Jump to content
  • Sky
  • Blueberry
  • Slate
  • Blackcurrant
  • Watermelon
  • Strawberry
  • Orange
  • Banana
  • Apple
  • Emerald
  • Chocolate
  • Charcoal

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'genealogy'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Discussions
    • Quiver Full of Snark
    • Quiver Full of Politics
    • Quiverfull of Corona Virus Discussion
    • Wide World of Snark
    • SOTDRT
    • Quiver Full of Worldly Distractions
    • Archived Topical Threads
    • Recommended Reading
  • Family Discussion Forums
  • Cooking Club's General Discussion
  • Cooking Club's Recipes
  • Cooking Club's Quiverfull of Food and Beverages
  • Gardening Club's Topics
  • Music Club's Forum
  • Coloring & Art Club's Coloring Forum
  • Coloring & Art Club's Drawing Forum
  • Coloring & Art Club's Painting Forum
  • Coloring & Art Club's Art Journaling
  • Coloring & Art Club's General Art Chat
  • NaNoWriMo's Forum
  • NaNoWriMo's Critiques
  • Book Club's Forum
  • Craft Club's Other Crafts
  • Craft Club's Crocheting Forum
  • Craft Club's Knitting Forum
  • Craft Club's Sewing & Quilting Forum
  • Pets Club's Other Pets
  • Pets Club's Horse Forum
  • Pets Club's Cat Forum
  • Pets Club's Dog Forum
  • Pets Club's Pet Loss
  • Genealogy Club's Forum
  • Genealogy Club's Topics
  • Genealogy Club's Quiverfull of Genealogy
  • Religion Club's General Forum
  • Religion Club's Bible Forum
  • Religion Club's Religious Texts
  • Religion Club's Picking a church
  • Lori Alexander Accountability Group's Forum
  • Lori Alexander Accountability Group's Contradictions
  • Lori Alexander Accountability Group's Power of the Transformed Wife
  • Writers Group's Forum
  • Writers Group's Journaling
  • Writers Group's Critiques
  • Writers Group's Topics
  • Frugal Living Club's Forum
  • Frugal Living Club's Tips & Tricks
  • Frugal Living Club's Shopping
  • Frugal Living Club's Food/Eating
  • Work at Home Group's Forum
  • Money Group's Budgeting
  • Money Group's Investing
  • Money Group's Saving
  • Money Group's Forum
  • Continuing Education's General Discussion
  • Non Theists's Media (books, movies, music, etc.)
  • Non Theists's General
  • Non Theists's Polls and Play
  • Doll Collectors Group's Ball Jointed Dolls
  • Doll Collectors Group's American Girl
  • Doll Collectors Group's Doll Chat
  • Doll Collectors Group's Refurbishing
  • Doll Collectors Group's Accessories
  • Weight Loss and Fitness Club's Fitness Forum
  • Weight Loss and Fitness Club's Weight Loss Forum
  • Weight Loss and Fitness Club's Recipes
  • Weight Loss and Fitness Club's Healthy Eating
  • Travel Club's Canadian Destinations
  • Travel Club's US Destinations
  • Travel Club's Travel Tips
  • Travel Club's Asian Destinations
  • Travel Club's Africian Destinations
  • Travel Club's Travel General Discussion
  • Travel Club's European Destinations
  • Travel Club's Australian Destinations
  • LHOP and Laura Ingalls Wilder Discussion's Topics

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Found 30 results

  1. So I discovered a lot of ancestry.com leads that led me to newspapers.com (and you can save the clippings over to ancestry). FYI Newspapers does offer a 7-day free trial which I'm taking advantage of at the moment. So yesterday I looked up my paternal family surname (sort of common in the US) in the small town my father is from. While I was hoping for obituaries for his mom, sister and father what I found was a series of divorce announcements, etc for my paternal grandparents (not a shock since I had figured out from evidence as well as a discussion with my uncle about them). (oh and they married, divorced/split up/she went with his brother for a while/then got back together and had my dad and uncle). What was a shock was to see this in the newspaper articles of the time and the term 'gross negligence of duty' applied to my grandfather - assumption on my part - alcohol was likely involved, also the term cruelty. And this was circa 1917/18 when people did not get divorced) Another finding this time on my maternal side was burial notices (yes plural) in 1895 from my maternal grandmother's family. I believe my mother had mentioned to me that she thought there had been twins who died. Well, I think I found the evidence of it. Burial notice for a 6-day infant as well as a burial notice for a 4-day old infant. No indication of which cemetery in St Louis so I might do some more research on that. Who else has interesting findings
  2. clueliss

    Resistance Genealogy

    This is someone I follow on Twitter. She does 'resistance genealogy' - meaning she regularly digs into the genealogy of politicians and other famous types when they stand and spew stupid crap. https://twitter.com/CleverTitleTK She retweeted this gem after Drew Brees made his statement about 'the flag' last night. Guess who comes not only from a history of slave owning family but is tied into the removal of Choctaw Indians and the Andrew Jackson Indian Removal Act?
  3. Just for fun! I'm sure we all had that moment, when we went "what on earth happened there?". Wanna share?
  4. I decided to start this thread as a way to get links to where your ancestors were honored fighting in wars! My ancestor on my dad's mom's side fought on the Union side of the American Civil War! The problem is, he was either Irish/Northern Irish. I already know that he registered on a different name and know what the name was. Are their any websites dedicated to foreigners who fought in American wars/vice versa? You can add your questions/stories here! I want to find out if my great-great-great-grandfather has a memorial dedicated to him and the other foreigners who fought, because I would like to bring his grave flowers on Memorial day and honor him. My grandfather on my dad's side fought on the American side during WWII, and every other year we bring flowers to his grave/try to. * sorry for showing off * Thoughts, feels on your stories?
  5. I just came across a record involving an 18th-century German baptism Record (sadly not the actual document - just a listing/transcription) - can someone help me understand what the Zu Handarpe means? I was following a line of Hackman/Hakman's. Anna Margaretha is most likely an aunt of some sort. But Herman and Cath. Agness are potential grandparents.
  6. samurai_sarah

    How to get started

    What are your favourite resources? How did you get interested? Let's start chatting.
  7. If you could ask any ancestor a question; who would it be and what would you ask them? For me, it would be my 3x great grandfather, I'd ask him what his parents names were. Seeing that I can't find him. I'd also love to ask where in Ireland he as born and when. So many questions!
  8. I love a good scandal in my ancestry! Today I learned that from the looks of it, my great-aunt was born two months after my great-grandparents got married. Who knew? I suppose it's possible that the date was entered wrong (it said they were married in 1919, but it could have been 1918), but they had the name of the church, the licence number, and everything, so...I guess it's true, what they used to say: "The first child can come at anytime, but the rest take 9 months." I know, I know...nowadays, nobody cares, but back in 1919? Scandalous!
  9. I'm just curious, what countries/continents do my fellow FJers' ancestors' come from? Mine come from Europe and North America! What about the rest of you?
  10. In the other threads, we've talked about well-known places to get you started (Ancestry.com, FamilySearch.org, etc.), and everybody knows the common sources like vital records (birth/marriage/death certificates), census records, etc. What's a source you like or have had success with that people might not know? (Bonus points for sources that go back past 1850, when the aforementioned ones aren't as useful.) The two that stand out for me as I think about this: Probate records: Wills and court records that show how a deceased person's estate was divided. If you know where they died and when, and can find such a record, you can net some relatives' names and get a glimpse into their life story. I found an extensive handwritten will left by one fairly well-off relative in Indiana and it filled in several pieces that were a mystery until that point. Newspapers: Beyond genealogy-specific sources like Ancestry.com, there are several online services specializing in putting newspapers online and scanning and indexing their text, and even Google can find these occasionally. If your relative has a rare or unusually-spelled name (as my grandfather did), and ever made the news, you can find out where and when they lived and again get some details on what was going on in their life. Smaller town newspapers had a lot of community news (who's doing what) so it wasn't just crime and politics that might have made them "newsworthy". What are some of the lesser-known sources you use in your research? Success stories are always fun and motivating!
  11. This appeared on my Facebook feed courtesy of the Midwest Genealogy Center in Independence, MO. https://lisalouisecooke.com/2018/02/25/beginning-german-genealogy/?platform=hootsuite The article above has a link to this: German immigrants in American church records https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/1316260?availability=Family History Library And one of those tricks I learned during genealogy research at one point or another - you will sometimes see books listed as sources. If you go to worldcat.org you can search to see if they are located at a library - that's how I found a book on one branch of my paternal line at the library in St. Louis. (and when I do a world cat search (and then adjust my zip code, which I did after the link below) I see that the Midwest Genealogy Center has a copy as does the St. Louis Library. http://www.worldcat.org/title/german-immigrants-in-american-church-records/oclc/895167868
  12. This club is currently open to all and can be viewed by any member. I just to make sure whether or not that is okay for all, since there are advantages and drawbacks regarding privacy, while at the same time there's a possibility to make further connections. So, if you have a moment, would you mind participating in this informal poll? Would you like this club to be private with approved membership? Would you like for it to stay open for all, viewable for all? Would you prefer a compromise? Leave a comment if you want to, and suggestions!
  13. I think I've developed an addiction to Find A Grave. I'm starting to research families I'm not even related to just so I can link their gravesite memorials together. Anyone else doing this? I've always been a taphophile so getting into genealogy was a no-brainer and now Find A Grave is making cemetery research so easy. Does anyone else have this issue? Are any of you contributors?
  14. So this is a very specific scenario but it's brought up more questions than answers. I'll try to be succinct. Family history per our parents/grandpa: Our paternal grandfather was one of 9-13 kids, all or mostly boys born in Weitmar/Bochum, Germany. His parents were killed in an accident when he was a teenager and all the kids got split up and sent with various family members. Before his parents died he had quit school at an early age to work in the mines. He was the only one who was sent to America. Per my older siblings (who knew him) he never mentioned his parents nor siblings. My dad didn't even know the names of his father's siblings. So he said - he also claimed not to know how many there were but my dad never liked talking about family stuff. Several years ago I found his Ellis Island ship manifest and confirmed his age of immigration, birth date, original first name (he hated it so changed it once he got here), and occupation. He was 16 and listed as a bergmann (miner.) Confirmed that he'd come to live with an uncle/aunt and the uncle paid his passage. Address of uncle matches neighborhood where he said he lived when he got here - so far everything matches the family story. But stupid me never realized there were multiple pages to the manifest until recently and it for next of kin in country of origin it lists a name and relation is "mother." I'd always wondered what kind of accident would kill both of them at the same time, before cars, and was never able to find a train crash or anything cataclysmic for that time frame in the region (which means only that I couldn't find it.) So either the family story was false, or he lied on the manifest about next of kin back home. Now I'm fascinated. Everyone who knew him loved him - he was by all accounts a very kind and gentle man and exceptionally smart. He quit school quite young to work in the mines, but spoke 7 languages (4 fluently - English, German, Polish, and French) and knew advanced mathematics and engineering to a high degree without formal training. He was held as one of the Aliens for Special Inquiry at Ellis Island which means he was pulled aside and had to go before the board where they'd determine whether they'd let these immigrants in or deport them back. There is additional information on the special inquiry pages - and every single other person has something written in the cause for detaining column but him. Everyone! as is typical most are LPC (likely public charge - if you have to prove you can support yourself or someone else will take responsibility) or a health reason indication. There is literally nothing next to his name. He arrived on 12/31/09 and was released 01/02/10 to get on a train to Chicago. They note how many meals he ate there (they'd charge the ships for those) but no reason why he was held? I can't even find info on "what does it mean when they don't write down a reason?" I have a theory - which is based on nothing...in the description it shows his height as 5' even. He ended up as 5'7" as an adult, but my brother and one of my nephews got their height later and were very short in their early-mid teens. Men in my family tend to be late bloomers puberty wise and even as adults my dad/brother couldn't grow full beards. I'm wondering if he looked so young that they had to verify his age since he was travelling alone? I would be interested in knowing why he was held, but I'm mostly dying to know about his mother. I finally have a name but if it's his mom why did he say they were both dead before he left Germany? Or did he give another female relatives name and lie about the relationship on the document? Or did he just lie and say she was alive when she wasn't? There is one other instance of finding dodgy info regarding his family relationships. He enlisted in WWI and while stationed in Germany (as a German born but US Army solider - there were a lot of them it turns out) he met my Grandma. They married and had my dad while still in Germany. On my dad's US Consulate Birth registration (different than his German issued birth certificate) there is a notation on the back, "X says his naturalization papers are in the possession of his aunt, Jeanette (anglicized version of his aunt/uncles surname) at (listed address.) That was the address of his family (per census) but Jeanette was his cousin - not his aunt. She was a few months younger than he. And the family never anglicized the surname (think Smithski but the notation said Smith) as their death records all still have the polish suffix. So either the person writing it jotted it down wrong or he gave inaccurate information. I'd assume the US Consulate would be pretty good about getting names, right? And he loved his wife, kids, and grandkids so not like he was anti-family. Had to be a reason he never mentioned his parents or siblings...I just always assumed it was too sad but maybe there were more complex reasons. And his cousin? She outlived him by 13 years and both lived in the Chicago area until their deaths and none of my siblings remember him mentioning her or meeting her. My kids don't know extended family on my side, but there is a reason. He would have had to have had a reason, I'd think? I can't even find records so not like I'm going to be able to get into his head - but I'm dying of curiosity now and wish I'd paid more attention to the little information we were told as kids. TLDR I'm distracted and rambling while trying to psychoanalyze people who are long dead...not worth reading!
  15. I thought it would be interesting if those of us who felt comfortable posted the areas/times we were researching in case someone else was digging in the same locations/time - maybe share sources if any outside of the usual sites? I just know on my lines where I have more info I keep seeing the same other names crop up and even though they aren't mine I'd be happy to give an assist to someone else if I could. For right now my huge brick walls (which seem to be reinforced with steel) are - these are KILLING me: Neuwied/Heddesdorf/Koblenz, Germany (Rhineland Pflaz) - before 1923 Bochum/Weitmar, Germany (Westfalen) - before 1910 (Prussia at the time - ethnically Polish > immigrated to Germany to work in the mines. In Ruhr area at least 1.5 generations. It's a very specific ethnic group so I thought it would be easier to find information but it hasn't been the case since many records no longer exist.) I'll post my others when I get home and if we're working in the same areas I'm happy to share information in PM or link to my ancestry...I just don't want to post surnames since people with our hobby google surnames like it's our job! I love you guys...and that holds even if one of you turns out to be one of my cousins because virtue of you being here means you aren't one of the weirdos sharing my DNA putting confederate flags on ancestors graves. ETA: 1900s: Germany: Neuwied, Heddesdorf, Koblenz, Bochum, Weitmar Colorado: Morgan Co (breifly) Illinois: Cook Co., La Moille Bureau Colorado: Morgan Co (breifly) Iowa: Buena Vista Co. Missouri: Laclede Co 1800s Germany: Neuwied, Heddesdorf, Bochum, Weitmar Illinois: La Moille Bureau, LaSalle Missouri: Laclede Co. Ohio: Cos Ross, Fayette, Jefferson, Hamilton Ireland: Co. Cork Pennsylvania: Washington Virginia: New Jersy Tennessee: White Co, Seiverville North Carolina Indiana: Crawfordsville Maryland: Frederick This is too hard - I need a spreadsheet! And some actual memory because I can't pull it up at work or my afternoon will be shot and that's all I've got off the top of my head. (what I need is to be able to focus until I can get home and play)
  16. MayMay1123

    surnames

    what are the main surnames that you research? i have mostly Taylor, but that one is very common. These are my "everyone with this last name is related"...Elkin(g)ton...Mc/MacMurray (somewhat common, but i do know enough to be able to tell my line)...Maris...Sayre...Unruh. Others include Booker, Blong, Cody (Buffalo Bill), Kennedy, Mc/MacDonald, Matthews, O'Hara, Tyler. All United States, mostly PA. maybe someone here is my long lost relative!
  17. Inspired by Bethella's advice, I'd like to try to document the people in my tree. I already know about the ones who are still kicking, of course, but I'd like very much to find obituaries for my great-grandparents. Maybe even my grandparents, come to think of it. I found my maternal grandpa's already. I don't know where to start, though. There is not much online, that I can find anyway. The library?
  18. I have been using Ancestry to trace back family. I have most lines traced back a good long way... as far back as the 1300s in one line. However, I have a relatively recent dead end which is bugging me. I found my grandfathers father. He doesn't have the middle name we thought he had, but everything else lines up. I even spoke with someone else who was doing the family line and they were able to tell me enough about the man that I was 90% sure was my great grandfather that it sort of cemented it. Well, so we go back to my great great grandparents, and its a dead end. They came to America from Canada in 1893. The only basis I have for that is the census records. GGF was born in Ohio, and then they moved to New York somewhere along the way. I cannot get past them, cant find the crossing records, cant find birth records for anyone... just census records that start around 1910. I can't even find GGgrandmothers maiden name! Theres not even any records that the man in question was ever married to my great grandmother, with the exception of one census record where they both say married. It says he doesn't have a job, she is working as servant, and my six year old grandfather is with his mothers parents. If anyone can help me, I would greatly appreciate it. I will gladly give all the information I have, and maybe someone else can turn something up/
  19. Peas n carrots

    23andMe

    So as gift to my husband (who is into genealogy) I got him a kit. I doubt there will be too many surprises with his ancestry, but it will be interesting to see if his birth defect is genetic or not - which will be good to know if we do decide to have kids. Has anyone done the DNA test? Did you have any surprises (pleasant or unpleasant?) Now I'm wishing I would have got myself a kit too. Maybe I'll order one next time I get paid. I'm sure my genealogy results could be interesting, as I'm such a mutt.
  20. Has anybody used any software besides Family Tree Maker? I purchased FTM 2014 when I got a new laptop a couple weeks ago and it wouldn't open and their patch wouldn't work. Ancestry's customer service people were absolutely useless and pissed me off to no end. Is "the s/w would never open and patch failed" difficult to understand or something? Anyway, I finally just got my money back. I'm *this close* to cancelling my entire ancestry subscription. I've got no patience for incompetence. I've used FTM since '97 and this will be my first foray with something different. Any suggestions?
  21. On my mom's side we only traced back to my great-grandfather, who left England sometime in the 1870's, but my dad's side is another story. My aunts are absolutely crazed genealogists, traveling to England to look up old church records and the like (my family showed up in Manitoba sometime in the 1880's), and have managed to discover that we are direct descendants of William the Conqueror. We're related to quite a few prominent British people, including Sir Alexander Ball and Lord Baden-Powell (of Scouting fame). However, the biggest thing is - since our surname is Crawley - Downton Abbey has suddenly made us an object of curiosity. I have a Crawley sweatshirt, and if I wear it in public people think it's merchandise from the show. I think I even got a better mark on a paper recently because I may have implied to my prof that it was a true story about my dead great-aunts. We do have an abbey somewhere in the family lineage (Flaxley Abbey), but my dad says it's not nearly as nice as Downton. Oh well, next life. Recently, I took a DNA test, which adds more mystery into the equation. There's evidence of North African ancestry (which I imagine has something to do with my Portuguese greatxsomething grandmother) and South Asian ancestry. I'm not that big into genealogy - most of this stuff was learned from my aunts - but I do want to explore England and look up family history at some point. I'm also of Danish, French, Norwegian, Irish, Portuguese, Welsh, and Icelandic ancestry, but those are less established links. I'm eternally grateful to my aunts, who have worked hard to give us all this information, though to most of us it's simply an interesting quirk. Anyone else into genealogy here? What kind of stuff have you done to look up your ancestry? How far back can you trace your family? What sort of obstacles have you encountered?
  22. http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nati ... e/3699329/ Not sure what to make of this... The test kit did manage to figure out that I was related to my dad and to my grandma, so...
  23. http://www.camscanner.net/share/33GXv/w82s090yxy1y Under "Bridegroom," then "Parents," I'm trying to figure out his father's first name. I've said in the other thread what I think it might be, but I want other eyes.
  24. I did this yesterday. I wish I knew more about DNA, because I barely understand the tools they have, but even with my limited understanding of genetics, it's pretty cool. And free! I learned that my parents are very, very distantly related. This amuses me no end (they "hate" each other). You get a kit number and you can compare to other people if you have their kit numbers.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.