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Anyone know this book?


meee
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I'm trying to remember the name of a book that we randomly had around when I was little.  I don't think anyone read it except me, and that's because I read everything.  It was written by a husband/wife team, and it was about parenting a large family, and they had nine children.  I definitely remember nine, and there was a picture of all of them, age range baby to 20ish, on the back cover.  I don't think they were particularly fundie, at least I don't remember any frumpers or head coverings or anything like that.  Any ideas?

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This could be "Yours, Mine, and Ours" by Helen Beardsley - but they had 20 children in a blended family.

Another possibility - "Who Are the DeBolts? And Where Did They Get 19 Kids?" - documentary film about a family that adopted many children, including severely disabled war refugees.

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Just had a visit. They're scarily wholesome, aren't they? If I had been a member of the family and been forced to pose in a tree, I would have found a way to sneak a copy of a shot to awkward family photos - it looks like it would fit in.

Also what is with fundie families and their desire to instruct others on diets and weight loss? This is a subset of people for who Costco is a main supermarket because bulk is cheaper but bulk is not necessarily healthy (although you can get healthy food at Costco, it's probably not as cheap or on the list); where casseroles with tater tots are food staples; where girls eat teeny salad portions and maaaaybe some boiled chicken while watching their brothers gorge because they have to be thin and trim to get a godly husband.  

They know nothing, John Maxwell Snow! (sorry, just came to me somehow, couldn't help myself!)

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6 hours ago, purjolok84 said:

Just had a visit. They're scarily wholesome, aren't they? If I had been a member of the family and been forced to pose in a tree, I would have found a way to sneak a copy of a shot to awkward family photos - it looks like it would fit in.

Also what is with fundie families and their desire to instruct others on diets and weight loss? This is a subset of people for who Costco is a main supermarket because bulk is cheaper but bulk is not necessarily healthy (although you can get healthy food at Costco, it's probably not as cheap or on the list); where casseroles with tater tots are food staples; where girls eat teeny salad portions and maaaaybe some boiled chicken while watching their brothers gorge because they have to be thin and trim to get a godly husband.  

They know nothing, John Maxwell Snow! (sorry, just came to me somehow, couldn't help myself!)

I know I risk sounding annoying for defending against this idea again, but....

Tater tot casserole is not a fundie staple. It may be a Duggar staple, it may even be an ATI staple, but my friends would think I had lost my mind if I tried to serve that. It actually makes me laugh out loud thinking about it. A rather large amount of fundies are foodies and/or granola types. Canned soups and tater tots don't make the cut. 

I'm interested in your teeny salads with a bite of chicken while brothers gorge scenario. I've not read anything like this before, can you point me in the right direction?

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I know I risk sounding annoying for defending against this idea again, but....
Tater tot casserole is not a fundie staple. It may be a Duggar staple, it may even be an ATI staple, but my friends would think I had lost my mind if I tried to serve that. It actually makes me laugh out loud thinking about it. A rather large amount of fundies are foodies and/or granola types. Canned soups and tater tots don't make the cut. 
I'm interested in your teeny salads with a bite of chicken while brothers gorge scenario. I've not read anything like this before, can you point me in the right direction?


The teeny tiny portion thing - I was refering to fundie girls being expected to diet/eat less than their male counterparts. I think mention of how little the Duggar girls eat or how younger girls have been put on diets have been discussed here on FJ before.

To be fair, it's probably not ao much a 'fundie' thing as it is a 'gender' thing in some families. I know that as a child, whenever we would have a family get together with my Italian nonni, when it was lunchtime males were served first and got bigger portions (you know, to prepare them for the hard day's work of lazing around in front of a television). Females would be served after, not get as much, and then do the washing up and serving of dessert. It was so annoying - sometimes I would be hungry afterwards but there wasn't enough for seconds. Mum would never put up with this behaviour at home but it was hard to resist when visiting. Dad did help with washing though :)
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10 minutes ago, purjolok84 said:

 


The teeny tiny portion thing - I was refering to fundie girls being expected to diet/eat less than their male counterparts. I think mention of how little the Duggar girls eat or how younger girls have been put on diets have been discussed here on FJ before.

To be fair, it's probably not ao much a 'fundie' thing as it is a 'gender' thing in some families. I know that as a child, whenever we would have a family get together with my Italian nonni, when it was lunchtime males were served first and got bigger portions (you know, to prepare them for the hard day's work of lazing around in front of a television). Females would be served after, not get as much, and then do the washing up and serving of dessert. It was so annoying - sometimes I would be hungry afterwards but there wasn't enough for seconds. Mum would never put up with this behaviour at home but it was hard to resist when visiting. Dad did help with washing though :)

 

Interesting. The only family I can think of like that is Erika, though I'm sure there are others. Thankfully, not anyone that I know of. 

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Tater tot casserole is definitely not ATI approved. Gothard was into fresh ground grain for flour, natural, organic food, etc. Food is definitely an area the Duggars split from ATI and most other similar families I know personally. Casseroles would be lentils and brown rice with home made bone broth or fermented salsas. Lol. 

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Tater tot casserole is definitely not ATI approved. Gothard was into fresh ground grain for flour, natural, organic food, etc. Food is definitely an area the Duggars split from ATI and most other similar families I know personally. Casseroles would be lentils and brown rice with home made bone broth or fermented salsas. Lol. 


Fair enough - that makes more sense. Certainly far more healthier. How ironic that it's not just the Bible that the Duggars choose to cherry pick from; somehow cheap nasty meat/soup/potato mix wins over their cult's recommended healthier options for large families.

I couldn't imagine the J'Slaves milling whole flour and soaking beans and lentils anyway. Didn't some of the girls make bread at some stage?
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Gothard was very much into wholesome cooking. I think the first wisdom booklet included huge amounts about grinding your own wheat and making whole grain breads. ATI offered a video cooking class that was all about how to cook healthy for a large family. The Voeller family, pre-scandal, sold healthy cook books through IBLP. I think they were vegan, but I don't remember enjoying their food very much. 

I think people like Gil, Kelly, Jim Bob and Michelle were just too lazy to go through the work to provide healthy meals. Plenty of mega families in ATI were able to do it, so it is possible. The recipes Kelly shared on the original Bates blog made Tater Tot casserole look positively yummy. 

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Kelly was the one who did "steak and potatoes" with fried bologna, potatoes spread on top, sprinkled with a bit of cheese.  Of course, Alyssa was pretty young when she had to start cooking for the whole family while helping raise her siblings, so it is no wonder they had stuff like this. Healthy cooking would have required effort on the part of Gil and Kelly, but eating like that was not encouraged by IBLP/ATI

 

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23 minutes ago, formergothardite said:

Gothard was very much into wholesome cooking. I think the first wisdom booklet included huge amounts about grinding your own wheat and making whole grain breads. ATI offered a video cooking class that was all about how to cook healthy for a large family. The Voeller family, pre-scandal, sold healthy cook books through IBLP. I think they were vegan, but I don't remember enjoying their food very much. 

I think people like Gil, Kelly, Jim Bob and Michelle were just too lazy to go through the work to provide healthy meals. Plenty of mega families in ATI were able to do it, so it is possible. The recipes Kelly shared on the original Bates blog made Tater Tot casserole look positively yummy. 

I think what I will never understand is that they followed him to the letter on marriage/family advice when he was never married or had children. 

Yet, healthy cooking was too hard?! It's so confusing. 

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5 hours ago, formergothardite said:

I think people like Gil, Kelly, Jim Bob and Michelle were just too lazy to go through the work to provide healthy meals. Plenty of mega families in ATI were able to do it, so it is possible.

 

Yeah, I don't understand how those families justified not cooking healthier meals from scratch. By the time they were on TV, they each had how many kids that were either old enough to cook or at least help out with prep/cooking? Not to mention nobody having outside jobs.

I'm guessing the advice to make wholesome, home-cooked food is related to their religious emphasis on being "self-reliant" in other areas of life? I don't know what exemption people could come up with for not cooking then if their main religious leader promoted it. Perhaps I missed something in the Bible about the Lord providing convenient packaged foods for godly people? :my_angel:

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6 hours ago, December said:

I'm guessing the advice to make wholesome, home-cooked food is related to their religious emphasis on being "self-reliant" in other areas of life? I don't know what exemption people could come up with for not cooking then if their main religious leader promoted it. Perhaps I missed something in the Bible about the Lord providing convenient packaged foods for godly people?

I still have the Wholesome Food Preparation Course handbook(because there are good recipes in it) and basically it teaches that God provided wholesome food and he wants us to eat it. There is also a lot about having the self-control to not eat junk food. Eating junk food was letting Satan build a fortress in your heart. 

I'm not sure if this course was still around when the Duggars/Bates got into IBLP/ATI, but it is probably one of the best things they made. Take out all the religious mumbo-jumbo and it teaches real skills on how to plan a weekly menu, budget for healthy food and cook healthy meals that people will actually eat. The only thing that didn't work was the blender waffles because you really can't grind wheat in a regular blender. I broke my mother's blender attempting that. 

I just think it comes down to the Bates and Duggar parents being lazy. They would have had to put more effort into their family, and they weren't going to do that. 

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16 hours ago, JemimaPuddle-Duck said:

A rather large amount of fundies are foodies and/or granola types. Canned soups and tater tots don't make the cut. 

I agree.  The canned soup phenomenon goes beyond Fundies and has its roots in the time-saving Campbells Soup recipe books of the fifties. I have to insert this emoticon on principle, sorry.  :puke-right:

People may want to check out the organically obsessed Boyer Sisters and (may doG, help us) the Maxwell family for examples of Fundies more focused on healthy eating.  Bean burritos, anyone?

12 hours ago, purjolok84 said:

I couldn't imagine the J'Slaves milling whole flour and soaking beans and lentils anyway. Didn't some of the girls make bread at some stage?

Yes, they did.  They also make pickles. I too can bake bread and would do it more if I had a fancy schmancy bread-maker like they have.  Jana seems to be more into healthy eating these days and was also in Weight Watchers at one point.

Back to topic: the Eyres are annoyingly smug.  They seem to want to make us believe they are the Gilbreths reincarnated but really miss the mark.  Fun rabbit hole for those interested in time and motion studies and female engineers and scientists - we owe our functional kitchens and the "work triangle" to Lillian Moller Gilbreth.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lillian_Moller_Gilbreth

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My granny had the Gilbreth book "Cheaper by the dozen". I remember reading it and liking it as a child.

Granny only had two kids though.

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On ‎1‎/‎15‎/‎2017 at 10:20 AM, Marian the Librarian said:

This could be "Yours, Mine, and Ours" by Helen Beardsley - but they had 20 children in a blended family.

Another possibility - "Who Are the DeBolts? And Where Did They Get 19 Kids?" - documentary film about a family that adopted many children, including severely disabled war refugees.

This was a great movie (the original, I mean, w/Lucille Ball & Henry Fonda). I honestly didn't know that they were a real family until today.

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  • 4 months later...
On 1/16/2017 at 3:02 PM, purjolok84 said:

Females would be served after, not get as much, and then do the washing up and serving of dessert. It was so annoying

This still happens in the midwest.

Not to mention, gender separation in different rooms, and no one is fundie.  I would much prefer to hang out with the guys, than gossip with the ladies, serve and gather dirty dishes.

I have no idea why this is ok, and it is still done.  Sigh.

 

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On 1/16/2017 at 7:38 PM, purjolok84 said:

Was Kelly the one who created the Poor Man's Pizza recipe? That was disgusting.

Dare I ask.  Wonder Bread and ketchup with velveta cheese? 

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On 1/15/2017 at 6:04 AM, meee said:

I'm trying to remember the name of a book that we randomly had around when I was little.  I don't think anyone read it except me, and that's because I read everything.  It was written by a husband/wife team, and it was about parenting a large family, and they had nine children.  I definitely remember nine, and there was a picture of all of them, age range baby to 20ish, on the back cover.  I don't think they were particularly fundie, at least I don't remember any frumpers or head coverings or anything like that.  Any ideas?

Partly a thread drift and might be the same book, but I do remember one family who had bunch of kids. 

All of a Kind Family is about large Jewish family living the lower east side of NYC. Back then it was a predominantly Jewish enclave. My grandmother gave it to me because her family life mirrored the family in the book.  She too was Jewish, struggling to make ends meet and was the oldest of seven kids.  She went to work in a factory when she was 13  and never went back to school.

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Dare I ask.  Wonder Bread and ketchup with velveta cheese? 


Oh god. I'm going to go cry now. That's truly horrifying.

But when I recover, I'm going to cook something delicious. I've been watching Food Safari - so many different ways to cook from different countries and cultures and I'm inspired. Maybe if fundies had the same access to recipes and ideas there wouldn't be so much Velveeta consumed.
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On 1/15/2017 at 10:20 AM, Marian the Librarian said:

This could be "Yours, Mine, and Ours" by Helen Beardsley - but they had 20 children in a blended family.

I thought the book Helen Beardsley wrote was called Who Gets the Drumstick. 

I love the movie that book was based on. That is, the original one with Lucille Ball. The remake was okay - but nothing special. 

One of the children from the North-Beardsley family wrote a book called True North in which he discusses how Frank North (the father/stepfather) physically, emotionally and sexually abused the children.  

http://www.montereyherald.com/article/zz/20130824/NEWS/130828093

According to the article, some members of the family dispute these claims. 

Edited by RoseWilder
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