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Anyone good with geneology?


FJismyheadship

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FJismyheadship

I have been using Ancestry to trace back family. I have most lines traced back a good long way... as far back as the 1300s in one line.

 

However, I have a relatively recent dead end which is bugging me. I found my grandfathers father. He doesn't have the middle name we thought he had, but everything else lines up. I even spoke with someone else who was doing the family line and they were able to tell me enough about the man that I was 90% sure was my great grandfather that it sort of cemented it. Well, so we go back to my great great grandparents, and its a dead end. They came to America from Canada in 1893. The only basis I have for that is the census records. GGF was born in Ohio, and then they moved to New York somewhere along the way. I cannot get past them, cant find the crossing records, cant find birth records for anyone... just census records that start around 1910. I can't even find GGgrandmothers maiden name! Theres not even any records that the man in question was ever married to my great grandmother, with the exception of one census record where they both say married. It says he doesn't have a job, she is working as servant, and my six year old grandfather is with his mothers parents.

 

If anyone can help me, I would greatly appreciate it. I will gladly give all the information I have, and maybe someone else can turn something up/

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CallmeChaCha

Have you tried finding their death records? Sometimes they mention where someone was born. If they passed away after 1935, you might be able to find them in the Social Security Death Index. I don't think that says where people were born, but it (sometimes) has the last place they lived, then you could search the last place they lived (county records and such) for the death record. Also, have you looked through state census records? Did you inspect all federal census records for each person to see if it says where that person was born? I'm not familiar with the U.S. Census records, but the Mexico 1930 Census records sometimes have the state the person was born in. Maybe the U.S. Census records have something similar? Also, if you have any information of where/what they worked in, that might be helpful. For example, California has records of railroad workers. As far checking crossing records, did you also check passenger lists? Maybe they sailed here? (That sounds a bit strange, but it's possible, right? :D ) It may also be possible that they changed their name(s) upon arrival. Maybe a quick Google search of the last name origin would be helpful. Last thing: you may not be able to search Canadian records based on the membership level you have on Ancestry. That may be another thing to look at.

That's all I can think of for now. Good luck!

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  • 1 year later...
Sobeknofret

I know this is over a year later, but did you find anything? I'm studying to become a professional genealogist, and I can try to help if you're still stuck. Nota bene: I am *not* a professional! Just trying to become one eventually.

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nana sew dear

I know this is over a year later, but did you find anything? I'm studying to become a professional genealogist, and I can try to help if you're still stuck. Nota bene: I am *not* a professional! Just trying to become one eventually.

That is great Sobeknofret!  It's something I've thought about too. I guess it would be better if I lived near a major records library but I do LOVE the research.

Good luck with your task!  PS I also want to know if they found anything.

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Sobeknofret

That is great Sobeknofret!  It's something I've thought about too. I guess it would be better if I lived near a major records library but I do LOVE the research.

Good luck with your task!  PS I also want to know if they found anything.

Try the Family History Centers in your area! They're run by the Mormon church, and they have tons of stuff on microfilm, and can order more from the Family History Library in Utah. They also usually have genealogists on staff to help with the most perplexing things. They're a fantastic resource, and the fees are usually just for making copies of documents. Although they're not as good as going to Indiana or to Utah in person, the FHC's are really really good.

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Try the Family History Centers in your area! They're run by the Mormon church, and they have tons of stuff on microfilm, and can order more from the Family History Library in Utah. They also usually have genealogists on staff to help with the most perplexing things. They're a fantastic resource, and the fees are usually just for making copies of documents. Although they're not as good as going to Indiana or to Utah in person, the FHC's are really really good.

Another genealogist here. I would suggest the Family History Centers in your area only if a local public library doesn't have an affiliation with the church. I live in a capital city with a metro area population of almost a million, and the official Family History Center is only open 2 days a week for a few hours at a time. However, my public library has a local history room, and I can order FamilySearch microfilm online to be delivered there the same way I could to an "official" FHC. And it's open 9-9, six days a week! And I should add it's not records relevant to my local area I'm ordering -- I've primarily ordered church records from 16th-19th century Switzerland through FamilySearch. You have access to the same catalog that you would at any FHC.

It's hard to identify through the FamilySearch website whether your library has this option until you're in the microfilm ordering checkout page (where you can search by zip code for the delivery location), but usually your local library's site will tell you.

PM me if you want any guidance. 

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nana sew dear

I love the FHC!  They have one here and it was larger than most I had been to and was in a building by itself.  As of last year they decided to move it to the stake center and it has fewer hours.  Sigh...

It was at that library that I found a file card from a funeral home in Baker City, OR that had my great grand uncle's name on it.  It has turned into quite the story and I'm afraid that most of the folks who research this line didn't think it was accurate. I made it my mission to prove the accuracy of my info. So much fun!

Thanks for the ideas!  If you have eastern Oregon, Washington, or western Idaho questions, please let me know.

Another genealogist here. I would suggest the Family History Centers in your area only if a local public library doesn't have an affiliation with the church. I live in a capital city with a metro area population of almost a million, and the official Family History Center is only open 2 days a week for a few hours at a time. However, my public library has a local history room, and I can order FamilySearch microfilm online to be delivered there the same way I could to an "official" FHC. And it's open 9-9, six days a week! And I should add it's not records relevant to my local area I'm ordering -- I've primarily ordered church records from 16th-19th century Switzerland through FamilySearch. You have access to the same catalog that you would at any FHC.

It's hard to identify through the FamilySearch website whether your library has this option until you're in the microfilm ordering checkout page (where you can search by zip code for the delivery location), but usually your local library's site will tell you.

PM me if you want any guidance. 

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