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16strong

So remember that dog Erika Shupe got?

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16strong
Oh God, Erika, noooooooooooo. Dogs do not belong in restaurants unless they are guide dogs.

I thought Erika was a complete and utter germaphobe who would be horrified by a dog in a restaurant...but I guess its okay as long as its her dog and not her house.

My tarantula is quiet too and she will stay on my hand and never touch the ground. Can I bring her to Erika's house?

Not unless you want a dead tarantula and a broken hand. :?

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StellaMarie

I don't think that puppy looks like it's 8 weeks old. :( (But I imagine that a breeder that would give that family a dog isn't so worried about good breeding practices.)

Also,

First we made a trip to the McDonald's play space for free ice cream cones (with the coupons we received from our church's harvest festival in November), then returned home for an easy dinner, ice cream sundays and taco popcorn, game night, then a movie for the older kids and us and fireworks online... Fun and safe and bonding.

Healthy dinner and a fun night! And the sundaes typo makes me LOL.

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SunnyAndrsn

I hope her minions keep being a PITA to her about taking the dog into McDonald's. That's so damn rude. I had a patient's daughter insist that she had to bring her little mop dog everywhere (in a basket strapped to her chest) because otherwise she wouldn't be able to pee. Apparently the dog told her when she needed to pee or else she'd end up with a UTI, and claimed "My bladder almost burst". Yet she had the dog running around the patient's room until we put a stop to it, and told her if it was her service dog, we'd need to see evidence of that or he couldn't be brought in anymore. In all honesty, the dog was very well behaved, but it's a HOSPITAL.

However, he wasn't a trained service dog, and she became very upset with us. I know she hated to be away from her mom, but that damn dog had no business being in her room 24/7. The dog owner had separation anxiety from both her mom (the patient) and the dog.

My German Shepard knew would alert him when his blood sugar got too low, and would wake us during the night if it happened. Still couldn't claim he was a service dog though.

Any bets to how fast Erika's latest dog will last before being re-homed?

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Happy
ViolaSebastian
I don't think that puppy looks like it's 8 weeks old. :( (But I imagine that a breeder that would give that family a dog isn't so worried about good breeding practices.)

Also,

Healthy dinner and a fun night! And the sundaes typo makes me LOL.

Is fireworks online something that should make sense to me? Because it doesn't.

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IronicallyMaeve
I hope her minions keep being a PITA to her about taking the dog into McDonald's. That's so damn rude. I had a patient's daughter insist that she had to bring her little mop dog everywhere (in a basket strapped to her chest) because otherwise she wouldn't be able to pee. Apparently the dog told her when she needed to pee or else she'd end up with a UTI, and claimed "My bladder almost burst". Yet she had the dog running around the patient's room until we put a stop to it, and told her if it was her service dog, we'd need to see evidence of that or he couldn't be brought in anymore. In all honesty, the dog was very well behaved, but it's a HOSPITAL.

However, he wasn't a trained service dog, and she became very upset with us. I know she hated to be away from her mom, but that damn dog had no business being in her room 24/7. The dog owner had separation anxiety from both her mom (the patient) and the dog.

My German Shepard knew would alert him when his blood sugar got too low, and would wake us during the night if it happened. Still couldn't claim he was a service dog though.

Any bets to how fast Erika's latest dog will last before being re-homed?

If you're in the US, you can't actually ask to see proof if it's a service dog. You can ask if it is a service dog, and what tasks it has been trained to perform. That's it. If the dog is misbehaving (not under the handler's control, barking, growling, lunging, urinating, defecating etc.), then it can kicked out.

Service dogs are allowed in most areas of the hospital, but not ORs or burn units. Hospital staff are also not responsible for the dog--they don't have to take it outside to go to the bathroom, feed it, groom it, etc. The disabled person needs to make other arrangements to have the dog's needs taken care of.

The woman is probably faking, but perhaps she lost sensation in her bladder for some reason. Childbirth can cause it.

But yes, pets to not belong in hospitals, restaurants or grocery stores. Period.

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CelticGoddess

If you go to their public Large Families on Purpose Facebook page and scroll down to November 23, she reaches out to her readers asking for training suggestions. Really lengthy to quote, but dog was having separation anxiety, and peeing/pooping all over when left unattended. Pretty sad for dog, but pretty entertaining description of Erika having to scrape poo out of everything in house after an event. So many FJers have rightly predicted how poorly having pets would go in this house. Was older dog just overwhelmed in their home? Hope it's better with new puppy.

It'll be worse with a puppy. My sister got Dallas when she was 2mos old. Sister has Dallas until she was just under a year. Dallas had separation anxiety, was a bully to Capt Jack (Russell because Sparrow would be a stupid name for a dog) and just could not cope being in a 2 dog house. Sister found a very nice home for Dallas and waited another year before getting another dog (because of Capt Jack (Russell, blah blah blah)). She has another younger but not quite puppy dog and it's working out better. Puppies take a lot of patience and time, both of which Erica *smile* doesn't seem willing to invest. My sister was broken hearted that she had to find Dallas a new home. She has only rehomed one dog and that is Dallas.

No one should get a pet (not even an offing Koi) unless and until they can take the time to properly care for them. (and Koi take a lot of care. At least their pond does. I know, I have 5)

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Sad
feministxtian

My sister in law has an obnoxious "furry little puntable object". A couple of years ago, my husband had major surgery. He was supposed to stay in the city he had his surgery for a couple of weeks afterwards due to risk of complications. The idea was that I was going to go back home and go back to work and his sister would stay there with him. Well...where we were staying were apartments specifically for post-transplant patients and had a strict no pets policy. She brought the damn dog...and then got pissed when I told her she had to do something about the damn dog (like it couldn't be in the apartment). If there hadn't been a no pets policy, I'd have brought my dogs down to stay with us...but I left them at home.

Some folks just think that "no-pets" doesn't apply to them...

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DGayle

Dog in child's arms. Child sent to table in corner or in booth. Erika buys food. Just like other people who take their animals places they shouldn't go.

I see this a lot. All it takes is saying "service dog," and managers back off. A lot of people take advantage of this. It's illegal to ask for any verification, and so it's easier for managers to just ignore it. There's nothing they can do. All it would take is kicking out one dog belonging to someone who got a doctor to sign a note that the dog makes someone "feeeel better" to get the US up in arms about a manager not accepting someone with mental illness. Honestly though, it's reached a ridiculous level. If a dog makes you feel happier, when you aren't otherwise mentally ill, you're not going to have a hard time finding a doctor to sign a note giving you special privileges with a dog. And then people who are legitely ill have to deal with it.

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Koala
I hope her minions keep being a PITA to her about taking the dog into McDonald's. That's so damn rude. I had a patient's daughter insist that she had to bring her little mop dog everywhere (in a basket strapped to her chest) because otherwise she wouldn't be able to pee. Apparently the dog told her when she needed to pee or else she'd end up with a UTI, and claimed "My bladder almost burst". Yet she had the dog running around the patient's room until we put a stop to it, and told her if it was her service dog, we'd need to see evidence of that or he couldn't be brought in anymore.

Just as an FYI, according to the ADA there are only 2 questions you are allowed to ask regarding service animals. From their page:

When it is not obvious what service an animal provides, only limited inquiries are allowed. Staff may ask two questions: (1) is the dog a service animal required because of a disability, and (2) what work or task has the dog been trained to perform. Staff cannot ask about the person’s disability, require medical documentation, require a special identification card or training documentation for the dog, or ask that the dog demonstrate its ability to perform the work or task.

A lot of people don't realize it, but they are not required to provide documentation.

Adding link:

http://www.ada.gov/service_animals_2010.htm

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Coco

This is a beautiful documentary on Netflix. The trailer doesn't show my favorite dog though - i can't remember the owner's name, but they had a kind of unspoken bond that's just amazing to see. It's so sad to think that some of the Shupe kids could become attached to a dog like this, and have it taken away because of the Erika's neurosis.

[bBvideo 560,340:wlv635jr]

[/bBvideo]

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meep

Just as an FYI, according to the ADA there are only 2 questions you are allowed to ask regarding service animals. From their page:

A lot of people don't realize it, but they are not required to provide documentation.

Adding link:

http://www.ada.gov/service_animals_2010.htm

I think that's totally ridiculous. Why shouldn't establishments ask to see verification? It could always stay in the dog's vest or be a tag on their collar or something.

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Dizzy
nelliebelle1197

Can anyone see her page? I may have been banned from her Facebook page for my rude comments :)

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Happy
ViolaSebastian
Can anyone see her page? I may have been banned from her Facebook page for. Y comments

Yep, looks like you got the ban hammer. I've fallen down the rabbit hole of Erika's blog this Sunday. Does anyone find her super strict scheduling of what the kids eat to be very unhealthy and dysfunctional? There are nights when they just eat 'snack food' while three of the kids (I'm assuming there's a rotation of which kids) eat at their grandparents. They eat oats for breakfast and salads for lunch Monday through Friday. I'd say it's worse than the Maxwell's eating habits, if that's possible. She doesn't know the difference between 'straight' and 'strait' which drives me bananas.

Also, salads are a blessing.

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Dizzy
nelliebelle1197

Whoooooop! My first banning!

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Walking Cat Bed

Honestly? As much as we'd like all pets to find their forever homes and be showered with the unconditional love they deserve, sometimes, especially with rescues, animal and family just aren't a good fit, no matter how much you try. Almost every reputable rescue will require an adoptive family to contact them if there are problems so they can assess the situation and re-home if necessary. What's the alternative? To break the dog's spirit and/or physically abuse it trying to make it something it's not? So I have no doubt whatsoever that the Shupes' dog is much better off for being given up for re-homing. And most of us probably think the kids would be better off if they could be re-homed too.

Yep -- my roommate and I cared for a dog for about a month, and every day it was more and more obvious that we were not her humans. So we found her humans, and she is SO HAPPY now. (We knew the guy already, his dog and Harley got along well, and he has space for a young, energetic, anxious dog to run and play.)

Also roommate's cat, the Feline Headship, was NOT having a dog in His house. He gets along nicely with my kitten, though -- they chase each other and wrestle and nap on the same blanket.

THAT is rehoming. Erika dumped the dog.

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IronicallyMaeve

I think that's totally ridiculous. Why shouldn't establishments ask to see verification? It could always stay in the dog's vest or be a tag on their collar or something.

Because there is no verification. The are registry sites, but they're scams (you can register your service whale for the low low price of $64.99). There are dozens, maybe hundreds of organizations that train dogs. Dogs can also be trained privately or owner trained. So, where would that verification come from?

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Mango

not to mention, are you going to make people bring in a certificate saying they really NEED that wheelchair, or to use the elevator instead of the stairs, or the big stall in the bathroom?

Because that is what you are asking people who are disabled to do- to verify EVERYWHERE that they are good little crips, that the're REALLY disabled, not like those lying liars who lie, and that they will de facto ASK PERMISSION to exist in public spaces.

Seriously, not cool, dude.

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Koala
not to mention, are you going to make people bring in a certificate saying they really NEED that wheelchair, or to use the elevator instead of the stairs, or the big stall in the bathroom?

Because that is what you are asking people who are disabled to do- to verify EVERYWHERE that they are good little crips, that the're REALLY disabled, not like those lying liars who lie, and that they will de facto ASK PERMISSION to exist in public spaces.

Seriously, not cool, dude.

Honestly, I don't even think they should be able to ask what service the animal provides

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lipstickgoalie

I think that's totally ridiculous. Why shouldn't establishments ask to see verification? It could always stay in the dog's vest or be a tag on their collar or something.

They can't do that because:

A) it is illegal.

B) it not anyone else's god damn business.

C) in the United States there is no "official" certification for a service dog. There are several highly reputable organizations such as Guide Dogs International and Assitance Dogs International but anyone can train a dog and say that it is a service dog or emotional assistance dog.

D) see point B again

My husband has a PTSD service dog. I am not about to explain to every random person exactly why husband has a dog and neither is he. It would be no more appropriate than asking someone in a wheelchair exactly why there are using it and "so what's wrong with you?" He/we don't mind explaining if someone asks politely but if we are in a hurry or don't feel like talking about it we won't, and certainly don't have to.

All that being said if the dog is well behaved it should be mostly invisible. If my husbands dog gets even the slightest bit disruptive they excuse themselves from the situation until everyone is calmer. Poor service animal behavior in public is usually a sign of one of two thing- a poorly trained dog/ inexperienced trainer or a fake service dog. And the fake service dog thing happens. A lot. I am also not a fan of "emotional assistance" dogs because most are not well trained and make legit service dog users look bad.

Also, contrary to popular belief service dogs are not required by law to wear a vest or any identifying markings at all. (Aside from rabies tags of course). In the 6 months of training with and the 4 months he has had the dog full time there have been exactly two times my husband has used public accomedation with the dog out of vest twice. Once to bring me a heater from home when the penalty box heater went out at work (which wasn't a big deal because everyone at the rink is up on the situation.) And a second time when he had to run into a rest stop because of a bathroom emergency for both he and the dog. (Dogs needs come first and the pup does not ever bathroom while wearing his vest. And Mr Goalie really had to go) Point being that according to ADA Law not only is an establishment barred from asking why the dog is there, they can not insist that the dog be in a vest

While I am still up on my soap box NOT ALL SERIVCE DOGS ARE GUIDE DOGS! In fact the majority of service dogs are not guide dogs.

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Dizzy
nelliebelle1197
She's deleted the pic

So you mean I am not banned?? :cussing: :angry-devil:

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Koala

B) it not anyone else's god damn business.

That x about a million

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meep

They can't do that because:

A) it is illegal.

B) it not anyone else's god damn business.

C) in the United States there is no "official" certification for a service dog. There are several highly reputable organizations such as Guide Dogs International and Assitance Dogs International but anyone can train a dog and say that it is a service dog or emotional assistance dog.

D) see point B again

My husband has a PTSD service dog. I am not about to explain to every random person exactly why husband has a dog and neither is he. It would be no more appropriate than asking someone in a wheelchair exactly why there are using it and "so what's wrong with you?" He/we don't mind explaining if someone asks politely but if we are in a hurry or don't feel like talking about it we won't, and certainly don't have to.

All that being said if the dog is well behaved it should be mostly invisible. If my husbands dog gets even the slightest bit disruptive they excuse themselves from the situation until everyone is calmer. Poor service animal behavior in public is usually a sign of one of two thing- a poorly trained dog/ inexperienced trainer or a fake service dog. And the fake service dog thing happens. A lot. I am also not a fan of "emotional assistance" dogs because most are not well trained and make legit service dog users look bad.

Also, contrary to popular belief service dogs are not required by law to wear a vest or any identifying markings at all. (Aside from rabies tags of course). In the 6 months of training with and the 4 months he has had the dog full time there have been exactly two times my husband has used public accomedation with the dog out of vest twice. Once to bring me a heater from home when the penalty box heater went out at work (which wasn't a big deal because everyone at the rink is up on the situation.) And a second time when he had to run into a rest stop because of a bathroom emergency for both he and the dog. (Dogs needs come first and the pup does not ever bathroom while wearing his vest. And Mr Goalie really had to go) Point being that according to ADA Law not only is an establishment barred from asking why the dog is there, they can not insist that the dog be in a vest

While I am still up on my soap box NOT ALL SERIVCE DOGS ARE GUIDE DOGS! In fact the majority of service dogs are not guide dogs.

Sorry if my phrase seemed offense or anything, it wasn't intended at all. Both my grandmother and aunt were/are legally blind and have had service dogs. My sister also has a severe illness and we've been trying to get her one for a long time. I was meaning more like, just something to identify that it is, indeed, a service dog (and not just some random dog a random person decided to bring someplace for fun) and that is that, no questions asked, just as a way to actually avoid those questions. But I didn't even know there's no legal certification requirements for service dogs so that throws that idea out the window autotmatically.

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lipstickgoalie

Sorry if my phrase seemed offense or anything, it wasn't intended at all. Both my grandmother and aunt were/are legally blind and have had service dogs. My sister also has a severe illness and we've been trying to get her one for a long time. I was meaning more like, just something to identify that it is, indeed, a service dog (and not just some random dog a random person decided to bring someplace for fun) and that is that, no questions asked, just as a way to actually avoid those questions. But I didn't even know there's no legal certification requirements for service dogs so that throws that idea out the window autotmatically.

Sorry if I came off super bitchy. We have had to deal with a raft of crap pertaining to Mr Goalie's service dog. Mainly from the military but also with his family. They went the whole "must be nice to take your pet with you anywhere", trumped that with "PTSD isn't real. Everyone came back from Vietnam just fine" and closed at with "all you are doing is sitting on your ass wasting my tax dollars".

Forgive me for my earlier bluntness. I have been fighting the VA, the National Guard Bureau, the U.S. Airforce and my husband's jackass family for far too long.

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Inthemadhouse

Not all service dogs are properly trained with an organization. When I was training Gimmick, I worked under the supervision of a trainer, but his tasks were specific to me and my needs, and sending him away to be trained was counterproductive.

Yes, he was the puppy or teenager in Target, or Walmart, or the movie theater. He was learning how to function in a world where he would be required to work around all the distractions present in those places.

I did not put a vest on him, nor am I obviously disabled. He is also not a breed known for service work, so we did get rude stares or comments. Most places were accommodating.

Sadly, he washed out of being a good service dog and has been relegated to pet status. He is no longer allowed in such places, because he is not doing anything to make my life easier.

People who drag pets into stores and allow them to act like demons are making things harder for those of us who need the service animal. Every puppy pooping on the floor (never once did he do that in a store), every dog who bothers other customers, every growl or snap is one more nail in the coffin of being able to use our dogs in public.

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