Jump to content
IGNORED

Stacy: Brady Bunch Kids Had Measles, No Biggie


DomWackTroll
 Share

Recommended Posts

What I meant in the example about the costs of immunizations vs costs of medications for complications wasn't about the global profits from the vaccine vs overall profits from the medical treatments if the disease was caught. I was talking about the way it is seemed to be phrased --- the Dr. telling prospective patients that they, personally, will likely incur thousands of dollars in costs. Because they will almost certainly fall ill and will almost certainly have expensive complications. When this is just blatantly untrue.

I think it would be much more effective and more likely to have an actual impact on people's decisions about vaccines - particularly the measles vaccine -- if Dr.s instead said "The reason I think your child should get the shot is that while it's highly unlikely that your child would become so ill that they required extensive treatment -- if he is one of those unlucky ones he could develop an ear or eye complications, or pneumonia. While it's true that there is much less risk now of becoming blind or deaf or dying from these complications -- it's still a possibility because medications aren't always effective -- especially antibiotics, as you've probably heard, many strains of infections are now antibiotic resistant. Since your child has never even been on an antibiotic, he could also have allergic reactions we don't know about that would make it more difficult to effectively treat. So while it's true your child would probably be just fine if he got the measles, in my professional opinion it is safer to get the vaccine.additionally there are many people who are more likely to get very ill with measles who can't be vaccinated because they are immunocompromised. Or are infants too young to be vaccinated. So your child being vaccinated will possibly save someone else from serious problems. There are of course some risks from the vaccine. Here is what they are xxxxx. Here are the chances of getting them xxxxxx. As far as cost of the vaccine versus the cost of treatments, that's actually impossible to say, but these are the reasons that medically I feel it's a good idea.

Yes it's long and detailed. And might lead to lots more discussion. But I think it would be more effective than the current CNN spin of : OMG!!!! Measles!!!You're all going to die!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 110
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • Mama Mia

    7

  • Miggy

    5

  • DuggarsTheEndIsNear

    12

  • August

    5

I guess my concern with the chicken pox vaccine is that it apparently doesn't make a person totally immune, so you end up with people who avoid chicken pox as kids, only to end up getting it as an adult when its a lot worse.

This was my concern too. As I posted on a Duggar vaccine thread earlier, given that it's a relatively new vaccine there have been limited long-term studies. However, the data that is available shows that those who have had the chicken pox vaccine but still catch it have only mild cases of the disease. This was true even for those who caught it as teens or adults when there are usually increased risk of complications. One dose was nearly 100% effective in preventing serious complications even though it was only like 85% effective in preventing the disease. That was the information that took me off the fence on getting the vaccine for my children.

Also, initially they only gave one dose of the vaccine. Since they've started giving a booster between 4-6yrs they've found the "breakthrough" cases have diminished dramatically. (I think it's 95% effective after 2 doses but I forget the exact percents.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That is awful and very, very strange. According to the CDC, before the vaccine about 4 million people a year used to get chickenpox, out of those 4 million about 100 died from complications.

That's a .00000025 chance of dying. That 4 of your cousins were fatalities is incredible. Personally, if I were you, I'd be trying to find out what the hell happened -- because that seems like it must be a genetic condition that could also mean a susceptibility to other problems.

Actually, it's 0.000025, or 0.0025%. Still a very small number. How many other children suffered serious complications, though?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Actually, it's 0.000025, or 0.0025%. Still a very small number. How many other children suffered serious complications, though?

The article I read said it was about one out of 100 had some sort of serious complication. However most of the serious complications were much more serious prior to modern antibiotics and other treatments. Ear infections that used to lead to deafness, conjunctivitis that would lead to blindness, pneumonia. High dosages of Vitamin A apparently are used as treatment for the eye issues, along with topical antibiotics. The most serious issue that there really isn't much help for is encephilitas , which is a rare complication -- but which in rare cases can be fatal. And often leaves permanent neurological disabilities. It's a complication that can happen, rarely, with any virus, and really, really awful.

I didn't bookmark the source --but it was a mainstream medical report on statistics related to measles complications prior to the widespread use of the vaccine, not some anti-vax site,

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This was my concern too. As I posted on a Duggar vaccine thread earlier, given that it's a relatively new vaccine there have been limited long-term studies. However, the data that is available shows that those who have had the chicken pox vaccine but still catch it have only mild cases of the disease. This was true even for those who caught it as teens or adults when there are usually increased risk of complications. One dose was nearly 100% effective in preventing serious complications even though it was only like 85% effective in preventing the disease. That was the information that took me off the fence on getting the vaccine for my children.

Also, initially they only gave one dose of the vaccine. Since they've started giving a booster between 4-6yrs they've found the "breakthrough" cases have diminished dramatically. (I think it's 95% effective after 2 doses but I forget the exact percents.)

I never had chicken pox growing up. The vaccine came out when I was around 16 and my doctor recommended I get it. A few years ago I ended up with a break through infection it was really really mild. I was actually at the doctor for something else and only showed him when he asked why I kept scratching. I had been helping a friend with her kids birthday party the week before and probably picked it up from one of the kids there.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree that it's strange that 4 of your cousins died from chicken pox and others were hospitalized--again, I don't have a ton of contact with people who have kids, but I'd never heard of anyone dying, let alone being hospitalized, for chicken pox. I definitely had/still kind of have the attitude that chicken pox isn't a huge deal. Other than possible scars and the risk of shingles later, does it actually have any lasting effects? (Serious question--I'm not trying to be a smartass here.) I had it as a baby (caught it from my sister), and I always figured that was the way to go; get it over with before you're even old enough to realize anything is happening. (The vaccine didn't come out in the U.S. until I was about 5, so there's also that. I'm guessing a lot of people my age who don't have older siblings got the vaccine, but for me it was too late.)

I guess my concern with the chicken pox vaccine is that it apparently doesn't make a person totally immune, so you end up with people who avoid chicken pox as kids, only to end up getting it as an adult when its a lot worse.

It gets worse the older you get. A friend had it in high school and was beyond miserable, spots in the throat and vagina.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It gets worse the older you get. A friend had it in high school and was beyond miserable, spots in the throat and vagina.

I had chickenpox at 10, so later than average, but pre puberty (so I was lucky that I had it before getting any older). I didn't feel ill at all, and would have gone to school with it and infected all the other kids if my mum hadn't noticed the rash. But then my brothers (16 and 17 at the time) caught it off me and they were both REALLY ill with it. I was sorry I'd been so flippant. Up until then, the chickenpox for me had been a painless ailment with a week off school and the only drag not being allowed to play out or have friends round. I hadn't realised it could actually be quite serious.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the next time someone cites as sitcom show as evidence of measeles is no big deal they should be forced to waterski over a shark like the Fonz, since that was also no big deal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share




×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.