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ladyamylynn

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33 posts in this topic

@Cartmann99 omg:pb_lol: that thing is...something, I don't know if I'd call it food, I suppose yes cos well if you're hungry and there's nothing else...but it's not what I'd call a "real homemade meal" *shudder

This is more what was in my mind

 

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2 hours ago, laPapessaGiovanna said:

omg:pb_lol: that thing is...something, I don't know if I'd call it food, I suppose yes cos well if you're hungry and there's nothing else...but it's not what I'd call a "real homemade meal" *shudder

I know. I can rant for hours on the topic of what is currently considered a "real homemade meal" in many American homes.  Many Americans enjoy watching people cook on television, while they wait for the pizza delivery person to show up. :pb_sad:

On a happier note, even though I don't speak Italian, I enjoyed the video you posted and would happily eat that.  It's the same basic concept used for preparing Hamburger Helper, but with much better ingredients. I can see how cooking the pasta in the sauce would make it more flavorful. :pb_smile:

 

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Is there anything high in protein that I might want to try?  I'm so sick of protein shakes at this point.

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@laPapessaGiovanna lol you're talking the so-called one-pot-pasta, don't you? I think it's a trend that was sparked by Martha Stuart, among others. It's ok if you have little time, space, only one pot and you stick to the recipe exactly. Not my cup of tea, though. I could go on and on about how sad I think it is that so little people nowadays, especially in the US, but also in parts of Europe, know how to cook and make a proper home-made meal. I would never touch anything like hamburger helper, but I also realize that I have been brought up differently and I find cooking home-made meals rewarding, others don't and they don't have the time. It's a fine line between being critical and judgmental. I try not to be judgmental, but sometimes I can't help it.

@47of74 Why yes, there's a lot you can eat instead of the protein shakes. I recommend jerky beef, but keep in mind that some jerky beef contains a lot of sugar so always check the ingredients list. You could include more chicken grilled steak, beef steak, eggs, cheese, and fish in your diet. Salmon is always great, as are shellfish and tuna. You could snack on walnuts, almonds and other 'nuts' and try to include more legumes in your diet: beans, lentils, peas. Quinoa is supposed to be high in protein also IIRC. Hope that helps. 

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What's the best way to peel a hard boiled egg?  I've tried older eggs, rolling them on the counter and other methods, and usually wind up with a mess.  Thanks!

 

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Posted (edited)

49 minutes ago, gilora said:

What's the best way to peel a hard boiled egg?  I've tried older eggs, rolling them on the counter and other methods, and usually wind up with a mess.  Thanks!

 

Are you trying to peel the eggs while they are still slightly warm? If so, don't. That will end in a mess. I make sure that after cooking I rinse them under a stream of really cold water. Then I let them cool down even more for quite a bit. Hold the egg in your palm, turn around and gently smash it on the counter, keep egg within your hand.Push slightly and roll forth (or back) only once. It should then come out rather easily without making a mess. The mess usually comes from rolling back and forth too many times. You want the shell to break into major chunks not into 1000 tiny parts. You can try rolling them on the counter on a paper towel. That should alsomake dealing with the mess a lot easier. 

It has always worked for me.

Edited by Pretzel
added a few important details
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On 2/26/2017 at 9:25 PM, ladyamylynn said:

! A way I like to preserve tomatoes during the height of the season is to chop them, put onto a foil-lined baking sheet with salt, pepper, olive oil, and a minced clove of garlic or shallot and roast them at a really low temp until they basically melt. Scoop them into a freezer bag and toss in the freezer or make them into a quick sauce. 

@Destiny

      I just want to mention that this is the best most delicious way to preserve an abundance of tomatoes. So excited to have enough this year to do this.

 

          Thinking of some questions to ask.

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Posted (edited)

I know DaniLouisiana has been deactivated, but she asked a legit question on how to substitute pepper/paprika/chili. If anyone still cares, for the sweetness, there's always the option of using tomatoes of all kinds. Dried, powder, fresh, paste etc. A great substitute when you're trying to spice up something is mustard. Powdered mustard can add the little je ne sais quoi to chilies, sauces etc. Dijon mustard can add spice to all kinds of meat, whether you add it to your ground meat when making meat loafs, or you're rubbing your steak with it as a marinade. Mustard seeds are great for making pickles, soups and sauces. French mustard with black mustard kernels, also known as old style mustard, is amazing in home made salad dressings or to add a little something to a store bought dressing. 

My favorite dressing is made of oil, lemon juice, honey, old style mustard, salt, pepper and fresh herbs. Parsley, dill, basil, chives, oregano, garlic, etc...

Edited by Pretzel
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