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Dollypeeps
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I have always wanted to do this but want to do small blanket type quilts as a beginner but need either a half decent website or something I can download or even read. I'm UK

 

I don't mind if I hand sew or machine but it does have to be small to begin with of course.

 

So someone take pity on me and help me out here.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hmmm....I don't have any books or websites to suggest, but a good way to get you feet wet is just joining squares of fabric in rows. (Example: http://teachinggoodthings.com/wp-conten ... 07-037.jpg) That way you can practice seam allowance and making sure things line up. Then tie-quilt it. (http://www.wikihow.com/Hand-Tie-a-Quilt) Simple and easy. Once you get the hang of it, you can move on to more complicated stuff.

Or if you want to do a more complicated pattern, start with a pillow.

Either way, you're less likely to get overwhelmed and quit halfway through.

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  • 1 month later...

My mother in law makes beautiful quilts. I asked her to teach me, as I want to make one or two or three to Hope Lodge, for letting us stay there. If I get good at it, it could be a regular thing. They do them as a silent auction. We stayed there for three months, so in my head, I owe them around $2500. (So, ten very nice quilts) She is more than happy to teach me and has three different sewing machines, depending on what I want to do.

She said it isn't that hard and she has a garage full of scraps (she does) so I wouldn't have to invest a ton of money to get started. I am just worried I would make something so incredibly bad that no one would bid on it and it would be not worth making. She claims this is impossible. I really don't want to waste even her cheap fabric on it if it is going to be bad.

My plan is that it have a nice border and be squares on one side with batting and then felt or something on the other side. I wanted to do one with the United States all in different shapes (each state a different color) but that would obviously need to be hand-sewn and need to take a lot of time. But that would also obviously sell for more. Maybe a world one after that.

I just want them to be unique enough that people will pay more for them. How do I find patterns?

Thanks!

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  • 6 months later...

Google is your friend there is loads out there and free.

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  • 4 months later...

I have such a hard time learning sewing things if I'm not actively hands-on, with someone there to check that I'm understanding the directions. For that reason, I found that taking a two-session basic quilting class was a huge help for me. I was able to make a lovely quilted pillow cover. When I tried to do it with only videos and books, all I made were tears and cries of exasperation.

If you are a hands-on learner, I highly suggest considering a short beginner course!

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  • 3 months later...

Strip quilting is a good way to start. There are many cool patterns you can try. Look up "Strip quilting" or "strip piecing" and all you need is a straightedge, a good rotary cutter, and a consistent eye to your cutting and seaming.

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  • 1 month later...
  • 1 month later...

I suggest The Missouri Star Quilt Company. She is a delight to watch and she makes it simple. She has her own youtube video and you can shop at her store (on-line or in person if you ever come across the pond and find Missouri). She has the "jelly roll" race (strip piecing) and tons of videos on how to do things. There is another channel thru her company called: "3 Dudes Quilt" and that is geared towards "man" sewing but it's cool. The back story of the Missouri Star Quilt company is neat. She basically saved the town with her business.

https://www.youtube.com/user/MissouriQuiltCo

Here is the info on shipping across the pond if you ever purchase from them:

International

Canada ships for $20 flat

The rest of the world, you get this -

Orders up to $100 - Ships for $25 flat

Orders up to $200 - Ships for $35 flat

Orders $200 or more - They all ship for $45 flat

Cool? Cool.

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I agree with TheKate - tie quilting is the easiest way to get started. Make a baby quilt or a wall hanging quilt and go from there. I was blessed with a grandmother who could do everything from quilting to sewing to needlepoint, and taught me all of the crafts. Knitting is my very favorite, tatting and smocking are probably my least favorite - quilting isn't my cup of tea either, but I've made small quilts for friends. I also really enjoy counted cross stitch.

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  • 2 months later...
I suggest The Missouri Star Quilt Company. She is a delight to watch and she makes it simple. She has her own youtube video and you can shop at her store (on-line or in person if you ever come across the pond and find Missouri). She has the "jelly roll" race (strip piecing) and tons of videos on how to do things. There is another channel thru her company called: "3 Dudes Quilt" and that is geared towards "man" sewing but it's cool. The back story of the Missouri Star Quilt company is neat. She basically saved the town with her business.

https://www.youtube.com/user/MissouriQuiltCo

Here is the info on shipping across the pond if you ever purchase from them:

I agree - Missouri Star Quilt Co has some great tutorials!

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  • 1 month later...

I am a quilter here! I learned to sew a long time ago, but didn't sew for about 19 years, and then decided one day I wanted to quilt!

These are some of the really simple quilts I have made, I have links to all the quilts I found on pinterest if you want to know how to make them.

https://biasbairquilts.wordpress.com/

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  • 2 weeks later...

Have any US/Canadian FJ quilters been doing the Row by Row patterns? I've collected the RxR license plates, and am planning to do a big quilt with the 50 US plates. I'd love to see the rows that have been collected if you've been getting them!

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  • 1 month later...

I've found my people!!!!  I'm a quilter and a vintage sewing machine hoarder  collector.  I currently, as of this post, have 54 vintage machines (pre 1980), 1 new Brother, and 1 15 year old embroidery machine or and an overlocker.  I blog about quilting and have a youtube channel.  If you want links PM me.  I don't really want them here just so I can keep my FJ world separate from my blogging career.  I can't afford to piss off any readers if they connect the dots. lol  

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  • 2 weeks later...

I'm pretty new to quilting but am surprised how nice they've turned out so far. I agree strip is easiest--look up log cabin patterns. I watch quilting shows but not sure what's available in the uk. Really like the book Quilt as you go made modern by Jera Brandwig--cheap e version-makes it so much easier. Also Big Block Quilts by Jeanne Throckmorton. Once you get going it's easier than you think. 

Have fun!

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  • 1 month later...

Did you ever get started quilting? I taught myself how to quilt by just buying a Quick Quilts magazine and following a simple pattern. That led to a quilting obsession, a longarm business, and a whole lot of stacks of fabric in my basement. My mom, for whom I made that first quilt, is now obsessed with quilting, as well. She was a home ec teacher and had me sewing from the time I could sit up, but it was all clothing construction and such. Never knew what we were missing. :)

My current project is creating patterns for a couple of small quilts since my boys have decided to learn to sew this year. They're going to piece little wall hangings that will hold their 4H achievement pins.

On 10/25/2015 at 10:49 PM, grandmadugger said:

I've found my people!!!!  I'm a quilter and a vintage sewing machine hoarder  collector.  I currently, as of this post, have 54 vintage machines (pre 1980), 1 new Brother, and 1 15 year old embroidery machine or and an overlocker.  I blog about quilting and have a youtube channel.  If you want links PM me.  I don't really want them here just so I can keep my FJ world separate from my blogging career.  I can't afford to piss off any readers if they connect the dots. lol  

Message me your blog address! I love vintage machines, too, but don't have a collection. I have my great-grandmother's 1910 treadle, a red-eye treadle that I bought at an auction, my grandma's 1957 Singer, plus 3 newer machines (Pfaff, Janome, and Brother sewing/embroidery). I had a Kenquilt longarm, as well, but sold it while we were in the super-busy adoption/having a surprise baby year. Now I have my eye on a Gammill. Or maybe a Bernina. But probably a Gammill.

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Anyone remember a sewing machine that wasn't a treadle? When I was little I got what I was told my mom's grandma's machine. It wasn't a treadle; it worked by cranking a wheel on the side, and it made a chain stitch. 

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17 hours ago, patsymae said:

Anyone remember a sewing machine that wasn't a treadle? When I was little I got what I was told my mom's grandma's machine. It wasn't a treadle; it worked by cranking a wheel on the side, and it made a chain stitch. 

I don't have a chain stitch machine but I do have two hand cranks.  A singer 28 that came as a hand crank and a singer 99 that we retrofitted into a hand crank.

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On 12/4/2013 at 0:59 AM, Stephanie66 said:

I am just worried I would make something so incredibly bad that no one would bid on it and it would be not worth making. She claims this is impossible.

I would agree with her. All you have to do is claim it's "art" and you're good to go.

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  • 9 months later...

For those without a longarm, Google "quilt as you go". You cut a square of batting a half inch smaller than your quilt block and a square of your backing fabric the same size as your block. Stack them all together and quilt, leaving space around the edges so you can sew your blocks together. 

I'm currently working on a "commando" quilt for our California King bed. We don't like a heavy blanket, even in winter, so it's a quilt top and flannel back without any filling. It's going to be ginormous so quilting as I go makes more sense than trying to wrestle 10' × 10' through my standard machine. 

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