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Quilters unite! plus: recommended sewing machine


AuntCloud
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Ahoy, fellow quilters!

 

Do come in, we have a fresh pot of coffee and some chocolate chip cookies.

 

I can't really call myself a quilter with a capital A, but I started several quilts, have finished some of them, and am epically stuck on a ginormous queen-sized log cabin that took me two days to baste but needs quilting.

 

On to my question: my old hand-me-down Kenmore is not doing too well. The bobbin tension is all over the place and I would like a newer machine. Which good basic models can you recommend that come with a walking foot and can handle larger quilts besides basic sewing projects? No fancy embroidery or a gazillion stitches required.

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I'm a beginning quilter but am enjoying the hobby. The lady that started teaching me makes quilts out of old T-shirts. What she's shown is really neat and one day I may try it.

Sewing machine wise I have no idea what's the best for quilting. I use my old machine I bought when I was 17.

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How much do you want to spend on a new machine? My mother, who should be the patron saint of quilters since she has mad skills, got a new Husqvarna (yes, like the chain saws) that I am in mad lust with. My poor Bernina machine Brunhilde looks and sew like straight up crap compared to the new machine.

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I'm about to start my first ever quilt (made from my late gma's dresses) but have thus far only managed to cut the dresses into strips! I'm planning on doing crazy patchwork, or would that be too advanced? (I do have a GCSE in Textiles but that's about it)

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I'm about to start my first ever quilt (made from my late gma's dresses) but have thus far only managed to cut the dresses into strips! I'm planning on doing crazy patchwork, or would that be too advanced? (I do have a GCSE in Textiles but that's about it)

I've never made a crazy quilt before. When I was getting my lessons I started out with a nine patch. What about something like that for practice?

This page also has some nice quilt blocks on it. Music plays on each page so if you're at work you might want to turn your speakers down.

http://quilterscache.com/QuiltBlocksGalore.html

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I upgraded to a Bernina after about 11 years of dealing with my PITA Singer. It was expensive but oh so worth it!

If you are going to use the machine for quilting, make sure it includes the walking foot, the 1/4" foot, and the spring-loaded quilting or darning foot. I also looked for one that made a nice buttonhole stitch.

I make t shirt quilts a lot so if you have any questions, I am happy to advise.

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I've never made a crazy quilt before. When I was getting my lessons I started out with a nine patch. What about something like that for practice?

This page also has some nice quilt blocks on it. Music plays on each page so if you're at work you might want to turn your speakers down.

http://quilterscache.com/QuiltBlocksGalore.html

Thanks Claddagh, I have "The Patchwork and Quilting Bible" which shows you how to crazy patchwork. I have done some patchwork before, so it's not a completely foreign concept to me, quilting however, is!

:lol: I don't work in the conventional sense, as I'm still at uni - man, this makes me sound lazy! But thanks for the heads up about the music!

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I'm about to start my first ever quilt (made from my late gma's dresses) but have thus far only managed to cut the dresses into strips! I'm planning on doing crazy patchwork, or would that be too advanced? (I do have a GCSE in Textiles but that's about it)

Never made a crazy quilt before, but love the name!

I don't think it's too advanced, at all. The one thing I know is to make individual blocks separately, then put them together.

A friend just bought this, which has some nice quilting features.

http://www.amazon.com/Brother-XL-3750-C ... B000VGAMU6

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I upgraded to a Bernina after about 11 years of dealing with my PITA Singer. It was expensive but oh so worth it!

If you are going to use the machine for quilting, make sure it includes the walking foot, the 1/4" foot, and the spring-loaded quilting or darning foot. I also looked for one that made a nice buttonhole stitch.

I make t shirt quilts a lot so if you have any questions, I am happy to advise.

Thanks! :dance: what do you use the spring-loaded foot for? Do you think it's doable to quilt a queen-sized log-cabin on a regular machine?

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Thanks! :dance: what do you use the spring-loaded foot for? Do you think it's doable to quilt a queen-sized log-cabin on a regular machine?

I do all my quilting by hand, but I just had to toss in a good word for my Pfaff machine. I have one of the lower end ones, but it's been a good machine for me. I do a lot of crate pads for dogs, which is sort of similar materialwise to quilting and the Pfaff has handled everything I've thrown at it. I think probably the thickest thing I've ever tried is 2 layers of berber (that fake sheepskin stuff) and a double layer of 10oz 1.25" loft batting and it did great on that.

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Never made a crazy quilt before, but love the name!

I don't think it's too advanced, at all. The one thing I know is to make individual blocks separately, then put them together.

A friend just bought this, which has some nice quilting features.

http://www.amazon.com/Brother-XL-3750-C ... B000VGAMU6

I've started it! So far so good, from the instructions in my book just sew scraps together until you've reached you desired size. I like it because I'm not very good at following instructions properly when it comes to crafty stuff... :oops:

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Which good basic models can you recommend that come with a walking foot and can handle larger quilts besides basic sewing projects? No fancy embroidery or a gazillion stitches required.

Vintage Singer 201. A modern even-feed foot will not work with it (feed dogs are too narrow) and an original 'penguin' walking foot would be near-impossible to find and would cost you an arm and a leg, but the adjustable presser foot does the job just fine. I have quilted a thick eiderdown style quilt with 8oz wadding, with not a tuck or a wobble in sight. Also, you can get loads more under the arm than many modern machines. I got mine for £25ish and it out-performs my computerised model on everything heavy duty. Also, the motor can be easily unbolted and switched over to a hand crank, for near silent sewing in front of the tv. It's great for FMQ too, but obviously you need the motor for that.

nmYNXhAPT5M

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I just got a Brother XR1300 for Christmas. I haven't done any quilting on it yet (but it came with a quilting foot), but it does lots of pretty stitches that I have played with! It also does automatic buttonholes.

IMG_2240_zps56e302ca.jpg

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Can I get more info on the T-shirt quilts and the crate pads for dogs? How are they done? Where would I get more info on-line if needed?

I've had 2 sewing machines in the last 30-ish years, both Wal-Mart specials. They've been used mostly for hemming and tailoring as everyone in my family is on the short side, but I have done about 10 quilts on them, including 2 stitch-in-the-ditch queen-sized jean quilts (backed with flannel - silly me, next time I'll tie them).

I am so heartened to see so many beginning quilters. I made my first quilts about 14-15 years ago but would still classify my quilting skills as beginner-level. My favourite quilts have been made with my children's recycled jeans and PJs

I'd like to see some examples of people's work. As I mentioned, mine is beginner level, but I am proud to be self-taught and to have done any at all.

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This is from greekchat.com

For any of you wanting to do it yourself, these are easy instructions from my GLO's magazine. My own way is in CAPS.

Directions:

Select 30 T-shirts. Using a 14" square piece of glass (available at a lumbar yard) as a template, cut the fronts from the T-shirts using a rotary cutter. The glass is heavy enough to hold the shirt while cutting and transparent so you can see if the shirt is centered. Cut a 14" square of light-weight muslin and stitch to the back of each block to stabilize it.

I USE A CLEAR OMNIGRID 15 X 15 QUILTING RULER INSTEAD OF GLASS. I USE GRIDDED (MARKED IN 1 INCH SQUARES) FUSIBLE INTERFACING INSTEAD OF STITCHING LIGHTWEIGHT MUSLIN. IT STABILIZES THE STRETCHY T-SHIRT FABRIC BETTER. BE CAREFUL WHEN IRONING! SOMETIMES THE DESIGN MIGHT MELT IF IT'S NOT SILKSCREENED.

Sew T-shirt blocks together, matching corners. Or, for a different look, sew a strip on each side of the square, then sew the strips together. Alberta first used a 3 ½" wide black strip, taking ½" seams. On another, she accented the black strip with a 3 ½" gold square at the corners – using Missouri school colors.

DITTO

To finish the top, lay the quilt and backing on the floor, right sides together. Pin, then stitch all around, leaving a 24" opening in one of the long sides. Return the quilt to the floor. Cut the batting to the exact size and lay it on top of the quilt. (Alberta used extra loft.) With a friend, roll the quilt backing and batting from corners as tightly as possible – rolling toward the opening. Stretch the opening over the huge roll of cotton and fabric and turn your quilt right side out. Unroll it carefully, working out any bumps or wrinkles. Stitch closed.

I SAFETY-PIN THE QUILT SANDWICH (BACKING, BATTING, TOP) TOGETHER, QUILT IT AND BIND IT RATHER THAN MAKING A QUILT PILLOW. IT CAN BE DIFFICULT TO GET ALL THE WRINKLES OUT FROM THE TURN-RIGHTSIDE-OUT METHOD

For tying you can use yarn, all six strands of embroidery floss, pearl cotton, or heavy crochet thread. The quilt should be tied about every four inches in a square or surgeon's knot. Alberta tied her quilts on the wrong side, but says that tying on either side would work.

I MACHINE QUILT IT.

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I'd like to start doing some hand quilting. I can't pay attention to anything if my hands aren't busy, and I'm a pretty competent hand sewer. I've been knitting scarves lately and I'd like to expand my repertoire to hats and gloves (I figure if I sit and make a giant pile of stuff all year I can just donate them to a homeless shelter come winter, what with living in the frozen north and all), but I've always liked the idea of making quilt blocks by hand. I blame little house books. :)

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Quilters!! *does happy dance*

I've been quilting about 5 years, after watching my grandma handquilt all my life. For the first few years I used an old Brother portable, which sewed nicely and quilted small quilts very well. About 18 months ago I got a Juki TL98 which is a-mazing. I think if I could figure out how to get two pieces of wood under the presser foot that sucker would sew right through 'em. It has a wider throat, so it's a bit easier to do a large quilt. I'm currently quilting a full-size bed quilt, and it's a lot of work but more than doable. I think I'd need a different table set up to do a larger quilt; something to hold the weight while quilting would do the trick.

My first quilt was a twin-size done in a rail-fence pattern: straight cutting, straight sewing, easy-peasy for a beginner.

I've done mosty machine quilting (faster), but have done two hand-quilted ones too. Very satisfying, and I gained a new respect for my grandma.

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Thanks! :dance: what do you use the spring-loaded foot for? Do you think it's doable to quilt a queen-sized log-cabin on a regular machine?

The spring-loaded foot is for free-motion quilting. This is when you drop the feed dogs and then you can push the quilt in all directions under the needle.

My machine has a regular arm and I have quilted quilts up to 108". It would be easier if I had a midarm or longarm but that's not in the budget. Pin-baste a ton and tightly roll the part that's going to be to the right of the needle.

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  • 2 months later...
How much do you want to spend on a new machine? My mother, who should be the patron saint of quilters since she has mad skills, got a new Husqvarna (yes, like the chain saws) that I am in mad lust with. My poor Bernina machine Brunhilde looks and sew like straight up crap compared to the new machine.

My bbf has a Husqvarna and I love to use it. I've never had any issues with it. I have a europro model that about ten years old. It's gotten a lot of use including lots of machine quilting and has never given me a problem. I think the important thing is to get a model with all metal construction on the internal parts.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I love piecing and putting together quilt tops, but I haven't quilted any of my own creations yet. I have a nice lady in the next town who does the quilting on her giant long arm machine.

Here's one that I just finished this week. It is accompanied by a sad tale. I finished the whole thing and realized that rows four and five were reversed! My lovely seam ripper got quite a nice workout on that one.

20130603_173404-1_zpsda54b981.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...

I sew almost every day, and love to piece quilts. I have a Baby Lock Decorator's Choice, and it is my favorite machine ever. It is a workhorse! It has a quilting foot, but I rarely use it. I send anything lap quilt or larger off to be quilted because I just don't have a good hand at that.

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  • 2 weeks later...

What a cute quilt! made me chuckle, the one problem I see - I couldn't possibly fall asleep with all these Dr. Seuss characters dancing on my bed!

I am super duper excited: tomorrow I will pick up my very first queen-sized log cabin, pieced almost entirely by hand, from the quilter. I thought I'll hand-quilt it but it was a beast, very large and took over my living room (and the cat didn't help, either). My mom had laid it upon my heart to just have it professionally quilted. I went to meet two quilters, liked one's style better, and just got the call. I'll show pictures of my new baby as soon as she's here. I'm so proud and happy - this was a major undertaking.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I just recently started quilting, and LOVE IT! I started with rag quilts for my nieces babies, but I think I'm ready to try my hand at something a little more complicated. My dining room is now a sewing room, and we eat at the coffee table in the living room now.

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  • 2 weeks later...

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