Truman.

Mr. Tydings, who still practices law, said that several years ago he talked some of his cousins out of suing Mr. Trump, because he knew it would be an endless and costly exercise.

“I just told the other members of my family that you can’t win on this,” he said. “You’ll borrow for two generations to sue him.”

“I know Trump very well,” he added. Mr. Tydings was a senior partner at Finley, Kumble, a giant firm in its day that represented Mr. Trump and other owners of the fledgling United States Football League in an unsuccessful suit against the N.F.L.

“I knew him and the way he operates,” Mr. Tydings said. “And the way he operates, you don’t sue Trump, because you’ll be in court for years and years and years.”

There is one historical parallel between Mr. Trump and Mr. Davies.

Both men were controversially pro-Russian. Mr. Davies, who played an important role as a go-between for President Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Soviets, has been criticized for being taken in by Stalin’s propaganda machine.

Mr. Tydings was asked what Ms. Post and his grandfather would make of Mr. Trump.

Ms. Post, he said, “would be pleased that everything is the same” at Mar-a-Lago, “except for the Trump name and portraits.”

His grandfather, he added, “would be rolling over in his grave to think he was using his crest.”

There are several pictures in the article.

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Wine time!
47of74

I see man baby is on his fake news kick again

http://www.kcrg.com/content/news/Trump-attacks-news-reports-on-son-in-law-Russia-424943594.html

Quote

The White House has been battered in recent days by a relentless stream of sourced reports about alleged Trump campaign contacts with Russia, and President Donald Trump is hitting back on Twitter.

Trump tweets that "it is my opinion that many of the leaks coming out of the White House are fabricated lies" from what he calls the "FakeNews media."

He says that "whenever you see the words 'sources say' in the fake news media, and they don't mention names ... it is very possible that those sources don't exist but are made up by fake news writers. #FakeNews is the enemy!"

Go fuck yourself Donald.

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onekidanddone

He has the best leaks the BEST.

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GreyhoundFan

"Trump’s trip: Conventional images and unconventional talk"

Spoiler

TAORMINA, Sicily — As he dashed through the Middle East and Europe, Donald Trump looked like a conventional American leader abroad. He solemnly laid a wreath at a Holocaust memorial in Jerusalem, had an audience with the pope at the Vatican and stood center stage with Western allies at the annual summits that dominate the diplomatic calendar.

But when Trump spoke, he sounded like anything but a typical U.S. president.

On his first overseas tour, the new president made no attempt to publicly promote democracy and human rights in Saudi Arabia, instead declaring that he wasn’t there to lecture. In Israel and the West Bank, he pointedly did not back America’s long-standing support for a two-state solution to the intractable peace process. And in the heart of Europe, Trump berated NATO allies over their financial commitments and would not explicitly endorse the “one for all, all for one” defense doctrine that has been the cornerstone of trans-Atlantic security for decades.

To the White House, Trump’s first trip abroad was an embodiment of the promises he made as a candidate to put America’s interests first and break through the guardrails that have long defined U.S. foreign policy. Trump advisers repeatedly described the trip as historic and groundbreaking, including one senior official who brashly said without evidence that Trump had “united the entire Muslim world.”

Addressing U.S. troops Saturday at a Sicilian air base moments before departing for Washington, Trump himself declared: “I think we hit a home run.”

Trump boarded Air Force One without having held a single news conference on the trip — a break in presidential precedent that allowed him to avoid facing tough questions about his foreign policy or the raging controversies involving the investigations into his campaign’s possible ties to Russia. Instead, the White House hoped to let the images of Trump in statesman-like settings tell the story of his first trip abroad, and perhaps ease questions about his preparedness for the delicate world of international diplomacy.

Yet those questions are sure to persist, particularly given Trump’s remarkable lashing of NATO allies in Brussels. Standing alongside his counterparts, the president effectively accused countries who do not meet NATO’s goal of spending 2 percent of their gross domestic product of sponging off American taxpayers. He left some allies, already nervous about Russia’s saber-rattling and Trump’s public affection for Russian President Vladimir Putin, further flummoxed when he ended his remarks without making an explicit statement of support for Article 5, the common defense clause that underpins the 68-year-old military alliance.

“The mood of Article 5, the idea that we are all in this together, is not the mood he conveyed,” said Jon Alterman, a senior vice president at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington. “The mood he conveyed is you guys are a bunch of freeloaders.”

Some European leaders believe Trump can still be coaxed away from his controversial campaign positions. At the Group of 7 summit in the coastal town of Taormina, leaders launched an aggressive, behind-the-scenes campaign to get him to stay in the Paris climate accord.

While Trump emerged from the summit without a final decision on the Paris pact, he declared in a tweet Saturday that he will make a final decision next week.

Trump’s return home also shifts attention back to the storm clouds of scandal hovering over the White House. In a briefing with reporters Saturday, White House officials shifted uncomfortably and refused to comment when asked about reports that Jared Kushner, Trump’s son-in-law and senior adviser, tried to set up secret communications with Russia after the election.

Trump’s nine-day, five-stop international tour resulted in few tangible policy achievements. The U.S. inked a $110 billion arms sale to Saudi Arabia and unveiled numerous business commitments in the region, though the White House never provided specific details about the scope of the agreements. At NATO, the White House touted the alliance’s commitment to boosting defense spending, though the resolution was essentially a continuation of a pact agreed to two years earlier.

Still, the trip offered the clearest picture to date of how Trump plans to put his imprint on America’s relationship with the world.

From the start, he set a new direction. Instead of following presidential tradition by making his international debut in a neighboring democracy like Canada or Mexico, Trump flew to Saudi Arabia, the repressive desert kingdom.

He appeared particularly comfortable in the setting. In Riyadh, he received a lavish, gold-plated welcome: His image was projected across the facade of the luxury hotel where he stayed, horses flanked his motorcade as it moved to one of the king’s desert palaces and an extravagant celebration was held in his honor, complete with a traditional Saudi sword dance.

Trump betrayed no awkwardness at relishing the warm embrace of one of the world’s most oppressive governments. Instead, he reciprocated with a pledge to not publicly chastise the ruling royal family for its crackdown on political dissent.

“We are not here to lecture — we are not here to tell other people how to live, what to do, who to be, or how to worship,” Trump said.

Trump was lavishly feted in Israel as well, embraced by a prime minister who despised his predecessor and was eager to flatter the new president. Trump received multiple standing ovations — one of his favorite measures of success — during a speech on U.S. relations with Israel. The photo of his solemn visit to the Western Wall was splashed across the front pages of Israel’s newspapers.

Like many of his predecessors, Trump made a personal appeal for peace between Israelis and Palestinians. But he never uttered the words “two-state solution,” the longtime U.S. policy plan that would create a separate homeland for Palestinians. He also made no mention of new Jewish settlements in the West Bank, a major point of contention for the Palestinians.

The smaller moments of the president’s trip were endlessly dissected as well, from first lady Melania Trump’s apparent reluctance to hold her husband’s hand on occasion to his shoving aside of Montenegro’s prime minister to get to the front of a pack of leaders at a NATO photo opportunity. At the G-7, it was Trump’s interactions with other leaders that commanded attention.

The six other heads of state took a short walk from one event to the next, chatting convivially as they strolled through the narrow Sicilian streets. Trump hung back, deciding against joining his peers.

Instead, he got in a golf cart and the American president’s mini-motorcade drove the route alone, Trump once more having charted his own course.

I'm still appalled by how he acted on this trip.

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Spent
Destiny
He has the best leaks the BEST.

Tremendous leaks!

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onekidanddone
14 minutes ago, GreyhoundFan said:

"Trump’s trip: Conventional images and unconventional talk"

  Reveal hidden contents

TAORMINA, Sicily — As he dashed through the Middle East and Europe, Donald Trump looked like a conventional American leader abroad. He solemnly laid a wreath at a Holocaust memorial in Jerusalem, had an audience with the pope at the Vatican and stood center stage with Western allies at the annual summits that dominate the diplomatic calendar.

But when Trump spoke, he sounded like anything but a typical U.S. president.

On his first overseas tour, the new president made no attempt to publicly promote democracy and human rights in Saudi Arabia, instead declaring that he wasn’t there to lecture. In Israel and the West Bank, he pointedly did not back America’s long-standing support for a two-state solution to the intractable peace process. And in the heart of Europe, Trump berated NATO allies over their financial commitments and would not explicitly endorse the “one for all, all for one” defense doctrine that has been the cornerstone of trans-Atlantic security for decades.

To the White House, Trump’s first trip abroad was an embodiment of the promises he made as a candidate to put America’s interests first and break through the guardrails that have long defined U.S. foreign policy. Trump advisers repeatedly described the trip as historic and groundbreaking, including one senior official who brashly said without evidence that Trump had “united the entire Muslim world.”

Addressing U.S. troops Saturday at a Sicilian air base moments before departing for Washington, Trump himself declared: “I think we hit a home run.”

Trump boarded Air Force One without having held a single news conference on the trip — a break in presidential precedent that allowed him to avoid facing tough questions about his foreign policy or the raging controversies involving the investigations into his campaign’s possible ties to Russia. Instead, the White House hoped to let the images of Trump in statesman-like settings tell the story of his first trip abroad, and perhaps ease questions about his preparedness for the delicate world of international diplomacy.

Yet those questions are sure to persist, particularly given Trump’s remarkable lashing of NATO allies in Brussels. Standing alongside his counterparts, the president effectively accused countries who do not meet NATO’s goal of spending 2 percent of their gross domestic product of sponging off American taxpayers. He left some allies, already nervous about Russia’s saber-rattling and Trump’s public affection for Russian President Vladimir Putin, further flummoxed when he ended his remarks without making an explicit statement of support for Article 5, the common defense clause that underpins the 68-year-old military alliance.

“The mood of Article 5, the idea that we are all in this together, is not the mood he conveyed,” said Jon Alterman, a senior vice president at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington. “The mood he conveyed is you guys are a bunch of freeloaders.”

Some European leaders believe Trump can still be coaxed away from his controversial campaign positions. At the Group of 7 summit in the coastal town of Taormina, leaders launched an aggressive, behind-the-scenes campaign to get him to stay in the Paris climate accord.

While Trump emerged from the summit without a final decision on the Paris pact, he declared in a tweet Saturday that he will make a final decision next week.

Trump’s return home also shifts attention back to the storm clouds of scandal hovering over the White House. In a briefing with reporters Saturday, White House officials shifted uncomfortably and refused to comment when asked about reports that Jared Kushner, Trump’s son-in-law and senior adviser, tried to set up secret communications with Russia after the election.

Trump’s nine-day, five-stop international tour resulted in few tangible policy achievements. The U.S. inked a $110 billion arms sale to Saudi Arabia and unveiled numerous business commitments in the region, though the White House never provided specific details about the scope of the agreements. At NATO, the White House touted the alliance’s commitment to boosting defense spending, though the resolution was essentially a continuation of a pact agreed to two years earlier.

Still, the trip offered the clearest picture to date of how Trump plans to put his imprint on America’s relationship with the world.

From the start, he set a new direction. Instead of following presidential tradition by making his international debut in a neighboring democracy like Canada or Mexico, Trump flew to Saudi Arabia, the repressive desert kingdom.

He appeared particularly comfortable in the setting. In Riyadh, he received a lavish, gold-plated welcome: His image was projected across the facade of the luxury hotel where he stayed, horses flanked his motorcade as it moved to one of the king’s desert palaces and an extravagant celebration was held in his honor, complete with a traditional Saudi sword dance.

Trump betrayed no awkwardness at relishing the warm embrace of one of the world’s most oppressive governments. Instead, he reciprocated with a pledge to not publicly chastise the ruling royal family for its crackdown on political dissent.

“We are not here to lecture — we are not here to tell other people how to live, what to do, who to be, or how to worship,” Trump said.

Trump was lavishly feted in Israel as well, embraced by a prime minister who despised his predecessor and was eager to flatter the new president. Trump received multiple standing ovations — one of his favorite measures of success — during a speech on U.S. relations with Israel. The photo of his solemn visit to the Western Wall was splashed across the front pages of Israel’s newspapers.

Like many of his predecessors, Trump made a personal appeal for peace between Israelis and Palestinians. But he never uttered the words “two-state solution,” the longtime U.S. policy plan that would create a separate homeland for Palestinians. He also made no mention of new Jewish settlements in the West Bank, a major point of contention for the Palestinians.

The smaller moments of the president’s trip were endlessly dissected as well, from first lady Melania Trump’s apparent reluctance to hold her husband’s hand on occasion to his shoving aside of Montenegro’s prime minister to get to the front of a pack of leaders at a NATO photo opportunity. At the G-7, it was Trump’s interactions with other leaders that commanded attention.

The six other heads of state took a short walk from one event to the next, chatting convivially as they strolled through the narrow Sicilian streets. Trump hung back, deciding against joining his peers.

Instead, he got in a golf cart and the American president’s mini-motorcade drove the route alone, Trump once more having charted his own course.

I'm still appalled by how he acted on this trip.

I am NOT amused.

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candygirl200413

Slightly off-topic: Went running in my very liberal neighborhood when I was coming towards the end and I saw an uncommon flatbed truck that had a deplorable driving in here sticker and I was just absolutely over it. I'm in awe with how annoying it is that many of them will not be phased that he acted embarrassing and horrible during this international trip. 

Also I'm mad more people aren't talking about how we basically have no allies now, like our terrified meter should be huge.

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faraway
23 minutes ago, candygirl200413 said:

Also I'm mad more people aren't talking about how we basically have no allies now, like our terrified meter should be huge.

Don't say that, the Saudis seemed down for a bromance.

@JMarie I swear you posted while I was typing and I only saw it after. :pb_lol: Looks like everyone needs a bromance.

Love the one between J&E!

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onekidanddone

I live in a very liberal county.  Went to the Walgreen's a while back and a huge ass truck was parked outside with a you know who sticker on the back window. I waited until he left the store before  I went in.  

38 minutes ago, JMarie said:

The only person who wants a bromance with Trump is Trump. He has huge ass portraits of himself every place he lives.

Edited by onekidanddone

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47of74

 

1 hour ago, onekidanddone said:

I live in a very liberal county.  Went to the Walgreen's a while back and a huge ass truck was parked outside with a you know who sticker on the back window. I waited until he left the store before  I went in.  

The only person who wants a bromance with Trump is Trump. He has huge ass portraits of himself every place he lives.

I just had a horrible mental image of Agent Orange trying Autofellatio on himself.

And now he's blocking people on Twitter who hurt his fee fees...

http://www.palmerreport.com/politics/block-twitter-trump/3132/

Quote

At the end of a week which saw him humiliate himself on the world stage and his scandals deepen to include members of his own family, Donald Trump doesn’t appear to be handling the pressure well. On Sunday evening, shortly after complaining about how his tweets are portrayed, Trump began blocking people on Twitter who were making fun of his tweets.

The first victim we’ve been able to document of Trump’s Sunday night Twitter massacre was comedic writer Bess Kalb, who tweeted the following at 8:36pm eastern time:

 

Or his lawyers/family are doing it to keep him from having a fit.

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GreyhoundFan

Wait, what?  "Trump calls for more spending on health care so it’s ‘the best anywhere,’ but he just proposed big cuts"

Spoiler

President Trump on Sunday evening called for more spending on health care and said his plan to overhaul the tax code “is actually ahead of schedule,” two statements that are at odds with the budget proposal he unveiled just last week.

The statements came as part of a blizzard of Twitter posts the president made after he returned from his first foreign trip.

While he was gone, Trump's top advisers rolled out his first comprehensive budget plan. They spent days explaining the plan to the media and to Congress, but Trump did not weigh in last week. This was unusual, as the budgets submitted by presidents in their first year in office tend to represent the most complete portrait of their agenda and legislative priorities.

Trump's budget plan, assembled by White House Office of Management and budget director Mick Mulvaney, called for cuts of between $800 billion and $1.4 trillion in future spending on Medicaid, the health-care program for low-income Americans. It also called for cuts in future spending on a health-care program for low-income children. It did not propose new health-care spending, as Trump alluded to in one of his Twitter posts Sunday evening.

... <tweet from twitler>

In the Twitter post, Trump does not differentiate whether the new “dollars” should be added to private health programs or public-health programs. His budget did not propose significant changes or cuts to Medicare, the large, government-run health-care program for Americans who are older than 65. During the campaign, Trump promised not to pursue cuts to Medicare or Medicaid if he became president.

By calling for more health spending in a Twitter post, Trump could be distancing himself from the substantial blowback that his budget proposal received. Many Democrats expressed outrage at the proposed cuts to Medicaid, and several Republicans said they planned to ignore his call for cuts to the low-income health plan for children, known by the acronym CHIP.

Trump's Twitter post about his tax plan being ahead of schedule comes just days after Mulvaney and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin gave much different descriptions of the plan to Congress. Trump has offered a one-page blueprint for how he wants an overhaul of the tax code to look. He wants a major cut in tax rates and a simplification of the system.

,,,<another incoherent tweet from twitler>

Mnuchin, Trump and Vice President Pence have described their tax agenda as a huge tax cut, but Mulvaney has said the lower tax rates would be offset by eliminating tax breaks and deductions. This differentiation suggests they still have major work to do — and issues to settle — before they can try to cut a deal with lawmakers. They also have not decided whether they want to pursue a long-term overhaul of the tax code or a temporary cut.

Trump's tweet may overstate what he has achieved in other ways, too. White House officials were not prepared to make any tax outline public until he prodded them to do so as he neared his first 100 days in office.  What's more, the plan wasn't formally “submitted” to Congress. It was released on a single sheet of paper and included only a handful of numbers, leaving lawmakers and congressional aides to question what direction the White House wanted the tax plan to go in.

Mnuchin had set an initial goal of completing an overhaul of the tax code by August, but the White House has backed away from that time frame. Most recently, Trump's top advisers have said they want the changes to pass Congress sometime in 2017, while some congressional Republicans have said a more realistic timetable would shoot for an agreement by sometime next year.

Still, the White House has not proposed a comprehensive tax plan, and Trump did not include any new details of a tax overhaul in last week's budget proposal. The House and Senate have also not completed a tax plan, or even proposed one that has passed through committee.

Trump's top advisers are meeting frequently with lawmakers about ways to overhaul the tax code, however, and it seems to be one area where the White House is most engaged with lawmakers from both parties. Democrats have publicly chided the Trump administration for the scant details it has offered on tax changes, but they have agreed to meet with Mnuchin and others behind closed doors to hear their thoughts.

Trump has said there are many different paths for changing the tax code. He could try to do it with only GOP support, or he could try to lure Democrats into a bargain by pairing changes with major spending on infrastructure projects.

Good grief. Someone needs to take his phone and flush it down the toilet.

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Giddy
AmericanRose

I really don't think organization is this adminstration's strong suit. Of course, I guess it's hard for the left hand to talk to the right hand when the left hand is constantly changing its mind....

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fraurosena
2 hours ago, GreyhoundFan said:

Good grief. Someone needs to take his phone and flush it down the toilet.

Goodness, no! Let him please keep tweeting.

Not for our entertainment (although we all laugh our heads off everytime his tiny fingers tweet away), but for the phenomenal insight his tweets give into his unhinged psyche. It's evidence of his idiocy, his lies, his alternative facts. And those tweets contribute to the evidence we need in order to finally take him down. :pb_wink:

 

 

 

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fraurosena

This is sickening.

Here’s What the GOP Bill Does to Obamacare’s ‘Essential Health Benefits’

Spoiler

Maternity care. Mental health. Dentist visits for kids. States trying to save money on health insurance are likely to ask to cut these and other services if the latest version of the GOP's health reform bill becomes law, the Congressional Budget Office found.

The CBO's analysis of the American Health Care Act breaks out how many states are likely to seek permission to stop requiring health insurance companies to offer coverage of all of the "essential health benefits" — the list of medical services that must be offered now under the Affordable Care Act.

"In particular, out-of-pocket spending on maternity care and mental health and substance abuse services could increase by thousands of dollars in a given year," according to the CBO report released Wednesday.

Bare-bones policies that don't cover these conditions will certainly be cheaper, the CBO said. But only for people who don't need them covered. Everyone else is likely to be priced out of the market, the non-partisan group said.

"The CBO … confirmed that by allowing states to opt out of the Essential Health Benefits, patients would be left with inadequate coverage that will not suffice for patients when they need it most," said Harold Wimmer, CEO of the American Lung Association.

"The Affordable Care Act is not perfect but any changes to current law should prioritize preventing disease and preserving healthcare coverage for all Americans — regardless of income or pre-existing conditions," he added.

"CBO has confirmed what the March of Dimes and other advocates have been saying for weeks: Women and their families will pay higher costs and receive less coverage, especially for maternity care, under the American Health Care Act," Stacey Stewart, president of the March of Dimes, which funds research to prevent birth defects, said.

"People living in states modifying the essential health benefits who used services or benefits no longer included in the essential health benefits would experience substantial increases in out-of-pocket spending on health care or would choose to forgo the services," the CBO said.

"Services or benefits likely to be excluded from the essential health benefits in some states include maternity care, mental health and substance abuse benefits, rehabilitative and habilitative services, and pediatric dental benefits."

This version of the AHCA was particularly difficult for the CBO to analyze, because it leaves many options open to states, which are the final regulators of health insurance.

The CBO predicted states where about half of all Americans live would keep the essential benefits requirements, which are very popular with American voters who had tired of insurance companies that refused to cover pre-existing conditions and that capped coverage.

In those states, premiums are likely to go down a little, the CBO projected.

But other states are likely to seek waivers that would let insurance companies charge more for some care, and charge older people much more than they charge younger people, the CBO said.

And some people who need, for instance, expensive drugs could end up paying huge amounts out of pocket if states let insurance companies impose lifetime caps — currently banned by Obamacare.

In states where about a sixth of the population lives, the CBO economists projected, coverage would become pricey as insurance companies went back to the practice of charging far more for pre-existing conditions and far more for older people.

"Over time, it would become more difficult for less healthy people (including people with preexisting medical conditions) in those states to purchase insurance because their premiums would continue to increase rapidly," the CBO said.

Seeing this atrocity and the proposed tax-overhaul, pared with the evisceration of many executive departments like Education and EPA, I think Ann Reid captured what is being perpetrated by the DOH quite eloquently: 

"This is a War on the Poor."

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Howl
Quote

In the United States, the Trump Organization took Mr. Davies’s coat of arms for its own, making one small adjustment — replacing the word “Integritas,” Latin for integrity, with “Trump.”

Why am I not surprised?  This perfectly illustrates everything about who he is. 

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AlwaysExcited

 

9 hours ago, fraurosena said:

Women and their families will pay higher costs and receive less coverage, especially for maternity care, under the American Health Care Act,

Ok, I don't get this. 

In my country, the most homophobic, most anti-choice and most pro-"traditional family" people are VERY into free maternal care, long maternity leaves and other things that make life easier for new parents. That's only good thing I can say about these people. Apparently, American conservatives don't have even that. 
WTF? 

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47of74

And apparently Orange Julius flipped off the Italian leader;

 

http://bipartisanreport.com/2017/05/29/trump-caught-on-camera-flipping-middle-finger-to-world-leader-internet-erupts/

 

Quote

For as long as there have been rude gestures throughout the history of time, children seeking some form of rebellion have done their best to use them while still disguising the usage to stay out of trouble. The same applies to the orange commander-in-chief of the United States.

In a video tweeted by @Politics_PR, it’s been revealed that the man representing the United States flipped off the Italian Prime Minister.

 

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Giddy
AmericanRose
37 minutes ago, AlwaysExcited said:

 

Ok, I don't get this. 

In my country, the most homophobic, most anti-choice and most pro-"traditional family" people are VERY into free maternal care, long maternity leaves and other things that make life easier for new parents. That's only good thing I can say about these people. Apparently, American conservatives don't have even that. 
WTF? 

I don't get it either. I seriously think they want only the 1% and the poorest in the country having kids, because that's the only way their thought process makes any (scary) sense. But of course, the 1% can afford anything, and the poorest are the ones unlikely to have the money or the education to avoid pregnancy. But of course, the 1%'ers will need workers...!

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Wine time!
47of74

Oh geezus, man baby is not helping...

http://www.newsweek.com/trump-raged-abbas-bethlehem-meeting-you-lied-me-617030

Quote

President Trump reportedly lashed out at Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas in their meeting in the West Bank city of Bethlehem last Tuesday.

“You tricked me in D.C.! You talked there about your commitment to peace, but the Israelis showed me your involvement in incitement [against Israel],” he allegedly said to Abbas, according to Israel’s Channel 2 broadcaster, which cited a U.S. official present at the meeting. It said the Palestinian delegation were shocked by the outburst.

The Israeli government blames the Palestinian leadership and Abbas’s Fatah faction for inciting violence among young Palestinians, who from September 2015 onward launched a series of violent and deadly attacks with knives, guns and vehicles in Jerusalem and the West Bank. The Palestinians say it is Israel’s military occupation of East Jerusalem and the West Bank that pushed them to violence. The violence slowed in mid-2016.

 

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onekidanddone
48 minutes ago, 47of74 said:

That region has been warring for centuries, yet some how Orange shit for brains is going to bigly fix it.

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fraurosena

Well, we all know that the tangerine toddler can't stand still for more than a few seconds, but how disrespectful to actually start dancing! What does he think, that he's still in Saudi Arabia or something?

Well, at least he remembered to keep his hand on his chest, so that's something... 

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Depressed
formergothardite

You can tell in that video when he gets to parts where he doesn't know the words. He'll stop singing and then pick back up. 

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fraurosena
45 minutes ago, formergothardite said:

You can tell in that video when he gets to parts where he doesn't know the words. He'll stop singing and then pick back up. 

So weird though, the parts he doesn't know seem to be the most well-known in the world. How hard is it to remember "the land of the free and the home of the brave"?  But no, he falls silent midsong,  and then you see him mouth "freeeeeee", he falls silent again and then he mouths "braaaaaaave". :pb_rollseyes:

 

Edited by fraurosena
typo

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