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  1. What's new in this club
  2. So I discovered a lot of ancestry.com leads that led me to newspapers.com (and you can save the clippings over to ancestry). FYI Newspapers does offer a 7-day free trial which I'm taking advantage of at the moment. So yesterday I looked up my paternal family surname (sort of common in the US) in the small town my father is from. While I was hoping for obituaries for his mom, sister and father what I found was a series of divorce announcements, etc for my paternal grandparents (not a shock since I had figured out from evidence as well as a discussion with my uncle about them). (oh and they married, divorced/split up/she went with his brother for a while/then got back together and had my dad and uncle). What was a shock was to see this in the newspaper articles of the time and the term 'gross negligence of duty' applied to my grandfather - assumption on my part - alcohol was likely involved, also the term cruelty. And this was circa 1917/18 when people did not get divorced) Another finding this time on my maternal side was burial notices (yes plural) in 1895 from my maternal grandmother's family. I believe my mother had mentioned to me that she thought there had been twins who died. Well, I think I found the evidence of it. Burial notice for a 6-day infant as well as a burial notice for a 4-day old infant. No indication of which cemetery in St Louis so I might do some more research on that. Who else has interesting findings
  3. I have had two WTF moments . The one was finding out that my one ancestor , Stephen Duncan Burns , is also a distant cousin . So yeah , Pennsylvania backwoods folks can be inbred too . Another WTF moment I had , and probably the most controversial yet , was when researching a family name in my genealogy , Stumpner , I discovered that some Stumpners were Jewish , and had settled in Krakow , Poland https://jri-poland.org/databases/jridetail_2.php , while others were not Jewish , and were found among the great-great grandparents of this notable / notorious historical figure http://wargs.com/other/hitler.html . I am not sure which , if any , of these people I might be related to . Also , if all Stumpners are interrelated , then that would mean that Hitler would have wound up sending some of his extended family to their deaths , such as possibly this person https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/jgdetail_2.php .
  4. This is similar to the surnames of some of my Pennsylvania German ancestors . I kid you not , one of them had the maiden name of Feck , alternately Faeg , and the other Fuchs , pronounced with a long U , and in German the "ch" would have been pronounced with the " ka" sound , it means fox in English , which was what it was later Anglicized to .
  5. Upon researching my family tree , I discovered that I am descended from both a Revolutionary War veteran , Thomas Bolton Burns , and a Union Civil War veteran , his grandson , Stephen Duncan Burns . So , I might possibly be eligible to join both the Sons of the American Revolution , and the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War . Being that I am male , I obviously would not be eligible to join the DAR . So far though , I have just been part of a club that consists of me , myself , and I . The activity of this club is to buy small U. S. flags to adorn the graves of Union , and Revolutionary soldiers graves , at a nearby cemetery , whenever I see that the flags have disappeared , and gone unreplaced , which unfortunately happens more often than some might think . And though I have never as of yet gotten to visit the grave of Stephen D. Burns , there is a grave at the local cemetery I mentioned that no longer has a name marker . So as the identity of this soldier has been lost , I have sort of informally adopted his grave , and pay my respects to it , as if it were that of my own ancestor .
  6. Marmion

    Introduce yourself

    I first got into history because , for one thing I have always been interested in History , and I wanted to learn more specifically about my ancestors role in historical events , and pay tribute to them . More personally though , I had wanted to try to see if I could find any concrete evidence to back up this bit of family folklore passed along by an uncle of mine . He had claimed that I had a great-great-great-great grandmother whom was a Native American , of the Crow nation . Well , upon doing extensive research , I found out that the closest ancestor whom fit the bill , was the wife of Conrad Weiser , whom from what I have read somewhere was at one time thought by some reputable historians to have been a Mohawk , as until fairly recently her maiden name had been lost , and her children were said to have had bronze complected skin , and black hair , as an aside so had my late paternal grandmother , whom was their descendant . https://archive.org/stream/lifeofjohnconrad00weiser/lifeofjohnconrad00weiser_djvu.txt However , now her surname , and the identity of her patents has since been uncovered . So while I had ended up refuting that which I had set out to prove , I still have found an interesting story anyway . Plus there were other interesting ancestors I have found as well . So I am satisfied with my results .
  7. I've posted this elsewhere, but my fave so far is a family name of Fukkink. Especially got a giggle when I went on ancestry.ca and found all the generic questions, such as: "What did your Fukkink ancestors do for a living?" and "What is the average Fukkink lifespan?"
  8. I believe it's Daughters of Union Veterans
  9. I'd forgotten the genealogy section existed, so thanks, @raspberrymint, for resurrecting this thread! I'm eligible on both parents' side to join the DAR, but I probably never will. I'm not a joiner, and I'm lazy--it's too much work gathering all the evidence together. I just know I'd forget to dot an i or cross a t, and the DAR would reject me. I've had enough rejection in my life already. I could join the United Daughters of the Confederacy, too, thanks to my father's great grandfather, but...um...nope. Who knows, he could have been the one who shot my maternal 3rd great grandfather at Monocacy battlefield, resulting in him being imprisoned in Danville and dying a few months later. So yeah, I'll skip the UDC, too. I also have a collateral ancestor on mom's side who was among the first to receive the Medal of Honor. Not for risking life and limb to save a fellow soldier, but for risking life and limb to keep the Union flag flying in the midst of gunfire, or something like that. But though he's well documented, he's not in my direct line, so that wouldn't get me into the Union equivalent of the UDC (I can't remember what it's called. United Daughters of the Union? ).
  10. Orringe (pronounced orange) and Smiley, unrelated men.
  11. raspberrymint

    Respecting Ancestors who Were in Wars

    My white ancestors on my dad's side fought for the confederacy and my paternal grandfather was discarded for being biracial (half black half white). This grandfather was a veteran himself, but died a few days after returning home. He isn't considered someone who died serving, though I think he should be because his cause of death was directly connected to what he sustained overseas. He was cremated. His ashes are with my grandmother and will go to his oldest child, my father's sister, when my grandmother passes (then to my aunt's son, then to my aunt's grandson, etc). I just recently found out that I have maternal ancestors who fought for the Union. I moved near where those ancestors lived and visited old historical buildings where I found this. They aren't direct ancestors. I have no idea how to honor anyone nor if I want to. I broke off contact with my family in general for personal reasons. My mother's side where I'm from was much crueler than my father's side. The relatives near where I live now are distant, either in nursing homes or unaware I exist. The paternal aunt who inherits my grandfather's ashes is homophobic, as is her son, so I doubt I could ever have a say in anything there.
  12. clueliss

    Question About German Surnames

    And interesting about the location since that is near Westerkappeln where I've also found baptismal records and the like. (Also looking at the map and thinking - hmmm, okay, now I know why either 23 & Me or Ancestry is telling me that the netherlands is an area my genes come from since it is next door. )
  13. prayawaythefundie

    Question About German Surnames

    Yeah, no problem. I‘m not a geneaology expert at all but am happy to help with anything language related / original German documents if you need it.
  14. clueliss

    Question About German Surnames

    Thank you - I'll have to dig into this later.
  15. prayawaythefundie

    Question About German Surnames

    @clueliss Are you still interested? The link @Bethella provided is the way to go, the google translator results do not make much sense to German ears / eyes. It looks like the original surname of these people was Hackman which could have two different meanings depending on the region. Since this was in Westphalia, the meaning „merchant“ would be more likely but „doorkeeper“ is possible as well, according to German wikipedia. Zu Handarpe indicates that the place Handarpe in Westphalia is the family‘s home. Since this is an old document, it can mean just that because people used the preposition zu back then meaning „from“ or „in“ while in modern German one would say aus or in. In modern German the zu would defininetely only be used as a nobiliary particle instead of using it for any family from that place. To find out if the zu is just an old indication of the family‘s home village or indeed an indicator of nobility, one could check their parents‘ and grandparents‘ documents, that‘s if you have them. Is the last name Hackman constantly followed by the zu Handharpe in all documents for a few generations? Then it‘s likely a nobiliary particle. If the zu Handharpe just surfaces every now and then or can even be found for the first time in this generation and was not obviously acquired by marriage (someone would have „married up“ then) it is probably just a mention of the village.
  16. One of my paternal grandpa’s elder brothers died at about four years of age in 1924. Grandpa always said he remembered the funeral even though he wasn’t a year old yet. I always thought of this great uncle as a younger brother to my grandpa even though he was a few years older than grandpa.
  17. clueliss

    How to get started

    I've also resorted to, if I know a specific location, putting in the last name without a first name so I can see all of the last name living in a town or county. (which led me to find a great grandmother at one address, her sister, brother, grandfather and a couple of others at a second address and I think her father and uncle at a third address with no sign of her mother or another sister anywhere).
  18. Bethella

    How to get started

    Assuming you're an American, most public libraries have a subscription to Ancestry. I'd recommend checking locally and trying it out before you bother paying for your own subscription. 1940 is the most recent US Census that has been released, 1950 will be released in April 2022 (after 72 years). The most recent full Canadian Census that has been released is 1921 (there's a 1926 Census of the Prairie Provinces- Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba that's available too), 1931 should be released in 2023 (after 92 years). Here's a link that explains the available Canadian records. https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/census/Pages/census.aspx If you're having trouble locating someone that should be in the census, you can try looking for multiple spellings of the name or even look for the first name along with other information (such as location, age, names of other family members, etc) leaving the last name blank. I have a couple of relatives whose last names were so garbled in the transcription that my regular searches couldn't identify them, but, for example, by narrowing down to Andrew married to Margaret living in X town in 1880, I could find them.
  19. WiseGirl

    How to get started

    Any advice for finding U.S. census information? I keep getting sent to the 1940 as the most recent. What would be the Canadian equivalent? Very much a newbie, as I just started this weekend. Do most people join Ancestry?
  20. WiseGirl

    Canadian Resources

    I'm very much a newbie at this (as in started thus weekend). Anyone have suggestions for French Canadian sources? Quebec area for sure also possibly Montreal. Does anyone find Google translate to be helpful?
  21. That would explain a lot. My great-grandfather was in the Air Force too.
  22. There was a fire in the records from WWII in the 70s (I think). A lot of info was lost. My grandpa was at signal school then suddenly attached to a bomber squadron across the country. WWI records are even harder for some reason.
  23. I've had some real WTF moments. One with what little I've found pertaining to my paternal grandmother's family. The biggest being her mother going by initials in one census that don't correspond with her name. And then there are the questions I have about my maternal grandfather's dead older brother. He was born ~3 yrs before my grandfathers parents got married, my great-grandfather is listed as his father on his death certificate, but my great-grandfathers obituary doesn't count him as one of the kids my great grandparents had together. I can only assume his biological father was another man or that he died so long ago that he was an afterthought. I have a lot of unanswered questions about what this same great-grandfather actually did during the war. I found a record of someone who I think was him enlisting in Oct. 1945.
  24. My WTF moment - one time I went up to the cemetery to find where some of my ancestors were buried. Something interesting I found was that one set of great-grandparents from my mom's side of the family were buried almost right next to a set of great-great-grandparents from my dad's side of the family. These burials were decades before my parents met but it just struck me that there was a connection between the families even before my parents met.
  25. Well if I could ask my ancestors who came over from Europe the way things are going here I'd probably want to know what the fuck were they thinking coming over here? Yeah, I know my family would have had a front row seat to all the wars and that Europe is not anywhere near perfect but I would almost have rather been born over there.
  26. Bethella

    Question About German Surnames

    I'm not German but I found this on wikpedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_nobility#Nobiliary_particles And according to google translate "zu handarpe" translates to "to handle" while "Hackman Zu Handarpe translates to Hackman Hacking"
  27.  



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