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iweartanktops

Alternative Facts with Kellyanne Conway

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GreyhoundFan

"The truest thing Kellyanne Conway has said"

Spoiler

Right after “Reliable Sources” host Brian Stelter finished up his interview with Special Envoy to CNN Kellyanne Conway, his panel got to work quantifying the lies/falsehoods uttered by the Trump aide. Said CNN global affairs analyst (and Washington Post columnist) Max Boot: “She says there’s no evidence of collusion. In fact, there’s a lot of evidence of collusion.… She says the Democrats walked away from the DACA [Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals] deal. That’s not true. Trump walked away from it. She says that Trump is not trying to tear down news outlets, and yet he tears down news outlets every single day with a fake news tags and trying to take away Amazon’s deal with the Postal Service.”

There was one line of Conway analysis, however, that will survive the green-shaded gaze of the country’s most nitpicky fact-checkers. It relates to cable TV news. Springboarding off reporting about how Fox News host Sean Hannity speaks with President Trump all the time, Stelter asked Conway, “You know, there were these stories recently about Sean Hannity as a shadow chief of staff, or shadow comms director. I was wondering if you and Hannity ever coordinate. Can you tell us about that?”

Of course she can!

No, said Conway, she doesn’t coordinate with Hannity. But: “I have a relationship with the president. I speak with him regularly. Sean is running the highest-rated show on cable. And I think there’s a reason for that. He’s providing information that people can’t find anywhere else,” said Conway. “Sean would have low ratings if he was talking about everything else that everybody is talking about. Think about that for a moment. People are starved for unique content, and they seem to not be getting it elsewhere. I think his ratings show that and what he covers every night show that.”

Yes, Hannity is, in fact, providing information that people can’t get from such places as CNN and NBC News and CBS News and the like. The Seth Rich conspiracy is just one example of such information. The steady undermining of the FBI is another example. He has promoted others on Twitter and on his radio show.

Those sub-conspiracy theories feed into the grand conspiracy theory that Hannity has been spouting for the benefit of Trump. Don’t ask the Erik Wemple Blog to abridge it; Hannity routinely does a just-fine job of that on his various platforms. “A soft coup is under way right here in the United States of America in an attempt to overturn November’s election results and forcibly remove a duly elected president from office,” he said nearly a year ago. “Sinister forces quickly aligning in what is becoming now, in my mind, a clear and present danger.”

Here’s where Conway nails it: Other outlets, indeed, don’t discuss this “soft coup.” That’s because they don’t see the evidence for it, and because they refuse to trash our country’s institutions for the sake of access, and because they’re unwilling to exchange their credibility for the ratings of “Hannity.” As Pew Research Center reported in 2017, 4 in 10 Trump voters cited Fox News as their main source of news about the 2016 campaign; Clinton voters showed no such brand allegiance. So the audience dynamic cited by Conway is a bit more complicated than she suggested.

Fitting that this endorsement of “Hannity” content would emerge from the popularizer of the term “alternative facts.”

 

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GreyhoundFan

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AmazonGrace

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GreyhoundFan

K-Con's hubby is at it again: "George Conway, lawyer and husband of Kellyanne, rebuts Trump on constitutionality of special counsel"

Spoiler

On the morning of his 500th day in office, June 4, the president had a lot on his mind. Amid a string of tweets touting his greatest accomplishments and bemoaning the plight of farmers — who he said have been treated “unfairly” by Canada, China and Mexico — President Trump turned his attention to special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s Russia investigation.

“The appointment of the Special Councel is totally UNCONSTITUTIONAL!” Trump wrote. “Despite that, we play the game because I, unlike the Democrats, have done nothing wrong!” (The spelling was later corrected.)

On Monday evening, George Conway, a conservative lawyer, published a 3,500-word essay in which he called Trump’s tweet a “meritless legal position” rooted in an assumption from a conservative legal scholar that is “uncomplicatedly, flatly wrong.”

“The ‘constitutional’ arguments made against the special counsel … have little more rigor than the tweet that promoted them,” Conway wrote. “Such a lack of rigor, sadly, has been a disturbing trend in much of the politically charged public discourse about the law lately, and one that lawyers — regardless of their politics — owe a duty to abjure.”

Conway’s essay was notable not just for its analysis but for its venue, Lawfare, a highly regarded legal blog that has featured some of the strongest expert critiques of Trump’s conduct as president — and also for its author, a respected lawyer who happens to be married to one of Trump’s most visible advisers, Kellyanne Conway.

George Conway started his law career in New York and gained recognition in Republican circles after secretly assisting lawyers for Paula Jones in her sexual harassment lawsuit against President Bill Clinton, the case that precipitated the Monica Lewinsky scandal. Although this is not the first time Conway has criticized Trump, his essay, titled “The Terrible Arguments Against the Constitutionality of the Mueller Investigation,” went well beyond his previous “sub-tweets” subtly targeting the president.

Trump provided no rationale for his view, Conway noted. “It isn’t very surprising to see the president tweet a meritless legal position, because, as a non-lawyer, he wouldn’t know the difference between a good one and a bad one,” Conway wrote.

Conway, who at one point was reportedly under consideration to lead the civil division within the Justice Department, speculated that Trump got the idea that Mueller’s appointment was unconstitutional from the legal scholar Steven Calabresi, a professor at Northwestern University’s Pritzker School of Law and a co-founder of the Federalist Society.

In a “legal opinion” and in a commentary for the Wall Street Journal, Calabresi argued that Mueller’s appointment by Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein violated the appointments clause of the Constitution. The clause requires presidential appointment of “Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, Judges of the Supreme Court, and all other Officers of the United States” — except “inferior officers,” who may be chosen as “as Congress thinks proper.”

Calabresi’s argument rests on the distinction between “principal officers” and those “inferior officers.” Claiming that Mueller has “too much power for an inferior officer to have,” Calabresi argues that Mueller could have been appointed only by the president. Because he was not, his actions are unconstitutional, Calabresi contends.

“Unfortunately for the president,” Conway wrote, “these writings are no more correct than the spelling in his original tweet.”

Calabresi relies heavily on a 1988 Supreme Court decision in Morrison v. Olson that upheld a post-Watergate procedure for appointing an “independent counsel.” The case law required that, to qualify as an inferior officer, the independent counsel must have bosses who can remove them and hold them to “certain, limited duties.” Calabresi argues that Mueller meets none of those criteria, even though Rosenstein is Mueller’s supervisor and can remove him.

Using the indictment of Trump’s former campaign manager Paul Manafort as an example of how Mueller has exceeded his authority, Calabresi wrote in the Journal, “That’s too much power for an inferior officer to have. Only a principal officer, such as a U.S. attorney, can behave the way Mr. Mueller is behaving. Mr. Mueller is much more powerful today than any of the 96 U.S. attorneys.”

Conway said Calabresi’s claim rests on a “badly mistaken premise” — starting with the fact that courts have said U.S. attorneys are inferior officers, he said. Even though they are by law typically appointed by the president, Congress allowed for temporary appointments of acting U.S. attorneys, Conway noted. U.S. district courts can appoint U.S. attorneys as well when temporary appointments run out.

Additionally, Conway wrote, the scope of Mueller’s investigation is far narrower compared to the wide-ranging duties of U.S. attorneys. And although Calabresi argued that Manafort’s indictment is far beyond that scope, Conway said an appeals court already has rejected that argument.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit ruled last month that Mueller’s prosecution of Manafort on charges of money laundering, tax and bank fraud, and conspiracy was “an appropriate exercise of the Special Counsel’s authority” — and said that Mueller “would have been remiss” if he ignored “such an obvious link” between the Trump campaign and Russia.

“So not only does Mueller have a boss, and not only is the boss keeping tabs on Mueller, but, according to this judicial decision, Mueller is also faithfully following his boss’s orders,” Conway wrote. “That disposes of Calabresi’s Appointment Clause contentions.”

This and other legal arguments may not ever reach the Supreme Court. In fact, they are aimed at a different audience: the public and members of Congress who hold the power of impeachment. In the event that Mueller’s investigation leads to an impeachment proposal, Republican supporters of the president will be looking to discredit the inquiry as a way to head it off.

Trump’s personal attorney, Rudolph W. Giuliani, has stopped short of calling Mueller’s appointment “unconstitutional.” But he has called it “illegitimate,” arguing that “illegal” leaked memos from former FBI director James B. Comey and reports that an FBI informant communicated with Trump’s campaign in 2016 became the basis of Mueller’s appointment.

In Kellyanne Conway’s attempts to raise questions about the Mueller investigation, she said on May 29 on Fox News Channel that talk of any collusion with the Russians is “phony” because “collusion doesn’t even have legal significance.”

Conway has been asked on CNN in the past about her husband’s starkly differing opinions about Trump. She responded indignantly, accusing CNN’s Dana Bash of seeking to “harass and embarrass” her and saying she would not have asked a man the same question.

“We’re now going to talk about people’s spouses or significant others just because they work in the White House or at CNN?” Conway told her. “You just went there. CNN just went there.”

 

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Howl

I just came to post that exact thing with those exact words!  Kellyanne acted all *how DARE you even ask me that*  when someone legitimately challenged her over George's tweets the last time.  I could say she acted like a whiny little b, but I DO endeavor to maintain a high moral tone in my posts.  

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GreyhoundFan

Awww, K-Con got her fee fees hurt. "From Kellyanne Conway to Stephen Miller, Trump’s advisers face taunts from hecklers around D.C."

Spoiler

Just after arriving in Washington to work for President Trump, Kellyanne Conway found herself in a downtown supermarket, where a man rushing by with his shopping cart sneered, “You ought to be ashamed of yourself! Go look in the mirror!”

“Mirrors are in aisle 9 — I’ll go get one now,” Conway recalled replying. She brushed off the dart with the swagger of someone raised in the ever-attitudinal trenches of South Jersey. “What am I gonna do? Fall apart in the canned vegetable aisle?”

For any new presidential team, the challenges of adapting to Washington include navigating a capital with its own unceasing rhythms and high-pitched atmospherics, not to mention a maze of madness-inducing traffic circles.

Yet for employees of Donald J. Trump — the most singularly combative president of the modern era, a man who exists in his own tweet-driven ecosystem — the challenges are magnified exponentially, particularly in a predominantly Democratic city where he won only 4 percent of the vote.

For as long as the White House has existed, its star occupants have inspired a voluble mix of demonstrations, insults and satire. On occasion, protesters have besieged the homes of presidential underlings, such as Karl Rove, George W. Bush’s political strategist, who once looked out his living room window to find several hundred protesters on his lawn.

Yet what distinguishes the Trump era’s turbulence is the sheer number of his deputies — many of them largely anonymous before his inauguration — who have become the focus of planned and sometimes spontaneous public fury.

“Better be better!” a stranger shouted at Stephen Miller, a senior Trump adviser and the architect of his zero-tolerance immigration policy, as he walked through Dupont Circle a few months ago. Miller’s visage subsequently appeared on “Wanted” posters someone placed on lampposts ringing his City Center apartment building.

One night, after Miller ordered $80 of takeout sushi from a restaurant near his apartment, a bartender followed him into the street and shouted, “Stephen!” When Miller turned around, the bartender raised both middle fingers and cursed at him, according to an account Miller has shared with White House colleagues.

Outraged, Miller threw the sushi away, he later told his colleagues.

On Saturday, as Stephen K. Bannon, Trump’s former strategist, browsed at an antiquarian bookstore in Richmond, a woman in the shop called him a “piece of trash.” The woman left after Nick Cooke, owner of Black Swan Books, told her he would call the police.

“We are a bookshop. Bookshops are all about ideas and tolerating different opinions and not about verbally assaulting somebody, which is what was happening,” Cooke told the Richmond Times-Dispatch, which first reported the incident.

“Steve Bannon was simply standing, looking at books, minding his own business,” Cooke told the paper.

While he was a part of the president’s team, Bannon dealt with life in Washington, a city he freely described as enemy territory, by hiring security and rarely venturing out in public. When Bannon traveled, it was usually aboard a private plane.

For a time, a sign on the front steps of his Capitol Hill address read, “STOP.”

Most of the interactions that Trump’s well-known aides have with strangers amount to nothing more than posing for selfies. But his advisers have also found themselves subjected to a string of embarrassing public spankings, a litany that began even before he took office.

Before Vice President Pence’s swearing-in, his neighbors in Chevy Chase, where he was renting a house, hung rainbow banners to protest his opposition to equal rights for gay men and lesbians. When Pence went to the musical “Hamilton” in New York, the actor playing Aaron Burr concluded the evening by announcing from the stage that he was afraid that Trump wouldn’t “uphold our inalienable rights.”

A White House reporter, once on the phone with Sean Spicer while the then-press secretary was standing in his yard in Alexandria, said he could hear a passing motorist shouting curses at him. By then, Spicer had become a regular inspiration for mockery on “Saturday Night Live,” along with Trump, Conway, and Bannon.

Spicer said he spent his free time at home in those days because he didn’t want to deal with strangers’ interruptions — friendly or not.

“We were very deliberate about what we did and where we went because of the increasing notoriety,” Spicer said. “When we went out, the goal was not to make a spectacle.”

More recently, Trump appointees have starred in a flurry of in-your-face encounters that ricochet around social media for days on end.

A week ago, it was a Sidwell Friends teacher who interrupted her lunch at Teaism in Penn Quarter to tell Scott Pruitt — eating with an aide a few feet away — that he should resign as head of the Environmental Protection Agency.

By last Thursday morning, nearly half a million viewers had clicked on a video of the confrontation that the teacher, Kristin Mink, had posted on Facebook. By late Thursday afternoon, Pruitt quit.

“I would say it’s burning people out,” said Anthony Scaramucci, Trump’s former communications director. “I just think there’s so much meanness, it’s causing some level of, ‘What do I need this for?’ And I think it’s a recruiting speed bump for the administration. To be part of it, you’ve got to deal with the incoming of some of this viciousness.”

On at least two occasions, demonstrators have assembled outside the Kalorama home of Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner. Both like to attend early-morning spin classes at Flywheel, a nearby studio, where the room goes dark when the class starts — the better to pedal unobserved.

At the conclusion of a recent session, Kushner, a baseball cap pulled down over his face, headed quickly outside to a chauffeur-driven SUV that whisked him away.

'Shame!'

The president himself leads a cloistered existence, never visiting a restaurant or golf club other than the ones he owns or controls. Reared in New York’s indelicate political culture, Trump does not like to appear meek, using rallies and his Twitter account to lacerate rivals.

In recent weeks, say senior administration officials, Trump has voiced dissatisfaction with aides who have backed down during public confrontations, including his spokeswoman, Sarah Huckabee Sanders, who was asked to leave the Red Hen restaurant in Virginia last month by the establishment’s owner.

Two weeks ago, Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen walked out of a downtown Mexican restaurant after demonstrators followed her inside to rail against the administration for separating children from migrant parents.

“Shame!” the protesters shouted while Nielsen remained in her seat, her head down as she typed messages on her smartphone.

Newt Gingrich, the former Republican House speaker and Trump ally, said the way to end the public confrontations is “to call the police.”

“You file charges and you press them,” Gingrich said. “We have no reason to tolerate barbarians trying to impose totalitarian behavior by sheer force, and we have every right to defend ourselves.”

He described the president’s opponents as those who “went through a psychotic episode and are having the political equivalent of PTSD. And when they wake up in the morning to the genius that Trump is, he tweets and they say, ‘Oh my God! He’s still president!’ And they get sicker.”

Referring to Trump’s advisers, Gingrich said, “They should take solace in the fact that we must be winning, since these people are so crazy. They used to be passive because they thought they were the future. Now they know we’re the future, and it’s driving them nuts.”

When she arrived in Washington, Conway said she expected that people “would help transition into the next administration. I wasn’t expecting people to try to undo the election and drive us out of town.”

For a time, Conway had Secret Service protection, though not because of anything that occurred in her travels around the city. She described her random encounters with Washingtonians as largely pleasant as she has shopped at the Giant on Wisconsin Avenue, and bought a bridal shower gift at Bloomingdales in Friendship Heights. The other night, she said she ate at Arucola on Connecticut Avenue, sitting at an outdoor table.

“It’s just endless selfies,” said George Conway, an attorney who has set himself apart from his wife a bit by criticizing Trump on Twitter. “It makes it hard sometimes to leave when you have to go some place.”

Referring to Kellyanne, he said, “She has been getting a harder time from me about working for this administration than walking down the street.”

Still, there are plenty of moments that are not free from heckling.

When a stranger at a Baltimore Orioles game took her photo and mumbled that she was famous “for all the wrong reasons,” Conway said she walked over to him.

“I’m fluent in ignoramus,” she said. “What did you say?”

Then she took her own photo of him and announced that she was adding it to her “collection of underachieving men.”

'Freaking out'

During Bush’s presidency, Rove said he generally ate at home, though he sometimes went to a nearby pizzeria for takeout or a restaurant in a shopping center in Bethesda where “the wait staff would put us in a corner so no one could see us.”

“We were very circumspect in Washington,” Rove said, especially because of moments such as a Sunday in 2004 when several hundred demonstrators surrounded his Palisades home to protest Bush’s immigration policies. Rove was inside with his wife and young son while the protesters banged on their windows.

“My wife was freaking out,” he recalled.

Tom Davis, a Virginia Republican who spent 13 years in Congress, said Washington has always been a hotbed of dissent. What has changed, he said, is that aggressive tactics “are becoming more normalized.”

“We’re in a situation where bad behavior is being rewarded,” he said. “There are no filters. I don’t know where it ends.”

After Mink, the schoolteacher, confronted Pruitt on Monday, television news shows sent chauffeur-driven cars to deliver her to their studios. On social media, Mink found herself applauded and chided.

She did not appear to mind the attention.

After Pruitt resigned, she tweeted: “Hey @realDonaldTrump where are you going for lunch tomorrow?”

I truly wish Newt would shut up.

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GreyhoundFan

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AmazonGrace

This story about Kellyanne and George Conway is the bomb. She brags that she is more famous than George and wants to diss him in a Wapo story anonymously as, "a person familiar with their relationship".

 

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Depressed
onekidanddone
7 minutes ago, AmazonGrace said:

This story about Kellyanne and George Conway is the bomb. She brags that she is more famous than George and wants to diss him in a Wapo story anonymously as, "a person familiar with their relationship".

 

I see she has picked up her boss’s style of repeating the same phrase over and over while saying absolutely nothing 

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Cartmann99
19 hours ago, AmazonGrace said:

This story about Kellyanne and George Conway is the bomb. She brags that she is more famous than George and wants to diss him in a Wapo story anonymously as, "a person familiar with their relationship".

 

 I don't think Kellyanne's marriage is going to survive the Trump administration.

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AmazonGrace

It's not a divorce, it's an alternative form of eternal love and devotion.

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Happy
fraurosena

First off, let me say that I'm not posting this because of what Conjob is saying here, weird though that may be. 

Second, you guys know I'm not one to often comment on peoples' appearances. It's their actions I find much more important. But when I saw Kellyanne in this video, I was struck by how incredibly thin she looks. She's always looked haggard and gaunt and she never had much flesh on her bones to begin with, but she looks absolutely skeletal now. She has lost an incredible amount of weight since we last saw her. That is not healthy. Her arms and legs are stick-like and her skinny jeans  are actually baggy around her legs, emphazising her emaciated appearance. It seems the stress of working in this toxic WH environment is taking it's toll. 

Also, is having two disparately sized eyes a prerequisite for being a WH spokesperson, or is it a consequence?

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AmazonGrace

It's weird all right. Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain, he's only the most powerful man in the world, we can ignore what he's saying

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Happy
fraurosena
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, AmazonGrace said:

It's weird all right. Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain, he's only the most powerful man in the world, we can ignore what he's saying

Yeah, please don’t pay attention to the man sitting behind the curtain, because if you pull it aside you’ll see Putin. 

Edited by fraurosena
Typo

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GreyhoundFan
10 hours ago, fraurosena said:

Second, you guys know I'm not one to often comment on peoples' appearances. It's their actions I find much more important. But when I saw Kellyanne in this video, I was struck by how incredibly thin she looks. She's always looked haggard and gaunt and she never had much flesh on her bones to begin with, but she looks absolutely skeletal now. She has lost an incredible amount of weight since we last saw her. That is not healthy. Her arms and legs are stick-like and her skinny jeans  are actually baggy around her legs, emphazising her emaciated appearance. It seems the stress of working in this toxic WH environment is taking it's toll. 

I agree with you. Other than the Orange Menace, I tend to not comment on appearance. However, with K-Con, it seems like a case of "make a deal with the devil and you'll be burned". She certainly looks fried.

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Botkinetti

I think it is probable that  that almost all the people working closely with trump are starting to feel the physical effects of dealing with the unending chaos.

Odd sleep habits leading to odd behaviour. Higher cholesterol numbers because most comfort food is not healthy. Blood pressure concerns. 

Nothing is working out like they expected and yet they still have to pretend they work for an excellent leader who wants the best for the country. I think they are all starting to fall apart.

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AmazonGrace

Yeah and I think it takes an extra big toll on Kellyanne because she's not even a true believer.

Before Trump employed her she had some true things to say about him.

When she's s lying  she knows that it's not even for a good cause.

She sees him for what he is and defends all his crap anyway.

You can't do that forever and still get to keep your soul.

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Cartmann99
On 8/18/2018 at 6:35 PM, GreyhoundFan said:

I agree with you. Other than the Orange Menace, I tend to not comment on appearance. However, with K-Con, it seems like a case of "make a deal with the devil and you'll be burned". She certainly looks fried.

She always looks exhausted to me. I wonder how often Trump calls and wakes her up when she's sleeping?

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Depressed
onekidanddone
9 hours ago, AmazonGrace said:

Yeah and I think it takes an extra big toll on Kellyanne because she's not even a true believer.

Before Trump employed her she had some true things to say about him.

When she's s lying  she knows that it's not even for a good cause.

She sees him for what he is and defends all his crap anyway.

You can't do that forever and still get to keep your soul.

Her soul sailed on the River Styx a long time ago.

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Waffle Time
JMarie

She's arguing with Chris Cuomo on CNN.  I feel sooooo bad for Cuomo.  Trust me, there will be discussions about this interview.

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AmazonGrace

 

 

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GreyhoundFan

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GreyhoundFan

"Kellyanne Conway still can’t handle the truth'

Spoiler

It would be difficult to contrive a more miserable professional existence: Kellyanne Conway, counselor to President Trump, must appear on cable news to defend the indefensible, with no room, no latitude to give an inch. This bind plays out from time to time on the airwaves, though rarely in the searing fashion of Thursday night’s edition of CNN’s “Cuomo Prime Time.”

As the segment proceeded, Conway did what she often does: attempt to deflect questions about the president’s mendacious and otherwise scandalous behavior by steering discussion toward the economy. When Cuomo pointed out that there’s an ongoing investigation relating to the Trump presidential campaign, Conway shot back, “So, you’ve covered that more — you cover that more than the booming economy. You cover that more than the low unemployment rate. You cover that more than the consumer …”

CNN and other outlets indeed cover the economy. But one thing about the economy: It doesn’t lie, nor does it invent noteworthy responses when pressed about lies.

And Cuomo had one heck of a presidential lie to place before Conway on Thursday night. As The Post’s Fact Checker Glenn Kessler wrote this week, Trump’s various and shifting answers about the payments arranged by himself and associates for women who’d claimed to have had affairs with him amount to something definitive: “Not just misleading. Not merely false. A lie.” We know this because there’s audiotape of Trump speaking with fixer Michael Cohen about hush arrangements at the time that they were made. Months later, when confronted by reporters about the matter, Trump claimed he didn’t know about the $130,000 payment to Stormy Daniels to keep her mouth shut. And in a “Fox & Friends” interview that aired on Thursday, Trump said that he learned about the payments “later on.”

A clear and consequential lie. How did Conway handle the evidence? Typically.

CONWAY: We can’t even get our agenda covered on CNN because —

CUOMO: That’s not true. We cover it all the time.

CONWAY: Let’s do it today.

CUOMO: But listen, hold on a second — the truth matters. That’s what we sell to our audience because that’s the only reason we have a job. The truth is, he lied about this. You guys should own it.

CONWAY: Lied about what?

CUOMO: And move forward.

CONWAY: I’m sorry. Lied about what?

(CROSSTALK)

CUOMO: That he knew about what Michael Cohen was doing with these women and the payments. He lied about not knowing.

CONWAY: He knew about it after —

CUOMO: I know that’s a lie.

CONWAY: That payments were made.

CUOMO: That’s a lie.

CONWAY: Says who, you?

(CROSSTALK)

CUOMO: Yes, says me, says the facts.

CONWAY: Why? Why? What facts?

What facts? The ones that have been playing on CNN, Fox News, MSNBC, The Washington Post, the New York Times and every other outlet that Conway monitors obsessively so that she can nitpick them. As Conway made clear in the interview, she wants the public to latch on to the latest version of the story — the latest facts, so to speak:

CONWAY: No, he’s saying he didn’t know about it at the time. And he said yesterday —

CUOMO: I know. And that’s true.

CONWAY: — that’s aired this morning, he said he knew about it after the facts.

CUOMO: I know. But that’s not true.

And so it went — a frustrating and circular exercise in Trump-era obfuscation, not unlike the time that Conway unfurled the notion of “alternative facts” last year in a discussion with NBC News’s Chuck Todd. What’s worse: Lying, or covering for a liar? Conway, along with Trump’s press secretaries, have introduced that debate to the American public.

And Conway attempted to deploy one of press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders’s deflective moves when pressed on Cuomo about the big Stormy Daniels lie: “You’ve asked me 10 times the same question, and let me tell you, the president already answered the question,” said Conway. Under previous presidents, that might be a plausible response, considering that previous presidents weren’t addicted to lying.

As they went back and forth in a marathon discussion, Conway at one point sought to devalue Cuomo’s line of questioning by insulting him professionally: “You were a world-class journalist who used to go to plane crash sites and cover war,” she said. Never mind that Cuomo — as he pointed out — still does travel to breaking-news sites. In what way is hounding a White House counselor about the lies of her boss is something other than world-class journalism?

Look — Cuomo and his peers would be happy to go wall-to-wall on health care, or on a debate about U.S. foreign policy or whatever. Yet the world-class story playing out right now around Washington is the extraordinary commute of various Trump associates back and forth to federal courthouses. Those proceedings have the cleansing effect of squeezing truth from scoundrels like Michael Cohen — something that journalists haven’t had the leverage to produce.

And people like Conway cannot handle the truth about the president’s lie, as she demonstrated in this exchange:

CONWAY: Are you going to talk about —

CUOMO: No, you have to admit it. You have to.

CONWAY: No, I don’t. Are you kidding me?

To admit the president lied would be just too much for Conway and her boss, who maybe would just have to adjust the A-plus grade that he has given himself for his performance.

 

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AmazonGrace

Woman who wanted to bash her husband anonymously weighs in: 

 

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GreyhoundFan

K-Con's hubby just fact-checked the TT:

 

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