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AmazonGrace

Roy Moore is a *censored*

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AmazonGrace

According to Wapo, Roy Moore may be a sexual deviant, which should ensure he'll get elected. 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/investigations/woman-says-roy-moore-initiated-sexual-encounter-when-she-was-14-he-was-32/2017/11/09/1f495878-c293-11e7-afe9-4f60b5a6c4a0_story.html?utm_term=.6e3c76e55335

Investigations

Woman says Roy Moore initiated sexual encounter when she was 14, he was 32

By Stephanie McCrummen, Beth Reinhard and Alice Crites November 9 at 12:52 PM 

Spoiler

 


Leigh Corfman, left, in a photo from 1979, when she was about 14. At right, from top, Wendy Miller at around age 16, Debbie Wesson Gibson at around age 17 and Gloria Thacker Deason at around age 18. (Family photos)

Leigh Corfman says she was 14 years old when an older man approached her outside a courtroom in Etowah County, Ala. She was sitting on a wooden bench with her mother, they both recall, when the man introduced himself as Roy Moore.

It was early 1979 and Moore — now the Republican nominee in Alabama for a U.S. Senate seat — was a 32-year-old assistant district attorney. He struck up a conversation, Corfman and her mother say, and offered to watch the girl while her mother went inside for a child custody hearing.

“He said, ‘Oh, you don’t want her to go in there and hear all that. I’ll stay out here with her,’ ” says Corfman’s mother, Nancy Wells, 71. “I thought, how nice for him to want to take care of my little girl.” 

 


This undated family photo shows Leigh Corfman with her mother around 1979 when she was around 14 years old. (Family Photo/Family Photo)

Alone with Corfman, Moore chatted with her and asked for her phone number, she says. Days later, she says, he picked her up around the corner from her house in Gadsden, drove her about 30 minutes to his home in the woods, told her how pretty she was and kissed her. On a second visit, she says, he took off her shirt and pants and removed his clothes. He touched her over her bra and underpants, she says, and guided her hand to touch him over his underwear. 

“I wanted it over with — I wanted out,” she remembers thinking. “Please just get this over with. Whatever this is, just get it over.” Corfman says she asked Moore to take her home, and he did.

Two of Corfman’s childhood friends say she told them at the time that she was seeing an older man, and one says Corfman identified the man as Moore. Wells says her daughter told her about the encounter more than a decade later, as Moore was becoming more prominent as a local judge.

Aside from Corfman, three other women interviewed by The Washington Post in recent weeks say Moore pursued them when they were between the ages of 16 and 18 and he was in his early 30s, episodes they say they found flattering at the time, but troubling as they got older. None of the women say that Moore forced them into any sort of relationship or sexual contact.

Wendy Miller says she was 14 and working as a Santa’s helper at the Gadsden Mall when Moore first approached her, and 16 when he asked her on dates, which her mother forbade. Debbie Wesson Gibson says she was 17 when Moore spoke to her high school civics class and asked her out on the first of several dates that did not progress beyond kissing. Gloria Thacker Deason says she was an 18-year-old cheerleader when Moore began taking her on dates that included bottles of Mateus Rosé wine. The legal drinking age in Alabama was 19. 

Of the four women, the youngest at the time was Corfman, who is the only one who says she had sexual contact with Moore that went beyond kissing. She says they did not have intercourse.

In a written statement, Moore denied the allegations.

“These allegations are completely false and are a desperate political attack by the National Democrat Party and the Washington Post on this campaign,” Moore, now 70, said.

The campaign said in a subsequent statement that if the allegations were true they would have surfaced during his previous campaigns, adding “this garbage is the very definition of fake news.”

None of the women have donated to or worked for Moore’s Democratic opponent, Doug Jones, or his rival in the Republican primary, Luther Strange, according to campaign reports.

Corfman, 53, who works as a customer service representative at a payday loan business, says she has voted for Republicans in the past three presidential elections, including for Donald Trump in 2016. She says she thought of confronting Moore personally for years, and almost came forward publicly during his first campaign for state Supreme Court in 2000, but decided against it. Her two children were still in school then and she worried about how it would affect them. She also was concerned that her background — three divorces and a messy financial history — might undermine her credibility.

“There is no one here that doesn’t know that I’m not an angel,” Corfman says, referring to her home town of Gadsden.

Corfman described her story consistently in six interviews with The Post. The Post confirmed that her mother attended a hearing at the courthouse in February 1979 through divorce records. Moore’s office was down the hall from the courtroom.

Neither Corfman nor any of the other women sought out The Post. While reporting a story in Alabama about supporters of Moore’s Senate campaign, a Post reporter heard that Moore allegedly had sought relationships with teenage girls. Over the ensuing three weeks, two Post reporters contacted and interviewed the four women. All were initially reluctant to speak publicly but chose to do so after multiple interviews, saying they thought it was important for people to know about their interactions with Moore. The women say they don’t know one another.

“I have prayed over this,” Corfman says, explaining why she decided to tell her story now. “All I know is that I can’t sit back and let this continue, let him continue without the mask being removed.”

This account is based on interviews with more than 30 people who said they knew Moore between 1977 and 1982, when he served as an assistant district attorney for Etowah County in northern Alabama, where he grew up.

****

Moore was 30 and single when he joined the district attorney’s office, his first government job after attending the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, serving in Vietnam, graduating from law school and working briefly as a lawyer in private practice in Gadsden, the county seat.

By his account, chronicled in his book “So Help Me God,” Moore spent his time as a prosecutor convicting “murderers, rapists, thieves and drug pushers.” He writes that it was “around this time that I fashioned a plaque of The Ten Commandments on two redwood tablets.” 

“I believed that many of the young criminals whom I had to prosecute would not have committed criminal acts if they had been taught these rules as children,” Moore writes.

Outside work, Moore writes that he spent his free time building rooms onto a mobile home in Gallant, a rural area about 25 miles west of Gadsden. 

According to colleagues and others who knew him at the time, Moore was rarely seen socializing outside work. He spent one season coaching the Gallant Girls, a softball team that his teenaged sister had joined, said several women who played on the team. He spent time working out at the Gadsden YMCA, according to people who encountered him there. And he often walked, usually alone, around the newly opened Gadsden Mall — 6 feet tall and well-dressed in slacks and a button-down shirt, say several women who worked there at the time. 

Corfman describes herself as a little lost — “a typical 14-year-old kid of a divorced family” — when she says she first met Moore that day in 1979 outside the courtroom. She says she felt flattered that a grown man was paying attention to her. 

“He was charming and smiley,” she says. 

After her mother went into the courtroom, Corfman says, Moore asked her where she went to school, what she liked to do and whether he could call her sometime. She remembers giving him her number and says he called not long after. She says she talked to Moore on her phone in her bedroom, and they made plans for him to pick her up at Alcott Road and Riley Street, around the corner from her house.

“I was kind of giddy, excited, you know? An older guy, you know?” Corfman says, adding that her only sexual experience at that point had been kissing boys her age.

She says that it was dark and cold when he picked her up, and that she thought they were going out to eat. Instead, she says, he drove her to his house, which seemed “far, far away.”

“I remember the further I got from my house, the more nervous I got,” Corfman says. 

She remembers an unpaved driveway. She remembers going inside and him giving her alcohol on this visit or the next, and that at some point she told him she was 14. She says they sat and talked. She remembers that Moore told her she was pretty, put his arm around her and kissed her, and that she began to feel nervous and asked him to take her home, which she says he did. 

Soon after, she says, he called again, and picked her up again at the same spot. 

“This was a new experience, and it was exciting and fun and scary,” Corfman says, explaining why she went back. “It was just like this roller-coaster ride you’ve not been on.” 

She says that Moore drove her back to the same house after dark, and that before long she was lying on a blanket on the floor. She remembers Moore disappearing into another room and coming out with nothing on but “tight white” underwear. 

She remembers that Moore kissed her, that he took off her pants and shirt, and that he touched her through her bra and underpants. She says that he guided her hand to his underwear and that she yanked her hand back.

“I wasn’t ready for that — I had never put my hand on a man’s penis, much less an erect one,” Corfman says. 

She remembers thinking, “I don’t want to do this” and “I need to get out of here.” She says that she got dressed and asked Moore to take her home, and that he did. 

The legal age of consent in Alabama, then and now, is 16. Under Alabama law in 1979, and today, a person who is at least 19 years old who has sexual contact with someone between 12 and 16 years old has committed sexual abuse in the second degree. Sexual contact is defined as touching of sexual or intimate parts. The crime is a misdemeanor punishable by up to one year in jail. 

The law then and now also includes a section on enticing a child younger than 16 to enter a home with the purpose of proposing sexual intercourse or fondling of sexual and genital parts. That is a felony punishable by up to 10 years in prison. 

In Alabama, the statute of limitations for bringing felony charges involving sexual abuse of a minor in 1979 would have run out three years later, and the time frame for filing a civil complaint would have ended when the alleged victim turned 21, according to Child USA, a nonprofit research and advocacy group at the University of Pennsylvania.

Corfman never filed a police report or a civil suit.

She says that after their last encounter, Moore called again, but that she found an excuse to avoid seeing him. She says that at some point during or soon after her meetings with Moore, she told two friends in vague terms that she was seeing an older man.

Betsy Davis, who remains friendly with Corfman and now lives in Los Angeles, says she clearly remembers Corfman talking about seeing an older man named Roy Moore when they were teenagers. She says Corfman described an encounter in which the older man wore nothing but tight white underwear. She says she was firm with Corfman that seeing someone as old as Moore was out of bounds. 

“I remember talking to her and telling her it’s not a good idea,” Davis says. “Because we were so young.”

A second friend, who spoke on the condition of anonymity for fear of losing her job, has a similar memory of a teenaged Corfman telling her about seeing an older man. 

After talking to her friends, Corfman says, she began to feel that she had done something wrong and kept it a secret for years.

“I felt responsible,” she says. “I felt like I had done something bad. And it kind of set the course for me doing other things that were bad.”

She says that her teenage life became increasingly reckless with drinking, drugs, boyfriends, and a suicide attempt when she was 16.

As the years went on, Corfman says, she did not share her story about Moore partly because of the trouble in her life. She has had three divorces and financial problems. While living in Arizona, she and her second husband started a screen-printing business that fell into debt. They filed for bankruptcy protection three times, once in 1991 with $139,689 in unpaid claims brought by the Internal Revenue Service and other creditors, according to court records.

In 2005, Corfman paid a fine for driving a boat without lights. In 2010, she was working at a convenience store when she was charged with a misdemeanor for selling beer to a minor. The charge was dismissed, court records show.

**** 

This undated photo shows Gloria Thacker Deason when she was around 18. (Family Photo)

The three other women who spoke to The Post say that Moore asked them on dates when they were between 16 and 18 and he was in his early 30s.

Gloria Thacker Deason says she was 18 and Moore was 32 when they met in 1979 at the Gadsden Mall, where she worked at the jewelry counter of a department store called Pizitz. She says she was attending Gadsden State Community College and still living at home. 

“My mom was really, really strict and my curfew was 10:30 but she would let me stay out later with Roy,” says Deason, who is now 57 and lives in North Carolina. “She just felt like I would be safe with him. . . . She thought he was good husband material.”

Deason says that they dated off and on for several months and that he took her to his house at least two times. She says their physical relationship did not go further than kissing and hugging.

“He liked Eddie Rabbitt and I liked Freddie Mercury,” Deason says, referring to the country singer and the British rocker.

She says that Moore would pick her up for dates at the mall or at college basketball games, where she was a cheerleader. She remembers changing out of her uniform before they went out for dinners at a pizzeria called Mater’s, where she says Moore would order bottles of Mateus Rosé, or at a Chinese restaurant, where she says he would order her tropical cocktails at a time when she believes she was younger than 19, the legal drinking age.

“If Mother had known that, she would have had a hissy fit,” says Deason, who says she turned 19 in May 1979, after she and Moore started dating.

This undated family photo shows  Wendy Miller around the time she was 16. (Family Photo)

Around the same time that Deason says she met Moore at the jewelry counter, Wendy Miller says that Moore approached her at the mall, where she would spend time with her mom, who worked at a photo booth there. Miller says this was in 1979, when she was 16.

She says that Moore’s face was familiar because she had first met him two years before, when she was dressed as an elf and working as a Santa’s helper at the mall. She says that Moore told her she looked pretty, and that two years later, he began asking her out on dates in the presence of her mother at the photo booth. She says she had a boyfriend at the time, and declined.

Her mother, Martha Brackett, says she refused to grant Moore permission to date her 16-year-old daughter. 

“I’d say, ‘You’re too old for her . . . let’s not rob the cradle,’ ” Brackett recalls telling Moore.

Miller, who is now 54 and still lives in Alabama, says she was “flattered by the attention.” 

“Now that I’ve gotten older,” she says, “the idea that a grown man would want to take out a teenager, that’s disgusting to me.” 

This undated family photo shows Debbie Wesson Gibson when she was around 17. (Family Photo)

Debbie Wesson Gibson says that she was 17 in the spring of 1981 when Moore spoke to her Etowah High School civics class about serving as the assistant district attorney. She says that when he asked her out, she asked her mother what she would say if she wanted to date a 34-year-old man. Gibson says her mother asked her who the man was, and when Gibson said “Roy Moore,” her mother said, “I’d say you were the luckiest girl in the world.”

Among locals in Gadsden, a town of about 47,000 back then, Moore “had this godlike, almost deity status — he was a hometown boy made good,” Gibson says, “West Point and so forth.” 

Gibson says that they dated for two to three months, and that he took her to his house, read her poetry and played his guitar. She says he kissed her once in his bedroom and once by the pool at a local country club.

“Looking back, I’m glad nothing bad happened,” says Gibson, who now lives in Florida. “As a mother of daughters, I realize that our age difference at that time made our dating inappropriate.” 

****

By 1982, Moore was by his own account in his book causing a stir in the district attorney’s office for his willingness to criticize the workings of the local legal system. He convened a grand jury to look into what he alleged were funding problems in the sheriff’s office. In response, Moore writes, the state bar association investigated him for going against the advice of the district attorney, an inquiry that was dismissed.

Soon after, Moore quit and began his first political campaign for the county’s circuit court judge position. He lost overwhelmingly, and left Alabama shortly thereafter, heading to Texas, where he says in his book that he trained as a kickboxer, and to Australia, where he says he lived on a ranch for a year wrangling cattle. 

He returned to Gadsden in 1984 and went into private law practice. In 1985, at age 38, he married Kayla Kisor, who was 24. The two are still married.

A few years later, Moore began his rise in Alabama politics and into the national spotlight. 

In 1992, he became a circuit court judge and hung his wooden Ten Commandments plaque in his courtroom.

In 2000, he was elected chief justice of Alabama’s Supreme Court, and he soon installed a 5,280-pound granite Ten Commandments monument in the judicial building. 

In 2003, he was dismissed from the bench for ignoring a federal court order to remove the monument, and became known nationally as “The Ten Commandments Judge.”  

Moore was again elected chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court in 2012, and was again dismissed for ignoring a judicial order, this time for instructing probate judges not to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. 


Roy Moore speaks during the annual Family Research Council's Values Voter Summit in Washington on Oct.13. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

All of this has made Moore a hero to many Alabama voters, who consider him a stalwart Christian willing to stand up for their values. In a September Republican primary race to replace the seat vacated by Attorney General Jeff Sessions, Moore defeated the appointed sitting senator, Luther Strange, who was backed by President Trump and other party leaders in Washington. Moore faces the Democratic nominee, Doug Jones, in a special election scheduled for Dec. 12.

On a visit home in the mid-1990s to see her mother and stepfather in Alabama, Corfman says, she saw Moore’s photo in the Gadsden Times. 

“ ‘Mother, do you remember this guy?’ ” Wells says Corfman said at the time. 

That’s when Corfman told her, Wells recalls. Her daughter said that not long after the court hearing in 1979, Moore took her to his house. Wells says that her daughter conveyed to her that Moore had behaved inappropriately.

“I was horrified,” Wells says. 

Years later, Corfman says, she saw a segment about Moore on ABC News’s “Good Morning America.” She says she threw up.

There were times, Corfman says, she thought about confronting Moore. At one point during the late 1990s, she says, she became so angry that she drove to the parking lot outside Moore’s office at the county courthouse in Gadsden. She sat there for a while, she says, rehearsing what she might say to him.

“ ‘Remember me?’ ” she imagined herself saying.

 

 

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onekidanddone

Was just about to post this.  I'm not shocked by these things anymore.  In fact I kinda expect it. The louder one claims to be 'moral' and have a direct line to God the more sinister and immoral they are.

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Cartmann99
6 minutes ago, onekidanddone said:

Was just about to post this.  I'm not shocked by these things anymore.  In fact I kinda expect it. The louder one claims to be 'moral' and have a direct line to God the more sinister and immoral they are.

Yup. Those who preach the loudest about morality, tend to have a whole damn cemetery of skeletons in their closet.

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GrumpyGran
26 minutes ago, Cartmann99 said:

Yup. Those who preach the loudest about morality, tend to have a whole damn cemetery of skeletons in their closet.

And yet, the good people of Alabama will choose one of these:

1. He's asked God to forgive him and God did, it's none of your business.

2. Fake news, they're liars looking for money.

3. He has been anointed by God, this is the devil or some other shit, ask one of those rambling "prophets", they'll explain it, MAGA!

4. Look over there! Hillary, Bengazi, emails, Harvey Weinstein, Bill Clinton, fake dossier, uranium, Bama/Auburn(choose one) sucks.

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onekidanddone

You forgot:

  • Obama!
  • Inner cities!
  • Mexicans steeling our jobs!
  • Muslims!
  • War on Christmas!
  • War on coal!
  • Black Lives Matter!
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Audrey2

Of course another Republican has been accused of being a pervert. The Republicans are the party of the bathroom bills, the ones screaming loudest not to allow Transgendered folks to use the appropriate bathroom. Methinks they judge everyone by themselves- that is, they can't keep their hands off women so no one else born with xy chromosomes can either. 

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47of74

Yeah I was just coming here myself to note the latest diamond level member of the GOP Hypocrite's Club®.  

It would not surprise me in the least if Moore had done this.

Of course since he's a Republican, all he'll have to do is convince everyone he found Jeeeezus and all will be forgiven by the party of pervs.   

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AmazonGrace

Republican reactions: 

Lots of "This is bad if proven true."  Appearing to condemn yet leaving themselves a caveat. Like someone is going to find a video to prove it 40 years later. If the woman's word is and the word of those  other people Wapo spoke with are not enough it's never going to be enough.)

A few  "disgusting, he needs to step aside now."

Also featuring John Merrill: it's not true because the first time we heard of it was the first time we heard of it. (A brilliant defense because it works for any case) 

JIm Ziegler:  Child molestation is okay because Joseph f***ed  Mary.  (I thought the story was he didn't...?) 

David Hall: The girl may have lied about her age.  Further, molesting 14 year olds is okay if you also molest 16 year olds (see Dale's replies.

Jerry Pow: He may be a child molester but at least he's not a Democrat. 

 

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hasunah

Look at it from the bright side , at least he's a white, christian , heterosexual predator  

 

:irony:

 

 

 

 

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RosyDaisy

Roy Moore will win the Alabama Senate race. Democrats are the most hated people here. Hated more than child molesters. I am not exaggerating. I wish I were.

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Evangeline

It's worth noting that top Republicans are calling for him to drop out. And that is not because they've suddenly acquired morals. It's because they can't control Moore and they know it. They're scared after Tuesday, and they see that moderates are deserting them because Moore is just that embarrassing. They'll try to find a way to get that Trump stooge Luther Strange in that seat, even though he lost the primary. 

Now is a really good time to donate to the Doug Jones campaign! 

Edited by Evangeline

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Cartmann99

I feel sick...

 

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GreyhoundFan

"Roy Moore used Breitbart to try to get in front of allegations that he pursued teenage girls"

Spoiler

It is not unusual for a political figure to try to get in front of bad news. Recall that in July, when the New York Times was about to report on the contents of emails Donald Trump Jr. sent before meeting with a Russian lawyer during the presidential campaign, Trump Jr. decided to post the emails on Twitter “in order to be totally transparent.”

The idea was to make the Times' report seem inconsequential — before it even published — by appearing to release the emails voluntarily.

Roy Moore, the Republican Senate candidate in Alabama, made a similar effort on Thursday to head off The Washington Post's report that he allegedly initiated a sexual encounter with a 14-year-old and dated teenagers when he was in his 30s. But Moore did not use Twitter or any official campaign channel. He used Breitbart News.

Minutes before The Post published its report, Breitbart posted a preemptive response from Moore under one of its signature, all-caps headlines: “AFTER ENDORSING DEMOCRAT IN ALABAMA, WASHINGTON POST PLANS TO HIT ROY MOORE WITH ALLEGATIONS OF INAPPROPRIATE RELATIONS WITH TEENAGERS; JUDGE FIRES BACK DENIAL.”

(Disclaimer: The Washington Post editorial board endorses candidates, not The Washington Post newsroom.)

Breitbart has made no secret of its support of Moore. Website chairman Stephen K. Bannon headlined a rally for Moore before September's GOP runoff in Alabama, and there is not even a pretense of neutrality in Breitbart's coverage of the general-election contest between Moore and Democrat Doug Jones.

Yet Breitbart's willingness to be used as a media-relations arm of Moore's campaign is a dive even deeper into the tank.

It is reminiscent of the time in March 2016 when Breitbart conjured an elaborate, alternative account of an incident in which Donald Trump's campaign manager at the time, Corey Lewandowski, grabbed the arm of a female reporter — a reporter who worked for Breitbart, no less. Reconstructing the episode, Breitbart asserted that its own journalist must have mistaken Lewandowski for someone else.

Video evidence later proved that it was indeed Lewandowski who grabbed the reporter, Michelle Fields. Breitbart removed its article challenging Fields's account, but its initial, reality-defying defense of the Trump campaign drove Fields, editor-at-large Ben Shapiro and spokesman Kurt Bardella to resign in protest.

Breitbart, to its credit, has since demonstrated that it can hold Trump accountable on foreign policy, immigration, health care and other issues that are important to the president's base. In fact, getting behind Moore put the site at odds with Trump, who endorsed incumbent Republican Sen. Luther Strange in the runoff.

Now, however, Breitbart is veering back toward blind loyalty to a candidate.

No big surprise here.

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hoipolloi

Sadly, it looks like @RosyDaisy is correct:

Quote

 

Alabama State Rep. Ed Henry (R), Trump’s other Alabama campaign co-chairman, was even harsher.

“I believe it is very opportunistic and they are just looking for their chance to get on some liberal talk show. I’m sure they’ve probably been offered money by entities that surround the Clintons and that side of the world. We know they will pay to dirty anyone’s name that’s in their way. If you believe for a second that any of these are true then shame on these women for not coming forward in the last 30 years, it’s not like this guy hasn’t been in the limelight for decades. I call B.S. myself. I think it’s all lies and fabrication,” Henry told TPM.

When asked about McConnell’s comments, he erupted.

“Mitch McConnell, and you can quote me on this, is a dumbass, a coward, a liar himself and exactly what’s wrong with Washington, D.C. He would love for Roy Moore not to be in Washington, he’d much rather have a Democrat. Mitch McConnell is scum,” he said, putting the chances at “zero” that the state party would un-endorse Moore.

 

However, there's also this:

 

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GreyhoundFan

"Why evangelical voters are unlikely to bail on Roy Moore"

Spoiler

Roy Moore won the Republican nomination for the Senate seat in Alabama this year on the strength of his long-standing advocacy for hard-right conservative and evangelical values.

Twice elected chief justice of Alabama’s Supreme Court, he left that role both times on behalf of his religious beliefs. In 2003, he was removed from office for refusing to take a monument of the Ten Commandments out of a state building. In 2016, he was suspended for refusing to uphold the Supreme Court’s decision on same-sex marriages.

When challenged by Luther Strange for the nomination to the seat vacated by Attorney General Jeff Sessions, Moore never trailed.

On Thursday afternoon, The Washington Post published a story detailing allegations from four women who say they were pursued by Moore when they were teenagers and he was in his 30s. One, Leigh Corfman, described how Moore had initiated sexual contact with her when she was 14 and he 18 years older.

Republicans on Capitol Hill — many of whom supported Strange in the primary, it’s important to note — quickly called for Moore to drop out of the Senate race, a move that seems unlikely. (Moore tried to get ahead of The Post’s story by denying it in advance to Breitbart.) The question then becomes whether Moore can win the general election race against Democrat Doug Jones in light of the allegations — particularly given that nearly half the state identifies as evangelical, suggesting that a moral question might dampen his support.

Recent history, though, suggests that he might not lose substantial evangelical support. That recent history is Donald Trump.

On Oct. 7, 2016, The Post had another scoop: Donald Trump had been recorded casually talking about sexual assault while preparing for a segment on “Access Hollywood.” When he denied having actually assaulted anyone during a presidential debate, a number of women came forward to say that he’d done to them precisely what he described in those audio recordings.

The result for Trump? He won more support from evangelical voters than any Republican since the question of religious identification began being asked.

... < chart >

Nearly half of Trump’s support — 46 percent — identified as white evangelical Protestant.

In the wake of the “Access Hollywood” tape, PRRI released data showing that, for evangelical voters, moral rectitude had faded in importance since 2011. More than any other religious group, evangelicals said that someone who acts immorally in their personal lives can still serve morally in office.

... < chart >

Part of this is certainly a response to what was known about Trump. Evangelical voters supported Trump, so they were willing to say that any indiscretions were irrelevant.

But why did they support him so fervently? One factor is that Trump’s opponent, Hillary Clinton, was fervently opposed by evangelical voters. Our Sarah Pulliam Bailey wrote about that last October:

She symbolizes much that runs against their beliefs: abortion rights advocacy, feminism and, conversely, a rejection of biblical ideas of femininity and womanhood. Perhaps even more significantly, Hillary Clinton, as an outspoken and activist first lady, is inextricably tied in the minds of conservative Christians to their loss of the culture war battles beginning with Bill Clinton’s first term in 1993.

That last point, about the culture wars, is important. In June, Politico’s Tim Alberta explained why evangelicals continued to stand by Trump.

Yet for Christians who feel they are engaged in a great struggle for the identity of America — and fear that their side has been losing ground — the most important question is not whether Trump believes in their cause, but whether he can win their wars. “Jimmy Carter sat in the pew with us. But he never fought for us,” Ralph Reed, chairman of the Faith and Freedom Coalition, told me after the president’s speech. “Donald Trump fights. And he fights for us.”

Ergo: Support for Trump. In August, Pew Research reported that half of those who approve of Trump approved of his performance in office not because of his policies but because of his approach and personality: his leadership, his willingness to “speak his mind,” that he wasn’t a typical politician. It was the style that appealed to them, not what he stood for.

Which brings us to Moore. Moore’s political background is predicated on engaging in the sort of fights that evangelical voters would like to see fought.

Moore is aware of this. He tweeted this in early October:

... < tweet >

Last week, he looped Clinton into the fight:

... < another tweet >

How Trump stumbled onto the right message for evangelicals isn’t clear, but it probably stems in part from tracking conservative media. Moore, on the other hand, was steeped in it.

The allegations against Moore are decades old and, for those interested in dismissing them, dismissible as pitting his word against the women’s. It seems unlikely, then, that evangelical voters would, at this point, reject his candidacy, especially with Moore denying the charges as fervently as he is.

If Donald Trump — a one-time New York Democrat on his third wife with little connection to religious faith before his political run — can keep the support of the evangelical community, it seems unlikely that a conservative Alabama judge who lost his job in defense of the Ten Commandments is at much risk of seeing that support evaporate.

Sad, but true.

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VixenToast
1 hour ago, Cartmann99 said:

I feel sick...

 

Despicable, deplorable bastard. Him attempting to use his God-Fearing Christianity card to fool gullible Christians into believing Satan is afoot, and, no, it ain't Ol' Roy here, naw, it's them librul Hilary lovin' atheist journalists and democrats. Ughhhhh

:dontgetit:

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GrumpyGran
5 hours ago, onekidanddone said:

You forgot:

  • Obama!
  • Inner cities!
  • Mexicans steeling our jobs!
  • Muslims!
  • War on Christmas!
  • War on coal!
  • Black Lives Matter!

I also forgot Chicago!

 

They're performing this coming weekend in New Jersey. Shameful.

Seriously, let's stop referring to these people as Christians. They are as far from that as you can get. Satanists are more moral than these people and probably do a better job of walking in Jesus' shoes. That quote from Zeigler shows how ignorant these people are with regard to Christian dogma and the Bible. I'm sure lots of these rabid opportunists aka "Christians" looked at that statement and thought "Wait, what? Wasn't Mary a..., oh, okay, guess Mary wasn't a virgin, so glad he corrected me on that!" Now they'll make up some bullshit hand-waving about her being a spiritual virgin but not a physical one.

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onekidanddone
3 hours ago, GreyhoundFan said:

"Roy Moore used Breitbart to try to get in front of allegations that he pursued teenage girls"

  Reveal hidden contents

It is not unusual for a political figure to try to get in front of bad news. Recall that in July, when the New York Times was about to report on the contents of emails Donald Trump Jr. sent before meeting with a Russian lawyer during the presidential campaign, Trump Jr. decided to post the emails on Twitter “in order to be totally transparent.”

The idea was to make the Times' report seem inconsequential — before it even published — by appearing to release the emails voluntarily.

Roy Moore, the Republican Senate candidate in Alabama, made a similar effort on Thursday to head off The Washington Post's report that he allegedly initiated a sexual encounter with a 14-year-old and dated teenagers when he was in his 30s. But Moore did not use Twitter or any official campaign channel. He used Breitbart News.

Minutes before The Post published its report, Breitbart posted a preemptive response from Moore under one of its signature, all-caps headlines: “AFTER ENDORSING DEMOCRAT IN ALABAMA, WASHINGTON POST PLANS TO HIT ROY MOORE WITH ALLEGATIONS OF INAPPROPRIATE RELATIONS WITH TEENAGERS; JUDGE FIRES BACK DENIAL.”

(Disclaimer: The Washington Post editorial board endorses candidates, not The Washington Post newsroom.)

Breitbart has made no secret of its support of Moore. Website chairman Stephen K. Bannon headlined a rally for Moore before September's GOP runoff in Alabama, and there is not even a pretense of neutrality in Breitbart's coverage of the general-election contest between Moore and Democrat Doug Jones.

Yet Breitbart's willingness to be used as a media-relations arm of Moore's campaign is a dive even deeper into the tank.

It is reminiscent of the time in March 2016 when Breitbart conjured an elaborate, alternative account of an incident in which Donald Trump's campaign manager at the time, Corey Lewandowski, grabbed the arm of a female reporter — a reporter who worked for Breitbart, no less. Reconstructing the episode, Breitbart asserted that its own journalist must have mistaken Lewandowski for someone else.

Video evidence later proved that it was indeed Lewandowski who grabbed the reporter, Michelle Fields. Breitbart removed its article challenging Fields's account, but its initial, reality-defying defense of the Trump campaign drove Fields, editor-at-large Ben Shapiro and spokesman Kurt Bardella to resign in protest.

Breitbart, to its credit, has since demonstrated that it can hold Trump accountable on foreign policy, immigration, health care and other issues that are important to the president's base. In fact, getting behind Moore put the site at odds with Trump, who endorsed incumbent Republican Sen. Luther Strange in the runoff.

Now, however, Breitbart is veering back toward blind loyalty to a candidate.

No big surprise here.

Will Stevie throw Roy under the bus if he does not win?  Just like he and Trump tossed poor  Ed under the Metro?

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Cartmann99

I'm so cynical that I think Moore could probably admit that the allegations were true, and still win. Especially if he tells a good story about how Jesus and his wife got him back on the right path. :pb_sad:

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onekidanddone
1 hour ago, Cartmann99 said:

I'm so cynical that I think Moore could probably admit that the allegations were true, and still win. Especially if he tells a good story about how Jesus and his wife got him back on the right path. :pb_sad:

Like the shit fuck who won his Congressional seat after assaulting a reporter.

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GrumpyGran
50 minutes ago, onekidanddone said:

Like the shit fuck who won his Congressional seat after assaulting a reporter.

There does seem to be a theme of loving violence, doesn't there?

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candygirl200413

Then Sean Hannity, of course, said it was consensual with the 14-year-old. Cause, of course, he would!

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JMarie

Not that it changes anything, but this offers another insight into Moore's craziness.  He hates preschools! (from 2007)

http://www.wnd.com/2007/05/41824/

Quote

Why, then, do social liberals like Hillary Clinton push so hard for the expansion of preschool programs? Perhaps they understand the truth of Proverbs 22:6 better than most parents: “Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it.When the mind of a young child is subjected to state control before fundamental concepts and basic beliefs are formulated, the child is much more likely to learn a liberal social and political philosophy with the state as his or her master. Creation and God-given rights are more easily replaced with evolution and government-granted rights. Totalitarian regimes like those of Adolf Hitler and Joseph Stalin knew well the value of a “youth corps.” As Hans Schemm, leader of the Nazi Teacher’s League, once observed, “Those who have the youth on their side control the future.”

The education of our Founding Fathers offers a stark contrast to the state-run education machine of the 21st century. At a time when state schools did not exist, Americans during the 18th century were the most literate and well-informed in history. “The Federalist Papers,” a collection of newspapers articles written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and John Jay concerning the Constitution that are still studied in colleges today, were read by farmers back in the Revolutionary era. Poetry, science and religion flourished in that time without the support of the state. Even today, children educated at home have shown more academic promise than those taught in government schools. One study found that, on average, homeschoolers out-performed their counterparts in the public schools by 30 to 37 percentile points in all subjects.

Any attempt to extend government-controlled education to pre-kindergarten children is another unjustifiable attempt to indoctrinate our youth. After all, the admonition to train up children was given to parents, not government. More parental involvement rather than more federal intervention will improve American education. It is time for parents to ignore the liberal elites and pay attention to the academic development of their children.


Read more at http://www.wnd.com/2007/05/41824/#Pp44YTIRRkERS83l.99

Hmm, where have I heard that "train up a child" line???

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Cleopatra7
4 hours ago, Cartmann99 said:

I'm so cynical that I think Moore could probably admit that the allegations were true, and still win. Especially if he tells a good story about how Jesus and his wife got him back on the right path. :pb_sad:

Remember that the conservative politicians Josh Duggar used to take selfies with were more offended by the Ashley Madison accounts than the molestations. They seem to think that the solution to every problem, not matter how big or small, is heterosexual Christian marriage and if you’re doing straight marriage right (ie adhering to gender stereotypes and putting up the appearance of monogamy) then that somehow erases any past misdeeds. They need to stop calling themselves “values voter” since the only things they value are the ability to impose their will on others. Which is fine if you espouse a Nietzchean philosophy, but incongruous for so-called “Christians.”

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RosyDaisy

This is very simple. Democrats are very much hated here in Alabama. The most Conservative Christian Republican will win. People vote with their Bible here. Nothing else matters. Moore is already considered a martyr, and this will just make him even more of one even if he admits to the allegations. Sick bastard!

 

 

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