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HerNameIsBuffy

Not Rulz but foods we won't eat and Thanksgiving (thread drift originally)

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Meh
Coconut Flan
22 hours ago, DaisyD said:

Have you seen the original pumkin pie? Take pumkin and remove top as if to carve it. Remove seeds and fill with custard. Bake until custard is done and set out to cool. As the pumkin cools it collapses around the custard. Slice like pie and serve.

Why oh why did we change?  Perhaps next year I'll make that.

 

19 hours ago, formergothardite said:

I attempted this and I don't know what went wrong but I baked that pumpkin for three hours and the pumpkin never cooked, the custard never set and the outside about caught fire. 

Hm, things to figure out before I try this.

So sorry about the gravy.  We had none because the aunt by marriage where we went does not know how to make gravy.

 

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PreciousPantsofDoom
On 25/11/2016 at 9:33 AM, nausicaa said:

@PreciousPantsofDoom Are Canadian Thanksgiving foods the same as traditional American ones?

(I love hearing about weird regional holiday recipes.)

Traditional Canadian Thanksgiving foods?  Cedar planked Polar Bear steaks served with Prairie Oysters are pretty typical, followed by Beaver tails in cinnamon sugar. Yeah, no.

 IRL Canadian Thanksgiving has pretty much the same menu as American thanksgiving,  with only a few minor differences. There isn't quite so much hype about turkey, so having, say, prime rib or lasagna, or whatever instead isn't particularly noteworthy.

Beca u se our Thanksgiving was in October, I still had plenty of vegetables direct from our garden to serve with the turkey.  I roasted beets, carrots, and potatoes and had some fresh lettuce and arugula  for a salad too. I  don't know anybody who does that weird thing of putting marshmallows on sweet potato or who makes green bean casserole, but I'm pretty sure not everybody in the USA makes those either. 

I hear that Canadian pumpkin pie is spicier than the American version, but I'm not even sure how accurate that is.  I made an awesome one that had ground cinnamon, ground cloves and ground ginger (you may know it as jinger) in it,  but I've had plenty of bland ones here too.

In terms of regional things, I'll bet that tarte au sucre (sugar pie) makes it to the Thanksgiving table back east, particularly in Quebec.  It's pretty popular.

Can't think of much else though, but I'm not necessarily an expert on Canadian regional foods.  None of my Grandparents were born in Canada.  My Dad is first generation and grew up with a combo of Swedish and Scottish traditions with a sprinkling of Canadian foods thrown in for good measure.  My mum was British and only learned about things like pumpkin pie after she got married and moved here.  I remember my UK grandma finding the whole idea of pumpkin pie kind of weird.  Didn't matter how many times my mum tried to explain it to her, she wouldn't listen and  just couldn't understand how it could possibly be any good.  When my mum finally got her to try it, Grandma was quite pleasantly surprised. Turns out she had thought it was just chunks of pumpkin in a pie crust.

 

 

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Puzzled
Fascinated

Yes. Canadian Thanksgiving dinner is basically the same as the American one. Individual tastes vary, of course. Ours is in October which is nice because we aren't plunged into the Christmas (holiday) crap immediately after. However, we suck bigly because now we seem to have Black Friday shopping here, but on your Black Friday!!!  Which is annoying as hell as it's never been a thing here.  Presumably our stores want to keep Canadians shopping here instead of there. Why anyone would shop on Black Friday is beyond me, regardless of the country. That is insanity. 

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DaisyD
53 minutes ago, PreciousPantsofDoom said:

I hear that Canadian pumpkin pie is spicier than the American version, but I'm not even sure how accurate that is.  I made an awesome one that had ground cinnamon, ground cloves and ground ginger (you may know it as jinger) in it,  but I've had plenty of bland ones here too.

Those are the spices that I put in mine. Everyone loves them. 

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Satisfied
church_of_dog
10 minutes ago, DaisyD said:

Those are the spices that I put in mine. Everyone loves them. 

Same, or similar.  I see recipes that include allspice, ginger, cloves, cinnamon.  Sometimes nutmeg.  I leave out the cloves or just use a little because I don't really like the flavor.  My secret ingredient is a dash of cayenne.  Just enough to give it a little heat.  People love mine too!

(Also if you need any extra liquid in the mix, coconut milk is wonderful).

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Happy
ViolaSebastian
45 minutes ago, church_of_dog said:

Same, or similar.  I see recipes that include allspice, ginger, cloves, cinnamon.  Sometimes nutmeg.  I leave out the cloves or just use a little because I don't really like the flavor.  My secret ingredient is a dash of cayenne.  Just enough to give it a little heat.  People love mine too!

(Also if you need any extra liquid in the mix, coconut milk is wonderful).

My Thanksgiving this year included a discussion of the hostess' pumpkin pie recipe, which was her mother's. She's from the Midwest and it had just cinnamon in it, because anything else made the pie "too spicy." I joked with her that too spicy pumpkin pie is probably the most Midwestern thing I've ever heard. :pb_lol:

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ALM7
On 11/26/2016 at 7:41 PM, PreciousPantsofDoom said:

Traditional Canadian Thanksgiving foods?  Cedar planked Polar Bear steaks served with Prairie Oysters are pretty typical, followed by Beaver tails in cinnamon sugar. Yeah, no.

[snipped above post]

@PreciousPantsofDoom,  I had no idea Canada celebrated Thanksgiving.  In fact, I just saved a link to read up on the details, it said Canada has celebrated since 1578.  I always learn something new on FJ!

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NewOrleansLady
On 11/23/2016 at 1:08 PM, Destiny said:

*small voice* Assuming you mean fruitcake, I kind of like them. 

MR NOL and I love them especially with a glass of icy cold milk or with Old Fashion Vanilla Ice cream.

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NewOrleansLady
On 11/23/2016 at 10:12 PM, Maggie Mae said:

The Pennsylvania Dutch. My guess is that they make it to keep people away. 

Actually, the subject of stuffing/filling/dressing is really interesting to me; the various ingredients are SO regional and really go to show how we, in the US, have created SO many different traditions and so much of it is geographic. I think Maryland has people with oyster stuffing. And California wine country people started to use wine. It's all the same base - bread + spices + fruit/nuts/celery + whatever, but so many people started adding regional features. 

 

 

:-) 

 

Son-in-law is a fisherman.   We'll add crabmeat    or  oysters or shrimp to our basic bread dressing depending on what is available. It is always great.  Of course, we are always asked to bring a seafood type dish.

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SilverBeach

Yep, southerners eat cornbread, hence cornbread dressing, which is the only valid kind to me, lol.

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RosyDaisy

I love cornbread dressing. I bake mine in a dish. I don't stuff it in the turkey.

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