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Arete

What's In Your Garden?

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Waffle Time
catlady

@frugaldreams, i love my pressure canner!  i use it mostly to can soup and broth, because i'd rather freeze things like beans.  but if i'm doing a large batch of tomatoes, i'll use the pressure canner because it holds more jars than the water bath.

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Astonished
Mela99
On 5/23/2017 at 3:54 PM, frugaldreams said:

I'm glad the gardening thread picked up. I wondered if I'd be posting into the black hole of the internet :)

I am currently obsessed with WWII Victory Gardens and have been working on getting my back yard garden up to snuff. It makes me feel better when I contemplate how much trouble our current administration might get us into, given the leaders penchant for butting heads with other megalomaniacs.

I got a pressure canner for a wedding gift and I fully intend to use it well this summer. I've already pickled asparagus but apparently I made it too tasty because there are only two jars left! LOL!

Oooh, me too - we got our canner last summer. LOVE it. I can't wait for the raspberries and strawberries to take off.

What all goes in the Victory Gardens? I've read about them before.

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frugaldreams

Here's a fun period film about it.
 

 

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TheOneAndOnly

Sean James Cameron has some good garden videos, including a Victory Garden project.  Wartime Kitchen Garden - Cleaning LIVE  is here -->  www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2j2IMyk-vI

Wartime Farm with Ruth Goodman, Alex Laglands and Peter Ginn is just amazing!  www.youtube.com/watch?v=CUsU5s0ofYo I love all the series of historical reenactments that they do. Real stuff, not flashy fake drama.

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Skyline

Nothing in my garden yet. I'm in northern Canada so it is still too cold to plant but my rhubarb, raspberries, haksaps, plum tree, and apple tree are all showing signs of life.

If you like historical gardening shows try and get your hands on The Victorian Kitchen Garden. It is fascinating to see all the techniques they used to extend their growing season.

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Waffle Time
catlady

i'm down by Niagara Falls (US side), and it's been too cold to do any planting yet.  i did buy a tray of herbs last weekend, but they're not in the ground yet.  i'm mostly giving the vegetable garden a break this year; the soil is probably depleted.   it did poorly last year, so i'm going to put down some compost and let it rest this year.  about the only thing to go in will be the aforementioned herbs and maybe 2 or 3 tomato plants, because i just can't do without tomatoes in the summer.  

the perennial flowers are doing well, except for the peony i planted last year--the rabbits ate it.  

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Skyline
3 minutes ago, catlady said:

i'm down by Niagara Falls (US side), and it's been too cold to do any planting yet.  i did buy a tray of herbs last weekend, but they're not in the ground yet.  i'm mostly giving the vegetable garden a break this year; the soil is probably depleted.   it did poorly last year, so i'm going to put down some compost and let it rest this year.  about the only thing to go in will be the aforementioned herbs and maybe 2 or 3 tomato plants, because i just can't do without tomatoes in the summer.  

the perennial flowers are doing well, except for the peony i planted last year--the rabbits ate it.  

You might want to look into a cover crop this year. Something like clover, vetch, or field peas for nitrogen and then you can till it back into the soil to add back much needed organic matter.

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Terrie

Spent the weekend getting my plants in. Got my hands on some ramps, so seeing they will take to a tiny corner of the yard that mainly grows leaf mulch from the neighbor's cottonwoods. Put in some wild geraniums and bluebells. For edibles, I  kept it small this year. Carrots, green beans, jalapenos, basil and dill. 

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Skyline

Its finally warm enough for me to get planting. The next two weeks I will be planting potatoes, chard, kale, beans, peas, carrots, parsnips, beets, tomatoes, peppers, tomatillo, squash, watermelon and herbs. ... I think that's it. This is my first summer at my new home so my  garden is smaller than idea.

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Tired
Carm_88

I have mostly flowers! Bulbs for the most part. Tulips, daffodils, lilies (dwarf and full sized), peonies (my favourite), pansies, dahlias, persian buttercups, and various hydrangeas! All different colours of annuals will soon be picked out as well!   

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Terrie
On 5/14/2018 at 10:42 AM, Terrie said:

Spent the weekend getting my plants in. Got my hands on some ramps, so seeing they will take to a tiny corner of the yard that mainly grows leaf mulch from the neighbor's cottonwoods. Put in some wild geraniums and bluebells. For edibles, I  kept it small this year. Carrots, green beans, jalapenos, basil and dill. 

Well, something dug up and ate the ramps. Disappointed, but you win some, you lose some. Now to figure out what I can plant in that corner. It's so shaded even creeping charlie won't grow.

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Satisfied
ALM7

@apandaaries, shared this excellent tip in a thread I was reading.  I thought other gardeners may be interested.  Many thanks to @apandaaries for sharing!

Post below ...

Have you researched olla watering systems?  They're ideal for hot climates without much rain, helping get water to roots on a much deeper level than usual: 

https://permaculturenews.org/2010/09/16/ollas-unglazed-clay-pots-for-garden-irrigation/

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louisa05

Basil, spearmint, peppermint and parsley for a super spoiled bunny (we'll use a bit of it for ourselves, too), and tomatoes, green peppers, cucumbers, lettuce and green onions. 

First garden of my own. So happy that we have our own yard and can do it. Husband was skeptical, but now that we are eating fresh produce (lettuce, onions and cucumbers so far, should have tomatoes and peppers very soon), he is thinking of things to add next year. 

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CherylV

We have a pie cherry tree and did raises beds near it. We have corn, tomatoes, zuchinni, tomato’s. Russet potatos, purple potatoes, cArrots,beets, yellow beans, geeen beans, scallions, a few herbs, butternut squash, and had  spinach and lettuce but those are almost done for the season. We also have neighbors with sweet cherry trees that let us pick off the branches that overhang our garden.

I feel like I should have done the lettuce and the spinach in stages because we had too much and then it all bolted. I forgot cucumbers and green peppers this year! Also didn’t do as many herbs as I would like. Loving the fresh produce! I’ve been blanching and freezing green beans and are are eating so much healthier with all the produce! 

Ok except for the cherry pies! But cherry pie made from pie cherries picked ripe off the tree the same day cannot be beat! 

Some of our recent garden bounty! 

F9FE3980-3B11-4964-87A2-303B6D5A3954.jpeg

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