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Geechee Girl

Black Lives Matter

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purple_summer
15 hours ago, Geechee Girl said:

@purple_summer Thanks for the list. I've been following a few, and the others I've seen in retweets. Did you see the stream about "The Gaze" a few days ago? #BLAXIT had me rolling. It was a nice moment of levity.

The bit on "The Gaze" was in the list of tweets I posted unless you meant another one. I got a kick out of the #derayhasbeenreleasedparty. I love black twitter so fucking much. 

For anyone dealing with "All lives matter" nonsense (including the very black church I grew up in, let's just say I really don't attend anymore). 

And Mic posted this sobering video earlier today- 

Sorry I'm kind of just dumping tweets, work has me scatter-brained. Feel free to tag me if there's anything specific you want me to address. I am a degreed historian™ after all.

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VelociRapture

Its not much, but I did post a link to, "Sometimes You're a Caterpillar," on Facebook with a brief explanation that it explains privilege and what empathy is - which is more important now more than ever. My sister, a new mom and teacher, is the only one who liked it. Not my intended audience since she's very up to date in these things, but still. I suppose it's better that I posted and at least tried?

@iweartanktopsIt's nice they gave the little girl a teddy bear and placed her mom in a comfortable room. Would of been nicer if they hadn't shot a man they both seem to have loved a great deal. But, you know, teddy bear makes it all better.  :pb_evil::pb_rollseyes:

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iweartanktops
1 hour ago, VelociRapture said:

Its not much, but I did post a link to, "Sometimes You're a Caterpillar," on Facebook with a brief explanation that it explains privilege and what empathy is - which is more important now more than ever. My sister, a new mom and teacher, is the only one who liked it. Not my intended audience since she's very up to date in these things, but still. I suppose it's better that I posted and at least tried?

@iweartanktopsIt's nice they gave the little girl a teddy bear and placed her mom in a comfortable room. Would of been nicer if they hadn't shot a man they both seem to have loved a great deal. But, you know, teddy bear makes it all better.  :pb_evil::pb_rollseyes:

Yeah. On your first point, I've noticed that the majority of #alllivesmatter aren't going to read the articles and thoughtful posts we put on Facebook and other social media. It really sucks, but I've noticed a lot of people (unfortunately that I used to respect) don't want to read anything or talk to anyone who doesn't agree with them. Sorry, but I feel justified in calling those people fools. Black, White, I don't care. If you're not willing to even try to see another perspective, you're just stupid. I know it's harsh, but I really mean it. And if I ever display that type of wilful ignorance on this forum, please call me out! 

On your second point, yeah, great, she was in a cell with blankets and shit, after she witnessed the man she loved being murdered by a police officer. Ugh. And I think about her little girl often. My goodness. 

Just a general side note - I'm not sure if I've seen it here on FJ, but I've noticed a lot of people question why Diamond was filming "instead of helping" and why she sounded so calm (I'm not judging anyone for asking these valid questions, btw). From personal experience, as a Black woman, I would have done the same thing. I think she was calm because she was in shock, her daughter was there, and her life was in danger. The last time my brother was pulled over, I had my phone set up to record, the second I saw the lights flashing. This is how we think. We quickly reviewed together, that no matter the officer's attitude, Brother must remain calm, keep his hands on the wheel, etc. And I reassured him that my camera was ready if we got a bad feeling. That's just our reality. This wasn't in the hood. This was in upper middle class, White suburbs, and we were driving his new BMW. 

ETA - the police officer pulled us over for a legitimate reason (I think we were speeding to the airport), and he treated us with respect, and my brother got a warning, if I remember correctly. See? Isn't it amazing? I want equality and justice but I don't hate every officer. ;)

Oh, also, I need to somehow get myself off of social media. I'm obsessing and trying to kindly reason with strangers. It's definitely not helping my anxiety. It's probably not helping anything. I just feel helpless. :(

@VelociRapture, looking back, I can see that it may appear I was being argumentative with you. I actually agree with your post. I'm just having a really hard time with all of this, so I'm not sure if I'm communicating well. I just want to clarify that. :)

Edited by iweartanktops

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sophie10130

The best thing I saw when someone was like "Why was she using the phone to film??? She should have been calling for help!"

And someone replied, "Who was she going to call? The Double Police?"

:pb_rollseyes:

That emoji doesn't fully show my true face, which has no tiny smile. Just eye rolling.

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laPapessaGiovanna
3 hours ago, iweartanktops said:

n your second point, yeah, great, she was in a cell with blankets and shit, after she witnessed the man she loved being murdered by a police officer.

WTF? Why? What did she do? It's not like a cell is the right place for witnesses, unless you want to intimidate them.

Thank to Sophie, Velocirapture and batuityma for answering my questions. It absolutely makes sense that white people don't want to take away the focus from POCs nor speak for them, but I am glad you are finding other ways to show support. Especially considering how some media make it look like it's just an enraged mob of black people causing trouble for something that after all isn't much of a problem. 

I know that my solidarity doesn't mean much but #blacklivesmatter people have it.

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Toothfairy

White privilege means it's easier for you as a white person to get a job, an education, food stamps, an abortion, birth control, healthcare, housing, see people that look like you everyday,  when one white person does something bad the whole white race isn't blamed, being able to carry a gun without being shot, getting less jail time for the  same crimes POC do, being able to walk into a store without being followed, not getting shot for getting your id, being able to say you don't see color and are colored blind, having 19 kids all dumb your own tv show and people praise you, molesting young girls at 15 and people tell you you were just a boy. 

And this. White blonde hair blue eye Jesus. 

 

https://twitter.com/BettyBowers/status/751879676759568385

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=1yEQDBSt58w

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Toothfairy
23 hours ago, Mercer said:

All Lives Matter used as a rebuttal to Black Lives Matter drives me crazy.

It's like if a ship was torpedoed, and the people on the deck of the sinking ship were yelling "Someone please save us!" while people safe on the shore were yelling back "Everyone deserves to be saved!" - it's technically true, but it's entirely dismissive of the fact that some lives are in imminent danger and others are not.

Acting like Black Lives Matter automatically means other lives don't seems to me like a willful refusal to understand.

All lives matter

 Refugees- Screw them

Muslims-Screw them

Blacks-Screw them

The poor- Screw them

Gun control- Wahhh. Obama Muslim ass wants to take my guns. 

Emmett Till, MLK, Malcom X, Native Americans, sterilizing black women, giving black men syphilis, all didn't matter. Yet all lives matter. No all lives don't matter to all lives matter. 

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Sabal

There is a case local to me that completely shocked and shattered me. A young black musician was on his way home from a gig. (Cory Jones - easy to find the story)  His car broke down on a highway off-ramp.   An off duty cop in an un-marked van shot him multiple times, and killed him.  This happened in October.  It took some time but the cop has been indicted. 

The entire community was/is outraged. There is a lot of gun violence here. There have been other cases of police killing unarmed black men. 

There were many peaceful and respectful protests, gatherings and prayer vigils. It's a multi-cultural city and people of all colors were outspoken in their support. 

What boggles my mind is the general lack of understanding of a very real problem.  #Blacklivesmatter  because if the events happened the exact same way and Cory Jones was white, he'd still be alive.

 

 

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iweartanktops
46 minutes ago, laPapessaGiovanna said:

WTF? Why? What did she do? It's not like a cell is the right place for witnesses, unless you want to intimidate them.

Thank to Sophie, Velocirapture and batuityma for answering my questions. It absolutely makes sense that white people don't want to take away the focus from POCs nor speak for them, but I am glad you are finding other ways to show support. Especially considering how some media make it look like it's just an enraged mob of black people causing trouble for something that after all isn't much of a problem. 

I know that my solidarity doesn't mean much but #blacklivesmatter people have it.

To the bold: exactly. 

As far as people not wanting to say the wrong thing, or take the focus from POC, I can't speak for everyone, but please do it. I think it's imperative that White people, specifically, speak out about all of this! I've cried actual tears of... Humility, gratefulness, etc., at the way some of my White friends have spoken out. Yes, people disagree with them and argue back, but I strongly believe that you can make an impact on those who want to stay in their bubble. They can't tell you to stop pulling the "race card," and other ridiculous things like that. Of course, do what you want, but I just wanted to give you some feedback about that. I think of it like those who are heterosexual, who advocate for equal rights and treatment for those who are LGBTQ+. We can be a voice for that community who is also often oppressed. 

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Jinder Roles

I think it's important for white people to talk about it and acknowledge it. But they should speak among each other instead of taking voices away from POC, especially black people right now. We're so used to being silenced and we're just tired. Not to say that white people can't speak out but be careful and discerning in how you do it. Privilege and power plays into everything, even when you're fighting against systemic injustices. 

I appreciate my conscious white friends and love them lots, but at the same time I'm not going to give them all the praise and hand them cookies for being decent human beings. 

Anecdote Time:

Once while driving with someone in upstate New York (who was also black) we were pulled over by police in the dead of night. I was scared shitless. I stopped breathing for 20 seconds and my hands were shaking.  The policeman had a taser and two freaking guns! He was also very rude and  falsely accused the driver of being drunk (we were all absolutely sober) and driving on the other side of the road (very untrue). He was also angry with the driver for using his brights (it was dark and the road was empty. The reason he didn't turn off his bright light was because he was rounding a corner and didn't see the cop car at first).  It was ridiculous. I don't know how y'all black people in America deal with this all the time. 

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Mecca
49 minutes ago, Toothfairy said:

All lives matter

 Refugees- Screw them

Muslims-Screw them

Blacks-Screw them

The poor- Screw them

Gun control- Wahhh. Obama Muslim ass wants to take my guns. 

Emmett Till, MLK, Malcom X, Native Americans, sterilizing black women, giving black men syphilis, all didn't matter. Yet all lives matter. No all lives don't matter to all lives matter. 

I fully admit I have been full on witch mode recently and I am giving it to people I know that starts with that AllLivesMatter crappola. I tried to be respectful and listen to them in the past, but nothing gets through their thick skulls. You can't reason with them. I now correct them and say that could not possibility be true for them simply because of what they stand for and who they back for president. It is all lip service to make themselves feel better at this point. Slacktivism at its finest. 

Story Time: We went for some ice cream tonight. I was in line to get me some banana ice cream when I saw my husband's eyes get big as flying saucers while he was reading something on his phone. I get back to the table and he says, "One of your beloved Tenors really did something stupid and you will be REALLY pissed." I then read it. Urg. The stupid ass Tenor, Remigio Pereia, decided to change the lyrics to the Canadian national anthem at the All-Star game with All Lives Matter garbage and held up a sign while doing so. Yeah. So gross and so disrespectful. He got canned from the group and swiftly at that. The rest of the guys had no idea he was going to pull that crap and don't agree with him. Effin'' jerk. Why do people do crap like this? Why does he not get the bigger picture here and understand what Black Lives Matter really stands for? And to do that level of disrespect on the national stage and to a national anthem? Unreal.

 

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myhobby

 

A link from my news feed.  I wish more people would read it and listen.

https://thsppl.com/i-racist-538512462265#.czazmcxik

 

As for me, I'll continue to speak out, but hopefully not over (the more important voices).  I'm only 1 person, and I probably won't change anyone's mind, but I couldn't sleep at night if I didn't at least try.

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Meridae

I will admit that I'm not as liberal as many in this thread when it comes to BLM, and some of the individuals operating under the banner of BLM worry me quite a bit. I'd like to think that true racism is in the hearts of a very small minority as opposed to everyone being a secret flaming racist, and that incidents such as being turned down for jobs because of a "ghetto" name, etc are due to unconscious prejudices formed by otherwise good people (not saying that unconscious prejudices aren't bad- we have to be aware of them and work to change them). My main problem with the movement is that I have no idea what they want. To me it seems like a lot of saber rattling and not a whole lot of solutions are coming from BLM. It doesn't help that my boyfriend's best friend/adopted brother (who is black) thinks the whole BLM/racism/white privelege thing is ridiculous and can't give me much insight into what needs to change. What I HAVE gleaned from him, though, is that education- REAL education- is one of the most vital tools needed to create a stronger society. Schools are falling apart, kids are dropping out or joining gangs/street life, and the government continues to strip funds from the school systems who need money the most. Education is the key to fixing what's broken and giving people tools to get themselves out of bad situations. It's not fair what's happening in these communities in terms of schooling and financially, inner city and poor communities will only continue to suffer.

This all being said, it breaks my heart that innocent people have been killed by police, wether through racism or even just misunderstanding. It's not right, and I hope that the truth will surface. My own community has been affected by one of the recent shootings and I grieve deeply for it.

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sophie10130

This is from the people who are called We The Protesters. It's called Campaign Zero. It's a daunting list of solutions, but they are very real and tangible. Like someone said upthread, BLM is not really a cohesive entity, so one town might have different goals in mind. But these are some of the things We The Protesters want. However, Stop Killing Black People Indiscriminately is a good enough reason, imo to protest.

http://www.joincampaignzero.org/solutions/#solutionsoverview

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Arwen
15 minutes ago, myhobby said:

 

A link from my news feed.  I wish more people would read it and listen.

https://thsppl.com/i-racist-538512462265#.czazmcxik

 

As for me, I'll continue to speak out, but hopefully not over (the more important voices).  I'm only 1 person, and I probably won't change anyone's mind, but I couldn't sleep at night if I didn't at least try.

This just puts everything into perspective so succinctly.  Thank you for posting it.  I think this is a great answer to all the white folks like me who don't even know where to start but want to see change because we're sick of seeing innocent people dying because the system is stacked against them.

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Geechee Girl

@myhobby Thank you for the link. It should be required reading. This really stood out to me,

Quote

The entire discussion of race in America centers around the protection of White feelings.

Ain't that the truth. I found myself participating in this as well in effort to not be the ABW. I'm down with that now, my pressure is up. 

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JillyO
4 hours ago, Meridae said:

I will admit that I'm not as liberal as many in this thread when it comes to BLM, and some of the individuals operating under the banner of BLM worry me quite a bit. I'd like to think that true racism is in the hearts of a very small minority as opposed to everyone being a secret flaming racist, and that incidents such as being turned down for jobs because of a "ghetto" name, etc are due to unconscious prejudices formed by otherwise good people (not saying that unconscious prejudices aren't bad- we have to be aware of them and work to change them). My main problem with the movement is that I have no idea what they want. To me it seems like a lot of saber rattling and not a whole lot of solutions are coming from BLM. It doesn't help that my boyfriend's best friend/adopted brother (who is black) thinks the whole BLM/racism/white privelege thing is ridiculous and can't give me much insight into what needs to change. What I HAVE gleaned from him, though, is that education- REAL education- is one of the most vital tools needed to create a stronger society. Schools are falling apart, kids are dropping out or joining gangs/street life, and the government continues to strip funds from the school systems who need money the most. Education is the key to fixing what's broken and giving people tools to get themselves out of bad situations. It's not fair what's happening in these communities in terms of schooling and financially, inner city and poor communities will only continue to suffer.

This all being said, it breaks my heart that innocent people have been killed by police, wether through racism or even just misunderstanding. It's not right, and I hope that the truth will surface. My own community has been affected by one of the recent shootings and I grieve deeply for it.

And the fact that you can possibly think that just shows your privilege. It's not a small minority. Not everyone is a secret flaming racist either, but racism is systemic and it's ingrained in all of us because this is the kind of society we live in. We have to actively work against it.

Personally, I think this is an excellent post and well worth the long-ish read:

 

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VelociRapture

@iweartanktopsDon't worry about it. This is an extremely emotional topic for a lot of people - I didn't take your post as argumentative. And if I had, too bad for me because it's not my place to be offended here.

I absolutely agree with your points. It's sad, but you're correct that a lot of people don't want to hear thoughtful posts. I needed to at least try though - and maybe my sister will at least use the video with her son one day. So I hope at least one child other than my own benefits from the post.

And personally, I don't question why Miss Reynolds filmed the encounter. If I were her I might have done the same thing - plus, had she attempted to help she may have been shot as well because the cop may have felt she was reaching for his weapon or something. Recording was the smart move in this situation and I'm really glad she and her daughter are physically ok - wish Mr. Castile was as well. 

Edited by VelociRapture

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VelociRapture
8 hours ago, Jinder Roles said:

I think it's important for white people to talk about it and acknowledge it. But they should speak among each other instead of taking voices away from POC, especially black people right now. We're so used to being silenced and we're just tired. Not to say that white people can't speak out but be careful and discerning in how you do it. Privilege and power plays into everything, even when you're fighting against systemic injustices. 

I appreciate my conscious white friends and love them lots, but at the same time I'm not going to give them all the praise and hand them cookies for being decent human beings. 

Anecdote Time:

Once while driving with someone in upstate New York (who was also black) we were pulled over by police in the dead of night. I was scared shitless. I stopped breathing for 20 seconds and my hands were shaking.  The policeman had a taser and two freaking guns! He was also very rude and  falsely accused the driver of being drunk (we were all absolutely sober) and driving on the other side of the road (very untrue). He was also angry with the driver for using his brights (it was dark and the road was empty. The reason he didn't turn off his bright light was because he was rounding a corner and didn't see the cop car at first).  It was ridiculous. I don't know how y'all black people in America deal with this all the time. 

I think your suggestions may be the best way for me to approach the subject, at least for now. I hate to say it, but the white people who need to be told off the most aren't going to listen to a black person about these things - it's more likely they'll be slightly more receptive to another white person. If I speak with someone, I'll try to do it more privately - that way, I'm not risking speaking over any voices that should be the focus of the overall conversation.

I'm going to do my best. I want to help. I don't want this to be the type of environment my child or nephew grow up in - it's not healthy and it's not safe for anyone (but especially for black people.)

The very few times I'm directly confronted by outright or casual racism I haven't known what to say or how to react - because it doesn't happen often and it makes me so uncomfortable to have someone say that to me because I'm white (like there's some super special snowflake club or something) that I honestly can't think of anything to say. I'm going to do better though. I don't have a choice other than to do better.

(And just an aside - but I want to be sure that using the term "black people" is the best word choice offline. I saw on another thread that a lot of people here prefer it, so I'm guessing it's ok to use it elsewhere as well?)

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Meridae
5 hours ago, JillyO said:

And the fact that you can possibly think that just shows your privilege. It's not a small minority. Not everyone is a secret flaming racist either, but racism is systemic and it's ingrained in all of us because this is the kind of society we live in. We have to actively work against it.

Personally, I think this is an excellent post and well worth the long-ish read:

 

No, I have to respectfully disagree with you. America has changed a lot in the past 50 or so years and yes, while pretty much everyone has some sort of prejudice (that they may or may not be aware of, and keep in mind that prejudice is somewhat natural), this doesn't mean they're racists who want all black people dead/gone/in ghettos/etc. Surely you cannot argue that there's a majority in America of racist, homophobic, intolerant jerks. Is there a good number? Yes. But not a majority. I work on my prejudices just as I expect others to. Some racists work in government, they need to be yanked out, and racist govt policies need to be changed. But the reality is that most people are good people.

And this still doesn't change that no solutions to racism have been presented. People can complain and argue and demand change, but so far there hasn't been a single solution I've heard of. I want to help the black community get on steady economic and social footing, and help others change their prejudices and negative views, but it's hard to do that when no one has any idea of where to begin. Give me some answers and I'll get to work. We know what the problems are- how do we fix them?

EDITED to add I know the black community faces a lot of problems and harmful stereotypes. They deal with a lot and I have nothing but respect for the people trying to rise above or simply keep on going the best they can. This is NOT me saying "everything is perfect in America", because it's not. But someone needs to find some answers to what ails us. Me, I think it's education and the support of small businesses in poor urban areas, but a PoC may have different or more specific ideas. Ultimately this will be a group effort.

Edited by Meridae

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iweartanktops
1 hour ago, VelociRapture said:

I think your suggestions may be the best way for me to approach the subject, at least for now. I hate to say it, but the white people who need to be told off the most aren't going to listen to a black person about these things - it's more likely they'll be slightly more receptive to another white person. If I speak with someone, I'll try to do it more privately - that way, I'm not risking speaking over any voices that should be the focus of the overall conversation.

I'm going to do my best. I want to help. I don't want this to be the type of environment my child or nephew grow up in - it's not healthy and it's not safe for anyone (but especially for black people.)

The very few times I'm directly confronted by outright or casual racism I haven't known what to say or how to react - because it doesn't happen often and it makes me so uncomfortable to have someone say that to me because I'm white (like there's some super special snowflake club or something) that I honestly can't think of anything to say. I'm going to do better though. I don't have a choice other than to do better.

(And just an aside - but I want to be sure that using the term "black people" is the best word choice offline. I saw on another thread that a lot of people here prefer it, so I'm guessing it's ok to use it elsewhere as well?)

@VelociRapture, you're fine. I would say that "Black people" is totally appropriate. I appreciate your concern to be sensitive to is and our preferences. I can tell your heart is in the right place, so even if you did say something offensive, I would be happy to teach you. 

To the bold, that's precisely what I was trying to say earlier. I think it's important for white people to speak out, because in many cases they will actually be heard. 

I'm a fan of Tim Wise. I read his book, White Like Me, years ago. It's a great book, but certainly a challenging read. It forces you to look at things that can be uncomfortable. 

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JillyO
36 minutes ago, Meridae said:

No, I have to respectfully disagree with you. America has changed a lot in the past 50 or so years and yes, while pretty much everyone has some sort of prejudice (that they may or may not be aware of, and keep in mind that prejudice is somewhat natural), this doesn't mean they're racists who want all black people dead/gone/in ghettos/etc. Surely you cannot argue that there's a majority in America of racist, homophobic, intolerant jerks. Is there a good number? Yes. But not a majority. I work on my prejudices just as I expect others to. Some racists work in government, they need to be yanked out, and racist govt policies need to be changed. But the reality is that most people are good people.

And this still doesn't change that no solutions to racism have been presented. People can complain and argue and demand change, but so far there hasn't been a single solution I've heard of. I want to help the black community get on steady economic and social footing, and help others change their prejudices and negative views, but it's hard to do that when no one has any idea of where to begin. Give me some answers and I'll get to work. We know what the problems are- how do we fix them?

EDITED to add I know the black community faces a lot of problems and harmful stereotypes. They deal with a lot and I have nothing but respect for the people trying to rise above or simply keep on going the best they can. This is NOT me saying "everything is perfect in America", because it's not. But someone needs to find some answers to what ails us. Me, I think it's education and the support of small businesses in poor urban areas, but a PoC may have different or more specific ideas. Ultimately this will be a group effort.

See, that's your misconception. It's not only racism to want black people dead, or at least confined to their ghettos and treated as second-class citizens at best. No, the majority of Americans don't want that. But yes, I very much believe the majority of Americans are racist. Because we live in a racist society.

It's racism to switch sidewalks when you see a black man coming your way at night. It's racism for police to disproportionately patrol black neighborhoods, and to stop cars with black drivers for reasons for which they would never stop white drivers (such as a busted tail light). It's racism that black schoolkids get suspended for wearing natural hair, or braids, or dreads. It's racism that black people get eyed suspiciously when shopping in a nice store, rather than being treated like any other customer. It's racism that people wth "black names" get fewer call backs for job interviews. It's racism that drugs which are disproportionately used black black Americans carry much higher prison sentences than almost identical drugs which are disproportionately used by white Americans. Did you actually read the Facebook post I linked above? Because you should, since you seem to think only concious racism is racism. Just because the majority of Americans doesn't think that all black people should die or be enslaved doesn't mean the majority of Americans isn't racist. That's not how it works.

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Jucifer
23 hours ago, Sabal said:

What really gets me is:  People flat out do not understand "white privilege" - 

It has nothing to do with what you have! It has everything to do with how you are treated. 

If because of the color of my skin, I can drive around in my car and not panic when I get pulled over or break down on the side of a road, and see a cop approach my vehicle...  

OR

If because of the color of my skin I drive my car around in fear because if I get pulled over the initial rules and assumptions are that I somehow pose the cop danger and I'd better not move my hands, reach for anything and because I'm terrified I'm suspect...  

 This is a problem!!!

If because of the color of my skin I can wander around a store and nobody gives me "side eye", or follows me around while I touch the merchandise lazily browsing...

OR

If because of the color of my skin I wander around a store, I get "side eye", and followed around, until I'm so uncomfortable I leave. 

This is a problem!

 

My husband and I went out for mexican food last Sunday. On our way back we got stuck in traffic. A car ahead of us had painted on its back windshield:

"I am unarmed. I'm a black person driving."

:(

ETA: I thought this was awesome. :)

Edited by Jucifer

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laPapessaGiovanna
1 hour ago, Meridae said:

while pretty much everyone has some sort of prejudice (that they may or may not be aware of, and keep in mind that prejudice is somewhat natural), this doesn't mean they're racists who want all black people dead

But Tamir Rice, Rekia Boyd, Amadou Diallo, Alton Sterling, Philando Castile are dead and it doesn't matter much to them or their families that you and supposedly the majority of Americans didn't want them dead.

Quote

Somehow, though, even in the most heinous cases, where the evidence appeared to be overwhelming, like with Boyd and Diallo, police were set free because they claimed they felt afraid.

Boyd and Diallo were unarmed, non-violent, law-abiding people who were minding their own business. They did nothing, but police blew them to bits and were set free because those officers imagined weapons and threats that never existed.

In essence, the white imagination of a black threat has been deemed sufficient evidence for police to shoot and kill at will.

www.nydailynews.com/news/national/king-micah-johnson-making-america-racist-creation-article-1.2704556

1 hour ago, Meridae said:

gone/in ghettos/etc.

Just one word: Flint.

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