Jump to content
  • Sky
  • Blueberry
  • Slate
  • Blackcurrant
  • Watermelon
  • Strawberry
  • Orange
  • Banana
  • Apple
  • Emerald
  • Chocolate
  • Charcoal

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'childrens literature'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • General Information
    • Announcements
    • Polls Archive
  • Discussions
    • Quiver Full of Snark
    • Quiver Full of Politics
    • Wide World of Snark
    • Quiverfull of Subforums
    • SOTDRT
    • Quiver Full of Worldly Distractions
    • Recommended Reading
    • Archived Topical Threads
  • Cooking Club's General Discussion
  • Cooking Club's Recipes
  • Cooking Club's Quiverfull of Food
  • Gardening Club's Topics
  • Music Club's Forum
  • Coloring & Art Club's Coloring Forum
  • Coloring & Art Club's Drawing Forum
  • Coloring & Art Club's Painting Forum
  • Coloring & Art Club's Art Journaling
  • NaNoWriMo's Forum
  • NaNoWriMo's Critiques
  • Book Club's Forum
  • Craft Club's Other Crafts
  • Craft Club's Crocheting Forum
  • Craft Club's Knitting Forum
  • Craft Club's Sewing & Quilting Forum
  • Pets Club's Other Pets
  • Pets Club's Horse Forum
  • Pets Club's Cat Forum
  • Pets Club's Dog Forum
  • Pets Club's Pet Loss
  • Genealogy Club's Forum
  • Genealogy Club's Topics
  • Genealogy Club's Quiverfull of Genealogy
  • Religion Club's General Forum
  • Religion Club's Bible Forum
  • Religion Club's Religious Texts
  • Religion Club's Picking a church
  • Lori Alexander Accountability Group's Forum
  • Lori Alexander Accountability Group's Contradictions
  • Lori Alexander Accountability Group's Power of the Transformed Wife
  • Writers Group's Forum
  • Writers Group's Journaling
  • Writers Group's Critiques
  • Writers Group's Topics
  • Fitness Group's Forum
  • Fitness Group's Healthy Eating
  • Frugal Living Club's Forum
  • Frugal Living Club's Tips & Tricks
  • Frugal Living Club's Shopping
  • Frugal Living Club's Food/Eating
  • Work at Home Group's Forum
  • Money Group's Budgeting
  • Money Group's Investing
  • Money Group's Saving
  • Money Group's Forum
  • Continuing Education's General Discussion
  • Non Theists's Media (books, movies, music, etc.)
  • Non Theists's General
  • Non Theists's Polls and Play
  • Doll Collectors Group's Ball Jointed Dolls
  • Doll Collectors Group's American Girl
  • Doll Collectors Group's Doll Chat
  • Doll Collectors Group's Refurbishing
  • Doll Collectors Group's Accessories
  • Weight Loss and Fitness Club's Weight Loss/Fitness Forum
  • Travel Club's Travel General Discussion

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Found 14 results

  1. I was quite taken about the funny and exciting-to-read Harry Potter discussion, that were sparked on the other threads now. So let´s have a thread about it! Talk about why you love it or why you hate it. What´s the best part, what´s the worst part and what a child (or a teen, or a adult!) could gain from it. And what else books are dear to you? What are you reading to your children and at what age? What do you let them read? In the Nym household, we keep to the classics, mostly. My oldest is going to be a First Grader in September. That´s our Children´s Book Style: Grimm´s fairy tales and similar fairy tales, Austrian Folk Tales and similar, Wilhelm Busch´s rhyming picture stories, Mira Lobe ("The little I-am-I"), Else Ury (Short Stories and Nesthäkchen), Paul Biegel ("Tulle Dwarfs"),... you get the picture :). Waldorf books like a Jahreszeitenbuch/the Year-around-book are also really great! Would you recommend Harry Potter for a under-10yrs-old? Valerie loves everything with witches, fairies, ghosts and all the like. We already started "That Lovely Mister Devil" from Christine Nöstlinger And both my girls adore Bibi Blockberg! Mr Nym says, although he isn´t a fan of Harry Potter character, he likes that it seems to create a quite positive image about Boarding Schools, so he is okay with us both reading the first book together with her, if she would like it.
  2. I'm a huge Little House on the Prairie fan (both the show and the books.) Well there's a passage in Little House in the Big Woods that talks about how one of the ways that pioneers stayed warm when they were traveling in the winter was by putting baked potatoes in their pockets. So my sister and I tried it out. We went for a walk when it was 20 degrees outside with a baked potato in each pocket. And the crazy thing is IT WORKS. We stayed warm the entire time!
  3. Today is the beloved author of children's literature, Beverly Cleary's 100th birthday. As a little girl, Beverly had a lot of trouble learning to read until a librarian took her aside and introduced her to some books she thought that Beverly would like. A sixth grade teacher told her she should write children's books. Beverly knew that the kids in kid's books tended to be too-good-to-be-believed and so she wrote her characters as imperfect real kids. Beverly Cleary http://www.cnn.com/2016/04/11/living/beverly-cleary-100th-birthday/index.html Who are your favorite Beverly Cleary characters? I love Otis Spofford and Ellen Tebbits most especially, but I love them all! Happy Birthday, Beverly!
  4. Lillian

    Anne of Green Gables

    Does anybody else here love Anne?? Does anybody else hate 'The Continuing Story' and 'A New Beginning'?? I watched the first movies just last December, and since seeing it on TV have been in a massive Anne phase. Love love love the first 2 movies, absolutely despise the second 2. Especially the 2008 one, 'A New Beginning'. Kevin Sullivan just went on way to much of a tangent for me, I prefer at least loosely sticking to Montgomery's story. Other opinions?
  5. Grimalkin

    What are your kids reading?

    My son is in first grade, after three girls I realize I only have a few books I think he may like. We have the HP books, some books about dogs....Animal Ark I think, what's popular with the boys? So far he is big on non-fiction early readers about sharks and giant squids and the like. I like to keep a variety of books because you never know what will catch their interest. He is not quite ready for chapter books, but I would like to get familiar with the genre, While we are on this subject, in case people are looking for books for their kids, My nine year old girl recently read and loved The Doll People series by Ann M. Martin (my older girls liked it too) Fairest by Gail Carson Levine- she has several good books Candy Apple series which is meh. Princess Academy- don't remember author She is starting to like the Warrior series by Erin Hunter about cats. * I don't know if I posted this or dreamt it but I have some fuzzy memory of a guy at the bookstore telling me that Babysitter Club books are being made into a graphic novel.
  6. ! {TEXT1}: This conversation started in one of the Joshley Madison threads: viewtopic.php?f=87&t=26846&start=40#p1012531 Except the Malfoys ultimately chose their son over Voldemort. Voldemort is their Gothard, and they hate muggles and muggle-borns just as much as Gothardites hate teh gays and non-Christians. When the Malfoys were about to get everything they ever wanted - the downfall of Harry and Voldemort was on the brink of victory - Mrs. Malfoy was only concerned about the safety of her son. She was willing to throw everything away and risk death/torture for her son. These crap holes would never do that. And don't compare butt weasels to Ma and Pa Keller, that's mean to butt weasels
  7. Palimpsest

    Pollyanna Haters Gather Here

    I detested Pollyanna. I also choked on "What Katie Did" and "Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm." I can add the "Five little Peppers" and (much later) "The Tanglewoods Secret" (Patricia St. John) to the roll call along with many other evangelical preachy girly books. The do-goodiness and fake virtue just killed me. I read a whole heck of a lot of approved "Christian" reading when I was young. The Maxwells have almost certainly not read these books because fiction = bad in Maxhell. I had more freedom. I still love to mine these old novels for small evidences of insurrection. Even the sanctimonious Katie goes to school (What Katie Did Next) and the Patsy books and Daddy-long-legs (Webster) have girls going to college. Anne goes to college too, but I see Anne of Green Gables as a positive revolutionary. Until she sadly dwindled into being Gilbert's wife in later books. Alcott also has a place here. She tried to break boundaries. Laura Ingalls of "Little House" breaks all boundaries -- but we already have threads for her. Please discuss and add to the roster other turn of the century or earlier "Girls" novels. Thanks.
  8. Not sure where to post this, but Cokie Roberts has a new children's book out honoring our Founding Mothers. I bet its much more accurate than anything in Palin or Limbaugh's attempts to rewrite our history. I plan on getting it for my great nephew's first birthday since I have a pact with his mother to give him collectible, quality children's books for Christmas and Birthdays. (Exposing our boys to women's accomplishments is as important as exposing our girls IMO). http://www.amazon.com/Founding-Mothers- ... ie+roberts (I didn't break link because it's Amazon. If that's not appropriate, will the mods please fix?)
  9. This is just crazy. http://www.cracked.com/quick-fixes/the- ... ens-movie/ One of the most beloved and oft-quoted moments in the ridiculously beloved and oft-quoted film Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory is the sequence in which the unbalanced candymaker displays his newest invention: lickable wallpaper. As the children and their guardians go to town on the wallpaper, Wonka declares: "Lick an orange. It tastes like an orange. The strawberries taste like strawberries! The snozzberries taste like snozzberries!" We laugh, because "snozzberries" is obviously a fanciful, fictional word, and nobody knows what they really were. Except that Roald Dahl, the book's author, knew exactly what snozzberries were: They're dicks. Snozzberries are dicks. Willy Wonka made those kids lick dick-flavored wallpaper. It turns out the guy who thought a story about an insane recluse casually murdering a group of children had a pretty fucked up sense of humor. In 1979, Dahl decided to revisit snozzberries in his adult novel My Uncle Oswald. The equally witty and disgusting story revolves around Oswald Hendryks Cornelius, the titular uncle and "greatest fornicator of all time." Along with his sexy accomplice Yasmin Howcomely, he devises a complicated get-rich-quick scheme that involves Howcomely seducing Europe's most famous men and then selling used condoms full of their spent semen to women wishing to birth famous progeny. Please take some time to remind yourself that this book was written by one of the world's most beloved children's authors. The term "snozzberry" comes up when Yasmin Howcomely recounts her experience with George Bernard Shaw: "How did you manage to roll the old rubbery thing on him?" "There's only one way when they get violent," Yasmin said. "I grabbed hold of his snozzberry and hung onto it like grim death and gave it a twist or two to make him hold still." "Ow." "Very effective." "I'll bet it is." "You can lead them around anywhere you want like that." Read more: http://www.cracked.com/quick-fixes/the- ... z2laQae73y
  10. A little friend of mine is huge into reading. Right now it's princesses this and fairies that. She's got some non-nauseating ones (Enchanted Forest Chronicles etc) but it'd be great to have FJ's help with a book list of more realistic fare like Judy Blume and Phyllis Reynolds Naylor's Alice books.
  11. I hope this is the right place to post this. When I was a child, I read an excellent book or books about a young girl in an African village. She was very curious and intelligent and a bit unhappy about the gender role expectations she was supposed to obey. At one point, the girl's brother attended his coming of age ceremony, where his earlobes were cut with a knife. His sister was not supposed to attend the ceremony, but she was curious and peeked from behind some bushes. The lobes became infected and he got very sick. The girl felt it was her fault for peeking. A foreign nurse cured him with antibiotics, and relieved her guilt about how the ears had become infected. This caused the young protagonist to become interested in gaining an education. Despite this plot, I recall the author treated the customs and culture of the African village very respectfully (at least from my childish persective it seemed like a pretty nice place). Does anyone recall this book? I am trying to find it and cannot seem to do so. I don't remember the title or the author. I know this is a well-read crowd so I thought perhaps someone could help me. Thanks!
  12. merrily

    Chronicles of Narnia

    I do admit, I loved the first Narnian book (Lion, witch and wardrobe), however, I hated the books that came after that. It was like CS Lewis pulled stuff out of thin air (which was true, as LWW was his first book). I especially disliked Susan being denied into being with her family because she was *gasp* discovering her feminity. It's like slut shaming, but for kids. Personally, I think Susan's withdrawing into fashion/boys was a way of coping and her siblings didn't get that. What do you think?
  13. So we were at the library today, the public library. (Because we're godless heathens, church membership notwithstanding.) And this series caught my 10 year old daughter's eye. My first response was "What is that tripe doing in a public library. Then I told Daughter she couldn't read them. I've never told her that before. I've told her when you're older but never no outright. Of course she asked why and I told her. Bad theology, it's meant to make you think you should submit to bad people just because they're men. I told her I think the books would upset her. But now I'm wondering if I knee-jerked too hard. She's a smart kid, very independent, very sure of herself, budding feminist. But still, she's ten. And some things she's too young to really think through. Thoughts? Anyone else ever told their kid they couldn't read something.
  14. I'm looking for children's books that would help to explain different religions and belief systems to children. I already have some books that deal with Christianity, but I'm always open to hearing about new ones on that subject. And I would also like to find books about Judaism, Buddhism, really any religion or belief system that's widely practiced. As well as books about holidays celebrated within that religion or belief system (such as Hanukkah, Kwanza, and any others I may be leaving out.) The age range doesn't matter too much - it can be anywhere from books for toddlers all the way up to school age (but hey, if you have good books on the subject for teens, go ahead and throw those suggestions in here too and I'll file them away for the future.) Thanks!
×